Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

111 Trichloroethane

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Keith Krome
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan
    Diethyl ether strongly inhibits the production of alcohol dehydrogenase in the liver. For someone that is already a habitual drinker this can cause severe alcohol toxicity in the liver resulting in failure.

    Gotcha. I wasn't clear that it was ether and alcohol. Curious though, they used to mix ethyl ether with alcohol and drink it (I understand it was very little ether to alcohol). Once again, combining chemicals haphazardly can be a very bad thing.

    Edit: ("they" being, people back in the day)

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Diethyl ether strongly inhibits the production of alcohol dehydrogenase in the liver. For someone that is already a habitual drinker this can cause severe alcohol toxicity in the liver resulting in failure.

    Leave a comment:


  • Keith Krome
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan
    The same will happen with ether. Quite a few years ago a famous college athlete died from sniffing ether and drinking at a party. The result was immediate and complete liver failure. He was dead in a few days.

    Sorry, I have to correct you here. Diethyl ether is not toxic to the liver. There are hydrocarbons and petroleum distillates that are referred to as ether, but actual diethyl or ethyl ether is not particularly toxic. Definitely not acutely toxic. The main hazard with ethyl ether is flammability. It is very flammable.

    Tylenol is probably more toxic, especially if you've been drinking alcohol.

    CDC link for occupational health guidelines for ether:

    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/81-123/pdfs/0277.pdf

    It does state that ether might be an issue for those with reduced liver function. Makes sense, the liver helps to metabolize the ether.

    Leave a comment:


  • PeteF
    Guest replied
    This isn't the original source I saw for this article, but it will do. Makes some sobering reading of the dangers of even minute amounts of some of these chemicals when used outside their intended purposes.

    http://www.brewracingframes.com/id75.htm

    Pete

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Years ago we used that trichlor as a cleaner. It was known as "headache juice", because if you breathed much of it you'd have a roaring headache PDQ.

    I used to have a little bottle of the old tapping fluid..... worked great. yes, if you got it on aluminum, it smoked and ate the alu. Found the bottle a while back, but nothing in it anymore. Wasn't very big, I think it was a sample......no doubt it evaporated past the seal.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alan in Vermont
    replied
    I used to buy Trichlorethane by the 5 gallon can when I was foreman in a fab shop. We used it as a cutting fluid in the Hougen drills fabbing structural steel. Since the steel was to be primed after fabrication we used Trichlor because there was nothing to clean off like there was with soluble oils. Whatever you use in a Hougen has to be very "thin" so it can run through the little slot in the cutter pilot.

    Leave a comment:


  • RancherBill
    replied
    Originally posted by Sophiedoc
    Of interest if the use of trichlorethylene by German submariners in WW2 to clean barnacles off the hull.Some would pass out from the fumes leading to its use as an inhalation anesthetic(Often self administered by women delivering babies etc by a Duke inhaler which was strapped to their wrist and when they passed out their arm would drop along with the inhaler)
    In a previous life I was a medical salesman that sold, among other things, IUDs. I was calling on a Gynecologist and the topic of pain on insertion of the IUD came up. He said he had never had any problem. He got me to lie on the table and gave me the Duke Inhaler with trichlorethylene. You get so loaded the mask just falls away from your face, when you 'wake up' a little you put the mask back to your mouth.

    Deceptively simple and low tech and highly effective. He could have given me and IUD.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ram
    replied
    Used it for years in aviation cleaning plugs and components for corrosion.

    After time I built up and intolerance to it some how. In 1985 and the fumes from it sent me to the hospital with a full blown anaphylactic shock. Eyes were swelling shut, could not breath, pulse went nuts.

    I consider the stuff deadly toxic to this day and don't go near it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Fisher
    replied
    Rohart, I also enjoy the aliphatic odors, especially fresh hot tar. Wonder about Evan. Bob Fisher.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    I tested negative for hemachromatosis also. The problem with that is the test only checks for 2 genes out of 13 that can cause the condition. The two it checks only covers from 50% to 80% of the population depending on ethnic background. Regardless, my ferritin level was over 1000 and since last fall they have drained about 14 litres of blood. It's now down where it should be.

    Leave a comment:


  • rohart
    replied
    Carbon Tetrachloride was marketed as Thawpit in the UK in the fifties and sixties. Always had a bottle under the kitchen sink. Used it primarily for stain removing. Got it from the ironmongers/drysalters/hardware store.

    I suppose that was my introduction to nice smelling aliphatics. Love it. I especially enjoy the bitumen fumes when they're laying new tar-macadam (black top ?).

    Evan will say I enjoy the fumes because the carbon tet has already destroyed my brain.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Fisher
    replied
    I used to degrease things in carbon tet at GM in the early 60's. Had a 5 gallon can, poured some in a large tray and used a brush and BARE hands to degrease. On a side note, Evan, have you been tested for the hemochromotosis gene? It is sometimes known as "the celtic disease".I suffer from the same problem, just turned 75 yrs, and had my first phlebotomy. So far, tests have been negative for the condition being hereditary. I might enjoy an adult beverage or two also. Bob Fisher.

    Leave a comment:


  • RWO
    replied
    Trichloroethane works pretty well as a tapping fluid in ferrous metals. It reacts with aluminum , so is not recommneded there. The stuff is superb in vapor degreasers. I wish I had some.

    RWO

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    I'm not sure how well the Trichlorethane works as tapping fluid. Maybe somebody else can give an answer. The stuff that used to be in the tapping fluid and that I still use is Trichlorethylene.

    I'm not kidding about the ventilation. It really isn't a good idea to breathe the fumes, especially for me. I already have a bad liver from excess iron buildup. Same goes for anybody that enjoys a few too many drinks from time to time.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson
    I still use it mixed 75% trike and 25% ATF to stop it evaporating, as a tapping fluid.

    Can't get any better stuff.

    Just common sense, use sparingly as it's hard to get and don't drink the stuff.
    Oh cool!!! I have 30 of these hanging out with no use for it cept drying brake parts and firearms. I think I'll make up a lil tapping fluid and give it a try. JR

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X