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Removing embeded lapping compound

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  • Removing embeded lapping compound

    Old tilting table - Chinese. The round bearing fit was so bad I never used it. It worked, it just offended my sensibilities. What I was thinking was using lapping compound to mate the parts; can you do that, between two iron surfaces? Can I flush/scrub the AO away after?

  • #2
    On the several occasions I have lapped, it has been easy to clean up/
    flush out. This assumes all parts can be disassembled for cleaning and flushing.
    This is more of a polishing operation than removing large variances in flatness.
    Steve

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    • #3
      The Valve grinding compound from the auto parts is supposidly water soluable. I have a lapping machine to hone compressor valves. I use diesel to wash the parts after honeing. They are blown dry and recoated with lubricant.
      Byron Boucher
      Burnet, TX

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      • #4
        It will clean off just fine. WD-40 is a good washing solvent for that.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          you can't easily removed embedded compound, that it looks washed clean means nothing. Laps work because the abrasive gets embedded in the lap which is softer than the work, if they're the same, but will get some abrasive embedded. Look into that lapping compound that's supposed to break down, name escapes me.

          On app like that this with such infrequent an undemanding use it may not matter, but they're will be abrasive embedded in the cast iron after you've washed it clean
          .

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          • #6
            Aluminum oxide is a trigonal crystal and tends not to embed. It's used in toothpaste, for example.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              Garnet lapping compound is non-imbedding. Emery, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and other abrasives will imbed and continue to cut depending on the materials being lapped.
              Jim H.

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              • #8
                Mcgyver & Jim; I got just the answers answers I was looking for, thanks. Now, to hijack my own thread. I always have used kerosine as a washing solvent. I subscribe to the branch of urban myth which claims WD-40 was developed by Convair as a Water Displacing agent and I never used it for any other purpose. Now, kerosine has gotten just as expensive so I may start using WD-40 for washing. Kerosine really dries out my hands; skin is getting thin in my old age. Someone once suggested using diesel as a cheaper alternative but I didn't care for it.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mcgyver
                  Look into that lapping compound that's supposed to break down, name escapes me.
                  "Timesaver". It's garnet, like Jim says.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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