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  • Bakfiets is go!

    On the road at last!


    bakfietstest2 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr


    bakfietstest by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr

    I decided to go for the Ye Olde look of the famous Raleigh Jungle Bike, I had to make a couple of more trips to the tip to get the 'right' parts and I had to make adapters for the cottered crank to fit in the frame which had been made for a one piece cranks. Eventually all the bits came together including the 3 speed Sturmy Archer hub which works very well. The SA rear axle has a weird 13/32 26TPI thread and one nut was stripped so the next task is to find a suitable nut or get really keen and make a tap. :scratch:

    The caliper brakes are really poor, the frame has lugs for cantilever brakes on the rear but the brake blocks do not line up with the rim. :scratch:

  • #2
    Nice, John. Is that your new house in the background?

    I'm guessing this will be your transport to the supermarket in Ashburton.
    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by aostling
      Nice, John. Is that your new house in the background?

      I'm guessing this will be your transport to the supermarket in Ashburton.

      Hi Allan, that is our neighbour's house, but ours is not unlike it. Yes, it should be just ideal for going to the supermarket, maybe even suitable for bringing home the fish and chips!

      Comment


      • #4
        Absolutly kool! You got a special use for a bike like that? I'm just wonder what question it answers? I haven't notice a lot of those type bikes in the neighborhood
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

        It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

        Comment


        • #5
          Backfiets are rare in the USA, more common in Europe and very common in the Netherlands.

          A couple years ago Clever Cycles in Portland Oregon began to import a few models of true, Euro-quality bikes. They are very well built, but not cheap. (the average price of a new bicycle sold in the Netherlands is something like $850 USD)
          http://clevercycles.com/products/bic...-nl-cargobike/

          Backfiets is a name-brand of one particular bicycle company, but there's many companies (in Europe) that make versions of this style of cargo bike.

          ---------

          Two more links about bikes in the Netherlands-
          http://www.ski-epic.com/amsterdam_bicycles/
          http://www.streetsblog.org/2006/10/0...in-copenhagen/

          Comment


          • #6
            Well done!

            In the States, I have often seen a small 2-wheel trailer pulled behind a bike as well as the over-sized tricycles with large wire baskets attached on the sides or back.

            I like your bike better, since you can keep an eye on your cargo and not be wondering where you lost all your stuff when you get home.
            Cheers,
            Gary

            Comment


            • #7
              Nice job!

              The caliper brakes are really poor, the frame has lugs for cantilever brakes on the rear but the brake blocks do not line up with the rim. :scratch:
              You might consider a hydraulic disc brake, as used on some mountain bikes.

              http://www.cambriabike.com/shopexd.asp?id=111017
              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DougC_582
                Backfiets are rare in the USA, more common in Europe and very common in the Netherlands.

                A couple years ago Clever Cycles in Portland Oregon began to import a few models of true, Euro-quality bikes. They are very well built, but not cheap. (the average price of a new bicycle sold in the Netherlands is something like $850 USD)
                http://clevercycles.com/products/bic...-nl-cargobike/

                Backfiets is a name-brand of one particular bicycle company, but there's many companies (in Europe) that make versions of this style of cargo bike.

                ---------

                Two more links about bikes in the Netherlands-
                http://www.ski-epic.com/amsterdam_bicycles/
                http://www.streetsblog.org/2006/10/0...in-copenhagen/
                "Bakfiets" is a Dutch word, indicating a bicycle with cargo provisions. The bakfiets is very popular with young parents to bring their kids to school.

                The average price of bicycles is a little higher as the electric assisted bicycle has a growing popularity here. Its first aim was to keep older people longer on a bicycle, now it's bought to extend the range of the journey, so the bike is a better alternative to a car. We are in a permanent traffic jam here.


                Oh, and Copenhagen is the capital of Danmark.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I could use one of those as I am about to head out to Costco on my bicycle, wondering how I am going to fit the few items into my backpack!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Off topic-your forum name.

                    My only context for bodger is from Fine Woodworking magazine. They have had several articles about spring pole lathes and green wood turning for chair making.
                    Is that what you do, or is there a wider definition of bodger?
                    Thanks,
                    Larry
                    Larry on Lake Superior

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lazlo
                      Nice job!



                      You might consider a hydraulic disc brake, as used on some mountain bikes.

                      http://www.cambriabike.com/shopexd.asp?id=111017

                      Nah! I will keep the seat low so that I can drag my feet on the ground.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ldbent
                        My only context for bodger is from Fine Woodworking magazine. They have had several articles about spring pole lathes and green wood turning for chair making.
                        Is that what you do, or is there a wider definition of bodger?
                        Thanks,
                        Larry
                        Hi Larry


                        From Dickens' Oliver Twist, "The Artful Dodger" and "bodge" derived from Middle English boccen, which means "to mend" modern meaning to do a substandard job.

                        The is another on-line user, more skilled than I, I suspect, using "Artful Bodger". I was using this nome de plume some decades before learning of the other "Artful Bodger".

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Your Old Dog
                          Absolutly kool! You got a special use for a bike like that? I'm just wonder what question it answers? I haven't notice a lot of those type bikes in the neighborhood
                          If it is a choice between the bakfiets and the pickup which should I use to go a kilometre or so to the Post Office?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have way too many ups and downs here, but I LIKE IT! Nicely done.

                            Oh... and effective brakes are good. Hope you can work them out quickly.

                            Mark

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Mark, I have a few options to explore regarding brakes but I also have to find a 13/32 26tpi (British cycle thread) nut for the rear hub, I can order one to arrive in a few days. Of course I could make a tap but I have never done that before and I do not want to make a nut that would damage the axle thread.

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