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Tig welder terminology assistance please

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  • Tig welder terminology assistance please

    I have an opportunity to acquire a Lincoln Invertec V275-S DC welder...

    This is the blurb I have..." Lincoln Invertec V275-S DC welder. This welder is the newer Inverter type welder that only weighs 55 lbs and has a output range of 5-275Amps.The inverter type welder use less energy and are very light weight. I am including the v275s power source , tig torch , foot pedal ,stick welding stinger,ground cable and a gas regulator."

    I dont know the age...but it looks clean

    I was looking for a tig welder that would do aluminium, but this seller is willing to take tools in trade limiting my cash outlay, which is a big deal.

    My questions are:

    1. The info above makes the power source to be different than the machine..but I dont think it is.. is it?

    2. Anybody have any direct experience with this machine, or a cousin there of and would they recommend it?

    3. Do I really care about not being able to weld aluminium? I tend to by tool so that if I ever wanted to, I have the tool....Not the best way to buy tools (yes I know this is a question only I can truly answer).

  • #2
    1: The machine IS the power source. Unless you mean the plug in the wall, Expect to need a 50A 240v stove socket. Maybe a 30A 240v dryer socket might work (Some inverter welders can run on 120v 20A but expect MAJORLY reduced max current, like 80A if mig welders are anything to go by), Only other thing the machine does is turn on/off a gas solanoid. (Expect to buy a gas bottle+regulator seperately for a couple hundred bucks)

    2: Never used tig sorry.

    3: Welding aluminum is pertty nice.. And I would kinda consider exotic welding to be the MAJOR reason for myself to buy a tig, as such I really would'nt accept anything less then an AC tig, Idealy with all those pulse controls on the front (the high end ones have like a dozen controls! those gotta be useful for something. Lower end ones only have like 3~5 controls... likey enough for most work mind you)

    Mig can do aluminum, But from what iv seen you need a HIGH power welder due to how conductive aluminum is to heat, and it is tricky (So is tig on aluminum btw).. and needs a spool gun or push/pull gun because aluminum wire is so soft. Iv only seen MIG welding of aluminum done on like, dump trucks and such, So iv no idea if you can mig thinner aluminum sheet.

    Steel and stainless are pertty easy to do with MIG unless its super thin (thinner then 22awg) or super precise looking welds your after. Low end mig units are pertty nice too. If you allready got mig id recommend looking for a AC/DC tig. If you have experiance with TIG and MIG and don't wanna MIG steel for whatever reason, a DC tig would be nice for steel. I don't think DC tig does aluminum (AC mode needed to clean the oxides). And im not sure what other metals it will or won't do.
    Last edited by Black_Moons; 05-01-2011, 12:05 AM.
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Black_Moons
      I don't think DC tig does aluminum (AC mode needed to clean the oxides). And im not sure what other metals it will or won't do.
      I've done DC TIG on aluminum with helium as the shielding gas, but it's not a typical home-shop usage.

      Weird that an "inverter" is DC-only. If you're rectifying mains and controlling it through a power FET, you're 99% of the way to pure frequency synthesis (i.e., AC/DC/Pulse TIG). I guess it's a market segmentation deal.

      Personally, I would wait and get an AC TIG unit. Welding aluminum is so nice with TIG, and like BM says, it's a PITA with MIG.
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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      • #4
        ahh ****.. I figured it not being AC was not worth it...

        Thanks for the input..

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        • #5
          First things first

          It is GTAW - Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, TIG is an old term used post WW2, in the more recent world of welding you will find that MIG, TIG and ARC all have fancier new abbreviations rather than just the simple name. Welders will say the new terminology better explains what the process actually is.

          Rest of the stuff I have no idea
          "the ocean is the ultimate solution"

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lazlo
            I've done DC TIG on aluminum with helium as the shielding gas, but it's not a typical home-shop usage.

            Weird that an "inverter" is DC-only. If you're rectifying mains and controlling it through a power FET, you're 99% of the way to pure frequency synthesis (i.e., AC/DC/Pulse TIG). I guess it's a market segmentation deal.

            Personally, I would wait and get an AC TIG unit. Welding aluminum is so nice with TIG, and like BM says, it's a PITA with MIG.

            AC out requires another H-bridge on the output (Probably IGBT's on this machine). That adds another 1.5 to 2k to the price.

            You can always connect this thing to a spool gun. Aluminum MIG likes constant current.

            It not being AC is not a show stopper. You can weld most anything with it, Steel, Titanium, Aluminum, Tig Braze, etc. Even weld aluminum reverse polarity.
            Last edited by macona; 05-01-2011, 01:01 AM.

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            • #7
              As for spool gun aluminum welding, we just did this in class, so I might mention that it works very nicely indeed, but you gotta "rip right along" or you will blow the weld flat. A LOT faster than you think(we were working with 1/8" aluminum) but the welds looked nice.

              Doubt I would do it though, lots of extra equipment to buy, even for the miller 180 that we used.

              Might get to mess with GTAW (TIG) next week, we missed some classes due to bad weather and won't fit in as much extra stuff as was expected.

              Isn't AC with variable offset the most common type of GTAW? DC only seems odd, and perhaps limiting for "TIG", but that is all basically from the text.

              Since GTAW would be constant current, it sounds like it would also do SMAW (stick), and your description mentions that. Gives you some options, stick is pretty versatile.
              Last edited by J Tiers; 05-01-2011, 01:54 AM.
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

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              • #8
                I've actually had decent luck with a pusher MIG and aluminum wire down to .023...

                ...for things that needed a strong, but not contunuous weld. Yep, heat management's
                the booger...

                t
                rusting in Seattle

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by macona

                  It not being AC is not a show stopper. You can weld most anything with it, Steel, Titanium, Aluminum, Tig Braze, etc. Even weld aluminum reverse polarity.
                  And thats my dilemma, from what I can see, its a decent machine over all... And I really want it for the tig brazing......I have been leaning on a friend much to much to do it for me and I want the ability. Plus my little hobart is giving me trouble..and another plus.. he willing to take tools in trade...leaving me cash for extras

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                  • #10
                    I donno....I've read some of Kent White's books about welding, and spent 10 or so years welding with a GTAW in an industrial shop, welding stainless and aluminum. I've also owned and used MIG and stick welders too.

                    According to Kent, an oxyacetylene torch, the correct flux, and proper eye protection can weld aluminum much more accurately and strongly than any of the electrically applied welding. GTAW was developed for production work on mainly aircraft. It's supposed to be way faster than a guy with a pair of goggles and a gas torch...more often than not, it isn't.

                    Welding aluminum takes skill with a flame wrench...but it also takes skill with GTAW, just a different kind...
                    No good deed goes unpunished.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J Tiers
                      Doubt I would do it though, lots of extra equipment to buy, even for the miller 180 that we used.

                      Isn't AC with variable offset the most common type of GTAW? DC only seems odd, and perhaps limiting for "TIG", but that is all basically from the text.
                      The spool guns for the miller 180s are pretty cheap, only a few hundred. You use your existing regulator so you just need a bottle of argon.

                      I dont understand what you are talking about with regards to the AC. Most transformer based machines are switched with SCRs so they are limited to line frequency.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cuemaker

                        I was looking for a tig welder that would do aluminium

                        If aluminum welding is a consideration, you will need a machine with AC capability.

                        Here's one: http://cleveland.craigslist.org/tls/2282270000.html


                        To get a mental handle on the various welding processes I recommend you get a copy of Richard Finch's book: "Welder's Handbook: A complete guide......."


                        Rex

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                        • #13
                          That is a nice machine I've used them quite a bit. If the price is right and you can live without the(AC) aluminum capabilities, I'd go for it. You can more than likely get your money back out of it down the trail if you want or need something different.

                          rollin'

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                          • #14
                            Rode...

                            I am having trouble with all the Lincolns in that I cant out how thick of a material they can weld...

                            I looked at the manual..tried to read websites for each Lincoln, and unlike Miller, they really dont mention the capabilities....

                            But i did send the man an email

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                            • #15
                              Macona,

                              In a earlier post, you mentioned tig brazing...

                              I would like to be able to tig braze cast iron....How much of a machine power wise should I be looking at?

                              Thanks

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