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    I am looking for an auxiliarly air tank for my shop. Something like 30 to 50 gallon size. The major players want more than I paid for the compressor for a tank. Anybody know of a good source for something like this where I won't pay an arm and a leg?
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  • #2
    Have you considered getting a used compressor and removing the pump? That could work well if you find the right unit. You might even call a repair shop or two and ask if they have any broken compressors with good tanks or if they know someone who does. Could be fairly cheap if the owner wants to get rid of it anyway.

    Comment


    • #3
      i've used old 100 lb propane tanks, rinsed and cleaned . . . you may be able to buy them for scrap $ from a propane supplier.

      Comment


      • #4
        Ditto on the propane tank but be careful with old ones. They often have rust in them and can leak after a while. My brother in law converted one years ago and this occurred to his. He found a second in better shape and it worked very well. Added a drain at the bottom and all was good.

        Comment


        • #5
          I like the idea of a propane tank.

          One option is to find out who the local service centers are for Campbell Hausfeld, IR etc. They usually have tanks from warranty work that was beyond repair.

          Comment


          • #6
            Around my area the Amish who run their equipment,power tools, house appliances, submersible well pumps, off air pressure use the large propane tanks,, the horizontal ones about 40 inches in diameter x 8ft long.
            Some have two connected together.
            Not sure how many gallon those tanks are, but it must be considerable.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by davidh
              i've used old 100 lb propane tanks, rinsed and cleaned . . . you may be able to buy them for scrap $ from a propane supplier.
              dito

              mount it upside down & any water drains out, simpels

              john
              John

              I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by sasquatch
                Around my area the Amish who run their equipment,power tools, house appliances, submersible well pumps, off air pressure use the large propane tanks,, the horizontal ones about 40 inches in diameter x 8ft long.
                Some have two connected together.
                Not sure how many gallon those tanks are, but it must be considerable.
                I thought the Amish rejected moden indusrial tecnology

                john
                John

                I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

                Comment


                • #9
                  A few thoughts- propane tanks don't have to deal with moisture inside, so aren't coated. You might want to roll some epoxy resin around inside to at least give the bottom a coating.

                  As far as drainage goes, most any fitting I've seen protrudes upwards into the tank somewhat, so there's always going to be a pool of water left in the bottom after draining. Since I don't like those drain valves anyway, I'm going to propose simply drilling a hole, say 1/4 inch diameter or less, at the lowest point of the tank, then sealing that with a spring-loaded rubber plug or even a flat rubber washer from the outside. You can arrange a rod down the side of the tank to operate a lever which opposes the spring pressure to uncap the hole to drain the tank. In my opinion, those drain valves are awkward enough that you might tend to drain less often, and on the same hand something easy to operate from a standing position beside the tank would have you draining the tank every day or more often if humidity is high and you use lots of air. The simple catch basin would still catch the water, but you also avoid getting your hand messed up since you don't have to reach down and turn a valve right where the mess is coming out.

                  Another alternative which I thought might be good is a tube going in from the top and extending right to the bottom of the tank. The bottom of the tube would have a few notches in it where the water would flow when a valve is opened on the tube at the top. Piping would direct the expelled water into a catch can or whatever, keeping the mess away from your hand as well, and promoting a more frequent drain interval. I'm just not a fan of bending down beside the tank and reaching under to operate the drain valve, getting messed up while doing so.
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Jugs: Re the Amish shunning technology:

                    They are changing a number of things, they have to gradually as time goes on.
                    All Amish homes in my area are almost completely modern now, just no electricity.
                    Air powered everything, including a few counter top appliances like food blenders etc. Their shops here, (And they do have some big furniture manufacturing shops,) are all air powered, or the equipment has hydraulic motors, bandsaws etc, the shops all have infloor heating piping heated from an outside deisel engine that either powers a compressor for air, or powers a hydraulic pump that is also piped in the floor to machine outlets.
                    These conversions are very well done and very interesting.
                    They do have a system that works for them.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Air tank.

                      AIR TANK.. a real good one.. found under the scrap yard school bus.. has nice mounts for a saddle type mount to the Channel frame, has fittings all over it including some to drain the tank.

                      Stand it up vertical? mucho better, about four feet long, one here in the shop has large fittings welded onto it making a real nice lil sand blaster.

                      I have another here I am fixing to make a water drain for my car and bike painting here since I have been getting along with the large diameter pvc water seperator column. Now about ten years.. (it'll blow, it'll blow.. it'll kill all the neighbors..)..
                      Excuse me, I farted.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Paul,

                        here is where I bought my bare tank http://www.compressorworld.com/30-Ga...Only-p/v30.htm

                        I bought a 60 gallon tank three years ago for around $350.00, You are paying for the UL tag..liability you know.

                        I work for a propane company and have access to lots of 100# and bigger tanks and yet I bought a new air tank for my tire service truck. When I first started my tire business I had a cobbled up array of tanks and I cringed everytime I needed more than 100# of air. IMO it is just not worth it..buy a tank that is made for your application and have some peace of mind.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It took me a bit to get meback to this. Other priorities. Yesterday the electrician installed a new breaker panel for my house and new shop. I needed more circuits and the TWO boxes that it replaced were both full to the gills. I now have ten extra circuits and the only worry is the 125 Amp service. If that becomes a problem they will have to run a new feed to the new box, but the new box is 200 Amps so no problem there.

                          Back to air tanks. Thanks for all the answers. Or should I have said "tanks". Sorry, I couldn't resist.

                          The prices on new tanks are about the same as for inexpensive compressors with tanks. I guess I was hoping for a secret source for a reasonable one. The propane thing sounds good or a used tank from a local repair shop. Too late to call around today so it's Monday, I guess.

                          I wonder how safe it is to drill holes in them and add drain valves. I wouldn't want a spark to set off a big bang. Or have an added drain fixture come out at 125 PSI. Either scenario could be lethal. I will look for used tanks first.


                          Originally posted by sasquatch
                          Jugs: Re the Amish shunning technology:

                          They are changing a number of things, they have to gradually as time goes on.
                          All Amish homes in my area are almost completely modern now, just no electricity.
                          Air powered everything, including a few counter top appliances like food blenders etc. Their shops here, (And they do have some big furniture manufacturing shops,) are all air powered, or the equipment has hydraulic motors, bandsaws etc, the shops all have infloor heating piping heated from an outside deisel engine that either powers a compressor for air, or powers a hydraulic pump that is also piped in the floor to machine outlets.
                          These conversions are very well done and very interesting.
                          They do have a system that works for them.
                          Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 04-29-2011, 07:14 PM.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          Make it fit.
                          You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I would assume after filling a propane tank with water it would be pertty safe. If really worryed, you could fill it with your favorate mig/tig shielding gas afterwards.

                            One thing iv heard however is its a pain to get rid of the oderant in the tanks. someone here mentioned a chemical that would help nullify it, but I forget what chemical it was..
                            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Drain valves

                              Originally posted by darryl
                              A few thoughts- propane tanks don't have to deal with moisture inside, so aren't coated. You might want to roll some epoxy resin around inside to at least give the bottom a coating.

                              As far as drainage goes, most any fitting I've seen protrudes upwards into the tank somewhat, so there's always going to be a pool of water left in the bottom after draining. Since I don't like those drain valves anyway, I'm going to propose simply drilling a hole, say 1/4 inch diameter or less, at the lowest point of the tank, then sealing that with a spring-loaded rubber plug or even a flat rubber washer from the outside. You can arrange a rod down the side of the tank to operate a lever which opposes the spring pressure to uncap the hole to drain the tank. In my opinion, those drain valves are awkward enough that you might tend to drain less often, and on the same hand something easy to operate from a standing position beside the tank would have you draining the tank every day or more often if humidity is high and you use lots of air. The simple catch basin would still catch the water, but you also avoid getting your hand messed up since you don't have to reach down and turn a valve right where the mess is coming out.

                              Another alternative which I thought might be good is a tube going in from the top and extending right to the bottom of the tank. The bottom of the tube would have a few notches in it where the water would flow when a valve is opened on the tube at the top. Piping would direct the expelled water into a catch can or whatever, keeping the mess away from your hand as well, and promoting a more frequent drain interval. I'm just not a fan of bending down beside the tank and reaching under to operate the drain valve, getting messed up while doing so.
                              Go and ask a truck spareparts supplier for the drain valves which most air brake equipped rigs now are fitted with . All you do is to pull a cable and the water is drained out and the spring loaded mech reseats the valve.

                              No messy hands jus a pool of crud under the tank.

                              Michael

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