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Wahlstrom Chuck Review

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  • Wahlstrom Chuck Review

    Tonight, I came home and my arbor was delivered. First, I put the arbor in the drill press spindle and checked the run-out. The run-out, of the arbor, was roughly 0.0005. This was checked with my cheap Horrible Fright dial indicator. (It is off roughly 0.002 over an inch, according to the dials on my Hardinge TM.)

    So, I put the Wahlstrom chuck on the arbor, and chucked up a piece of 3/16" round tool steel. The run-out is about 0.008.

    As a comparison, my Dad has an Atlas drill press with what I guess we could call a "classic" Jacob's Chuck installed. He estimates that the drill press, and chuck, are around 60 years old. We checked the run-out, on the Atlas/Jacobs chuck, and it was around 0.005.

    I am going to play around with the Wahlstrom chuck a little and see if there is any dirt or anything else, that is obvious, that is causing the problem.

    I also tried to swap the drill rod, while the drill press is running, and that works great!

    Regards,

    Brian
    There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

  • #2
    I had a look at a youtube clip of how these work and it was interesting, although the big problem that I can see is that swapping things with sharp edges (drill bits) with the machine going could be hazardous in itself. I wouldn't use one myself as unless you were really careful one day you'd get sliced.
    I haven't found an interior picture of a chuck yet, but looking at various external pics, I'm wondering whether the trade off for being able to hot swap is a slight increase in run out. There has to be some clearance to slide the sleeve up and down which would in turn mean somewhere in there there is potential for a change in alignment. I also noticed that on the pictures I saw it looked like there were 4 jaws used in the chuck which may contribute as well.
    Interesting device though. Let us know how it works for you.

    Michael

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    • #3
      .008 runout is terrible. Are you sure it is correctly mounted on the arbor?

      I just measured the runout on my $99 POS made in China 8" bench drill press. I used a ground 1/2" rod and the runout when actually running at lowest rpm is .002, same when turned by hand.
      Last edited by Evan; 06-09-2011, 12:55 AM.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        Hello,

        The arbor was clean, when I mounted it. I don't know how I could have not mounted it correctly???

        Regards,

        Brian



        Originally posted by Evan
        .008 runout is terrible. Are you sure it is correctly mounted on the arbor?

        I just measured the runout on my $99 POS made in China 8" bench drill press. I used a ground 1/2" rod and the runout when actually running at lowest rpm is .002, same when turned by hand.
        There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

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        • #5
          I've owned a couple Wahlstrom chucks -- and the runout was good. Never really found the change-on-the-go function very satisfying though. The fractional bit of time saved never seemed worth the danger when using some bits.

          Comment


          • #6
            Going by this thread below it sounds like they are good for warranty.
            http://www.machinistweb.com/forum/showthread.php?t=359

            Dave

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            • #7
              Hello,

              I sent the company an e-mail inquiring as to what the guaranteed run-out is.

              Regards,

              Brian
              There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

              Comment


              • #8
                Mine has very little runout, but it is 25 years old.
                I've drilled thousands of holes with it and never got so much as a scratch.
                Maybe I got a thick hide.

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                • #9
                  Put a Dial indicator on it and locate maximum runout, then try tapping it on the opposite side to remove 1/2 of the runout. Do this on both x and y axis.

                  It's very possible the taper fit is off and does not have good contact area so you may be able to easily remove most of the runout by tapping with a brass or aluminum drift.

                  Steve

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                  • #10
                    Thinking about it a little more, if the arbor stub was 5/10th out, that may be most of the problem, depending on where you were measuring.
                    Perhaps try this - put everything back together (including the bar you were measuring) and measure the run out just at the bar/ chuck junction. Measure the distance from the top of the chuck to your measuring point, and then measure a point twice that distance for run out. If it's the arbor (or substantially so) you would expect the run out to be double or there abouts. If you want to be really tricky, you may even be able to work out the maths and see what the chuck run out is as a proportion of the total.

                    Michael

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Rif
                      . . . So, I put the Wahlstrom chuck on the arbor, and chucked up a piece of 3/16" round tool steel. The run-out is about 0.008. . . . Brian
                      You might repeat the measurement with a 1/2" dowel pin -- could be the small shaft you're using is bent and/or the indicator stem is wobbling a bit trying to seat on the 3/16" diameter.

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                      • #12
                        Hello,

                        I checked the shaft (tool steel) on the surface plate. It is straight. I also checked the diameter, at both ends, and it is identical as per the micrometer that I used.

                        I was thinking about using a larger shaft to see if there is a difference.

                        Regards,

                        Brian


                        Originally posted by PeteM
                        You might repeat the measurement with a 1/2" dowel pin -- could be the small shaft you're using is bent and/or the indicator stem is wobbling a bit trying to seat on the 3/16" diameter.
                        There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

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                        • #13
                          Hello,

                          I just tried two things:

                          1. I found the side, with the greatest run-out, and tried tapping the metal around the arbor socket in order to shift the chuck. That didn't seem to make any difference.

                          2. I checked the run-out both close to the chuck and about 2 inches from the chuck. The run-out is 0.008 at both places. If it the run-out increased, the farther away from the chuck I measured, I would think that the arbor or socket could be crooked.

                          Maybe I should take it apart and take some more measurements?

                          Regards,

                          Brian
                          There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Either get a refund or a replacement.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                            • #15
                              May I request a follow up? I must admit, I feel a little guilty as I brought this chuck up in your original thread on the subject. Was the run-out issue resolved? If so, how? Thanks.

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