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  • Fresh cut titanium?

    Does titanium develop an oxide or similar coating as aluminum after machining? Don't remember anything about titanium from metallurgy in college. Wasn't a commonly used metal in the 50's, I guess. Someone in the aerospace field ought to know this. Only machined titanium once, and it was a learning experience for me. Thanks for any help on the subject. Bob F.

  • #2
    Yes, titanium develops an oxide coat immediately after being exposed to oxygen. As for not being commonly used in the 50's, the SR 71 and its predecessors were designed then and are made entirely from titanium.
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    • #3
      They had to develop a whole new technology to make the Blackbirds because they where made of TI. It isn't expensive because it is rare because it isn't, the cost comes from the difficulty working it.
      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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      • #4
        I've worked with titanium aircraft skins. It really is a beech to work with. It doesn't like to cut, it likes to tear.
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        • #5
          We used Kennametal KC810 & KC850 inserts to rough turn titanium helicopter rotor spindles and would finish turn them with PCBN inserts.

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          • #6
            Titanium is easily machined to a mirror finish with High speed steel. If you have difficulty it's because you don't know how.

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            • #7
              Seems to me that titanium was used long ago, not commonly, but not uncommonly. Then it became a strategic material, and now it's scarce and expensive. If I'm not mistaken, Russia and China both have significant raw material, but it's not so common in America.

              With these new advances in metal processing, we should be able to come up with TITAN, an alloy containing titanium, iron, terbium, aluminum, and niobium.

              Joking a bit of course, but is it possible we're on the verge of a materials processing revolution? Soon, we might learn how to make 'designer' materials, and use less energy to do it to boot. We'll be able to control per requirement as we jostle energy around to create the materials. The replicator on the Enterprise might not be so fantastic after all-
              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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              • #8
                Originally posted by darryl
                We'll be able to control per requirement as we jostle energy around to create the materials. The replicator on the Enterprise might not be so fantastic after all-
                Fact: the replicator never got John Luc Picard tea quite right. Once he was even quoted as saying "This replicated tea tastes like rematerialised ****"
                Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                • #9
                  Titanium is easily machined to a mirror finish with High speed steel. If you have difficulty it's because you don't know how.
                  It very much depends on the alloy and the subsequent material processing, just as it does with other metals.
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tdmidget
                    Titanium is easily machined to a mirror finish with High speed steel. If you have difficulty it's because you don't know how.
                    And the same goes for nearly every tool material and workpiece out there.
                    Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                    • #11
                      Fact: the replicator never got John Luc Picard tea quite right. Once he was even quoted as saying "This replicated tea tastes like rematerialised ****"
                      If I recall correctly, his favorite tea was Earl Grey. It tastes like s**t normally....
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                      • #12
                        'to boldly go where no man has gone before' Dumb guy, that Picard. Never figured out someone was going in his tea Replicatariously, of course.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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