Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Standard Modern Lathe Model 2000 just got home

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Standard Modern Lathe Model 2000 just got home

    I bought this one on an online auction and is home since yesterday. It had no chuck coming with it (someone took it home from the High School Shop) and I need to make some kind of adapter to install a 4" chuck I have from the mini-lathe 5"x12".

    Any one that can give me some pointers on how to build the adapter?
    Or any other way to attach this little chuck on a temporary basis to the spindle?

    The lather was manufactured in Mississauga-Ontario around 1972. It also has a 220Volts 3PH motor that I will be replacing with a 220 single phase since I need to run it on my own 4.5KW generator at the cottage.
    Any suggestion on a inexpensive 220 (maybe used) motor source?

    I would like to correspond with some one that has this type of lathe.

    I also have this Milling machine coming next week from Peterborough (if I can transport it home).

    Thanks, Wilson

  • #2
    Originally posted by WGonzalez2
    I need to make some kind of adapter to install a 4" chuck I have from the mini-lathe 5"x12".

    Or any other way to attach this little chuck on a temporary basis to the spindle?

    Just whip up a D1-3 adapter for the 4" chuck, or use JB Weld.


    Rex

    Comment


    • #3
      Personally I think you would be time and money ahead if you simply bought the appropriate D type adapter and a chuck. You may want to check with Anderson Tooling http://www.usedtooling.com/home.php?...ff847e883520ad to see if they may have something used that will fit your needs & budget.

      Comment


      • #4
        You can get a Chinese D1-4 adapter for $40-50 ready to go from CDCO or Shars.
        If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

        Comment


        • #5
          I have bought many an import adapter,and check them for fit with hi-spot blue against the spindle and its little taper. Haven't had 1 yet that didn't fit o.k..

          Comment


          • #6
            I advise buyind a VFD and using it on the lathe. Cheaper than a new motor,less work,and you use 1 phase power to make the 3 phase lathe variable speed.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by gwilson
              I advise buyind a VFD and using it on the lathe. Cheaper than a new motor,less work,and you use 1 phase power to make the 3 phase lathe variable speed.
              Plus the VFD comes with a lot of other features such as the ease with which you can add safety stop push buttons anywhere you want using very light wire for the connection.
              "Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel"

              Comment


              • #8
                The motor thought raises a question... Is there any technical difference between standard supply 220V and that born through his 4.5kW generator? I have read that RPC generated 3PH should not be used to run a 3PH input VFD. I know this is not what the OP would do! It just makes me wonder if the balance or whatever of the two legs from a single phase generator would cause any trouble with a typical, inexpensive VFD.
                Last edited by Arthur.Marks; 05-19-2011, 09:52 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The D Type Chuck adapter for my Standard Modern 2000 series lathe

                  Originally posted by Dr Stan
                  Personally I think you would be time and money ahead if you simply bought the appropriate D type adapter and a chuck. You may want to check with Anderson Tooling http://www.usedtooling.com/home.php?...ff847e883520ad to see if they may have something used that will fit your needs & budget.
                  Stan: Thanks, how do I know what type I have? Is there any place I can read about those adapters and their specifications? I have no manual for the lathe.

                  Thanks, Wilson

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The VFD advise...I will follow

                    Originally posted by jep24601
                    Plus the VFD comes with a lot of other features such as the ease with which you can add safety stop push buttons anywhere you want using very light wire for the connection.
                    Many thanks to all for the VFD suggestion, It saved me from the mistake of getting a single phase motor.

                    Now I was overwhelmed when I read all the replies to my original request and realized that I have been really way back lagging with new technology and specially with the terminology.
                    For example other members in this thread referred to D Type adapters; OP (???) and I have no clue as the exact information abut these term and size. I guess I grew up outside North America and every lathe had threaded spindle for the chuck.
                    Any suggestion as to books or other sources in this regard?

                    Thanks, Wilson

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you look here -
                      http://www.lathes.co.uk/latheparts/page9.html
                      At the bottom of the page there are dimensions of Camlock D fittings. By measuring you should be able to work out which one you have.

                      Michael

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That is a very fine lathe. I wish my first lathe had been any where near that good. Take care of it and it will last you forever. Keep it oiled.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          How sensitive is a VFD to frequency and voltage fluctuations on the incoming power? A 4.5 kilowatt generator will exhibit large changes in both as the load varies. 4.5 kw is barely enough to handle the starting loads of a 2 or 3 hp motor. I suspect the VFD will declare an undervoltage fault when starting.

                          As for good deals on motors in Canada, Princess Auto is the place to shop. I recently bought a single phase 3 hp cap start/cap run motor there for $100. It was on a half price sale.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Evan - Variation in frequency and voltage has much more to do with how you define what a 4.5kw generator is. On the average box store generator, where 4.5kw is the maximum rating at an intermittent rating (think low duty cycle), fluctuations will occur as you say. The thing to keep in mind though, is that these generators arent meant to run for very many hours at a time, and are more suited for the jobsite, campsite, rv with batteries etc. A real backup power generator (no box stores and big bucks) that is 4.5kw is physically about four times the size (normally about the size of a medium sized dog house), and usually comes with a continuous rating (99+% duty cycle). They also typically have a peak of around 7.5-10kw intermittent on a 4.5kw sized rating. Much larger engine = much less fluctuation due to that size load, so no problems. He mentioned being at a cottage, which makes me think it might be a larger, backup power sized generator being used.
                            "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Those are beautiful little lathes - they were the choice of training facilities for years, a 'QUALITY CANADIAN MADE PRODUCT'.

                              The spindle is D1-3, and the parts are still supported.

                              You can put a 1 1/2 hP single phase motor and that will draw ~~ 20 Amp @ 110 v, or 11A @ 220v - or ~~ 2300 watts. You need to allow for 'In Rush' when you switch it on.

                              Pat

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X