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  • Aluminum question

    Hello,
    I was hoping someone could expound on a question I had about aluminum.

    I understand there are different ways to form aluminum. The ways that come to mind are casting, machining, forging, extrusion, welding, & cutting.

    Q: Are there other ways aluminum is formed?

  • #2
    How about sintering powdered aluminum (maybe called MIM)?

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    • #3
      I don't recall seeing sintered aluminum parts. The problem there is that if exposed to oxygen at all, even for a moment , it forms an oxide coating that will prevent sintering from working. If the powder is made in a vacuum and kept away from oxygen it will cold weld so readily that it can't be made to flow reliably into a mold. Also, aluminum powder is extremely flammable. If fine enough it will explode spontaneously if dispersed in air.

      Aluminum is also formed by hydroforming and by explosive forming. It can also be friction stir welded. Variations on explosive forming include underwater arc forming. It may also be vacuum deposited in thin layers. It is also formed by basic mechanical bending, stamping and rolling.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by Evan
        I don't recall seeing sintered aluminum parts. .
        I thought that was how Lotus treat their engine bores.

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        • #5
          Could be but I haven't heard of aluminum being used in powder metallurgy.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #6
            Don't forget "billet"

            Seriously there's also rolling, sheet and plate processes like development: fabrication, spinning, drawing, HER processing, spray and plasma deposition - um - I'm out of bullets. Come to think of it these ae mostly post inititial form processing as in ingot onto sheet or plate, then fab, spinning etc.

            Nope. Dry hole here.
            Last edited by Forrest Addy; 06-16-2011, 05:21 AM.

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            • #7
              And spinning!

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              • #8
                My favorite all time forming process is stamping. There is just something about seeing the giant presses slamming down that gets me going every time.
                "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                • #9
                  I like to crush Aluminum cans in my hand (manu-forming), or sometimes stomp them flat (pedi-forming).
                  Gary


                  Appearance is Everything...

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                  • #10
                    I like to crush Aluminum cans in my hand (manu-forming), or sometimes stomp them flat (pedi-forming).
                    How about cranial-forming?
                    Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by flathead4
                      How about cranial-forming?

                      Just gives me a headache.......
                      Gary


                      Appearance is Everything...

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                      • #12
                        p metallurgy, you can do ali if you have the urge
                        http://www.smt.sandvik.com/osprey
                        also, superplastic forming [morgan wings]
                        mark

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                        • #13
                          Hammering, burnishing, chemical milling, ion beam welding and cutting and of course injection molding.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            The Sandvik page doesn't say anything about powder metallurgy with aluminimum.

                            Only:
                            Austenitic Stainless Steels
                            Martensitic Stainless Steels
                            Ferritic Stainless Steels
                            Precipitation Hardening Stainless Steels

                            Low Alloy Steels
                            High Speed & Tool Steels
                            Duplex Stainless Steels
                            Super-Duplex Stainless Steels
                            Nickel Based Alloys
                            http://www.smt.sandvik.com/sandvik/0...ta%20sheet.pdf
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                            • #15
                              Aluminum powder metallurgy has been around for quite a while:

                              http://www.metalpowder.com/index.asp...rials_aluminum

                              http://www.aluminum.org/Content/Navi...Metallurgy.PDF
                              Jim H.

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