Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hole Saw Arbor?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hole Saw Arbor?

    The retaining nut on my hole saw arbor has left hand threads. The saw can be turned over to reverse the cutting direction. My understanding was that the preferred direction of cut was in the conventional direction. This means that the rotation changes with the side and direction of feed. The key keeps the saw and spacers from turning. So why did they go to the trouble to use the left hand threads?
    Byron Boucher
    Burnet, TX

  • #2
    some people remove the key, As they feel its better to spin the saw then explode it, if it jams.
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hole saw arbor? Or milling cutter arbor??

      Dave

      Comment


      • #4
        Left hand threads usually used to ensure the nut stays on rather than loosening- depends on the direction of rotation of the arbor. My table saw with the arbor to the left has a normal thread. The ones at work with the arbor to the right, the threads are left hand. Chop saw- left hand. Skil type saw- right hand.

        This is pretty basic, so maybe there's more to the question than that-
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by becksmachine
          Hole saw arbor? Or milling cutter arbor??

          Dave
          ?? I never saw a "hole" saw that could be turned over. All I've ever seen
          are like a cup with a hole in the center of the bottom.
          ...lew...

          Comment


          • #6
            Sounds like you are talking about a regular milling arbor, like those used commonly on horizontal mills? I've never seen a hole saw arbor with a spacer, or one that you could change cutting direction.

            The left hand nut is to make sure the 'stack' of spacers,cutter(s) and/or running bushings don't get loose. I fall into the "I use keys" club, I use a key, usually under my cutter and running bushing at least, most of the spacers are held just by the compression force of the nut.
            James Kilroy

            Comment

            Working...
            X