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Used a 123 block, maybe the third time I ever have....

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  • Used a 123 block, maybe the third time I ever have....

    had a piece of aluminum about 90mm diameter and a bit over 25mm thick to cut in half for making two pulleys about 88mm dia x 12 mm thick.

    it would not fit in the bandsaw jaws with enough held to be in any way stable and still put the cut where it was needed. But a little bit had to be in the jaws, because of where the saw blade is.

    So I grabbed a 123 block and some long screws. held the slab to the block, and clamped the block between some pieces of scrap that held the vise jaws far enough apart that the slab would fit .

    Took a long time, but the saw cut it with only about 1mm total of wander. The blade was not really coarse enough, which is why it took so long, the gullets would fill up and the blade wanted to jam. So I took to counting..... 7 wheel turns "on" and 3 with the blade lifted, over and over.....

    I guess those things are useful enough to keep.. That's once every 3 or 4 years they get used.





    Last edited by J Tiers; 04-14-2011, 11:34 PM.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    J
    Lay a candle or two in the path of the blade when cutting aluminum and the gullets will stay clean, as the wax acts like a dry lube
    Rich

    Neat cut !
    Green Bay, WI

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    • #3
      The problem is not so much the gullets filling and it not cutting, but rather carryover that is picked up and brought around again, crosswise.... That causes an abrupt impact as the "pin" is re-cut.

      I tried wax, and have found that while it might let the blade cut a bit better in some ways, the carryover problem was not solved, and might have been worse from the wax gluing more loose swarf onto the blade.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        considering installing one of those round wire wheels just after the cut - they work well at knocking the chips out of the gullets. They must be available from industrial supply or maybe even cheaper a small dia one for an angle grinder. It wouldn't be a huge project to make a little ball bearing spindle and bracket....throw it on the to do pile/heap/mountain/continent
        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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        • #5
          I've used a brush for that... it loads up and starts shedding bits back onto the blade......

          Maybe if used completely dry, no wax, might work.
          1601

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

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          • #6
            I use my 1-2-3 blocks almost daily for different set ups

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            • #7
              I know I'm cheap, but I think you got me beat. Treat yourself to a coarse tooth blade for that rare occassion. I only have one fine tooth band, a 10-14 variable pitch, that gets used about once every 2 years for cutting thin wall stuff.
              Harry

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              • #8
                It's a plan..........

                But it's not so much being cheap, as not wanting to take the "other" one off and fit on the one I "should" use*..... it's not just a matter of opening some doors and flipping a lever on this saw. Although there may be some "flipping" as there's a flipping lot of screws to take out, or at least loosen.

                * although, truth be told, there isn't a coarse tooth saw blade in the shop right now.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Comment


                • #9
                  "But it's not so much being cheap, as not wanting to take the "other" one off and fit on the one I "should" use..."

                  Know the feeling well.
                  Harry

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mochinist
                    I use my 1-2-3 blocks almost daily for different set ups

                    Me too? I use 1-2-3 and even 2-4-6 blocks fairly often. I have two sets of 1-2-3 blocks and they get used for all kinds of set-ups. I even have a pair of imports that came for free. I use them for welding jigs/etc. I figured they were an indispensible part of shop tooling.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Fasttrack
                      I figured they were an indispensible part of shop tooling.
                      I bought into that idea too, used them one time, and not again for several years. This was the third time, IIRC.

                      But I like metric, so maybe I just don't have that fractional attitude....

                      I have several other blocks that I have NEVER used....... they are smaller, and measure 1" x 1.25" x 2". I have 5 of them that I got at a sale. I have absolutely no idea what they were for, each has two through holes in the long faces and one each in the ends.
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by J Tiers
                        I bought into that idea too, used them one time, and not again for several years. This was the third time, IIRC.

                        But I like metric, so maybe I just don't have that fractional attitude....
                        Not sure what it is, but I'm a hack at best for a machinist, and most of my stuff doesn't require super tolerances other than the rare bearing press fit, but I use 123 blocks all the time. I've got several "good ones" (B&S), several chinese in solid and holed, and 5 B&S 1x2x12 "parallels" (dumpster rescues that are still accurate to way less than a thou) that also see very frequent use. The later are often used to simply space up a part to clear some feature while supporting on "true" machined surfaces. I've even got some shop made "good approximations" (made with a fly cutter) along with various thickness parallels of similar construction that I use for fabrication setup to clamp weldments. Basically an almost every day part of my project setups. Probably more an aspect of the type work done than anything else.
                        Russ
                        Master Floor Sweeper

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                        • #13
                          1-2-3 Blocks are one of those pieces of equipment where the use is only limited by the imagination of how to use them in a situation.

                          Some people just have limited imagination
                          .

                          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                          • #14
                            For bandsawing aluminum make sure your saw is on it's fastest speed. Coarse blade if possible and use any means to clear chips. Good Industrial saws will have a rotating chip brush to remove the chip from the gullet. If this is not possible try a little compressed air. You could mount a piece of locline so it blows on the teeth.

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                            • #15
                              Saw is an old Atlas H-V type, and air is in the shed shop, but not the basement shop. The wheel is a good idea, if I can keep it from becoming a "chip application device".

                              Originally posted by John Stevenson
                              1-2-3 Blocks are one of those pieces of equipment where the use is only limited by the imagination of how to use them in a situation.

                              Some people just have limited imagination
                              Got plenty of that........ I get paid to imagine things and then make them.

                              Maybe I just have not had the reflex to grab the 123 blocks for a setup, or maybe I just don't do things that require them very often.

                              One thing that cuts down on using them is a mill with ONE t-slot on the table. I can use it for a hold-down, or a table strip (key), but not both, so most of my fixtures are special-built and have a key on them.

                              With more slots, one for alignment key, one to hold block, and one left to clamp down the work against the block and table.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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