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  • 10,000 Year Clock

    I'm not home or on this forum all that much due to work so the link to this clock may have been posted here before. [url]http://www.wired.com/gagetlab/2011/06/10000-year-clock/a
    if I posted the link correctly. A buddy of mine in Texas sent me the link to this (thanks Joe) A mind boggling effort if you consider even just some of the design,engineering, enviroment and machining challenges. It doesn't matter if your interested in clocks or not, It would be extremely doubtful that there's a member on this forum that wouldn't be impressed with the work done so far. Edit, OK I just tried the URL, It's posted wrong, Can somebody with some skills help this computer moron out?

    Pete
    Last edited by uncle pete; 06-26-2011, 04:58 PM.

  • #2
    I presume that is the effort of the Long Now Society. I have posted about them but not recently. Their mission is to promote forward thinking. Not just to next year or even just in your lifetime but for the distant future. They are very concerned about the preservation of knowledge in the very long term.

    Here is their home page: http://longnow.org/
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      Evan, Yeah your 100% right. A lot of their thoughts align closely with my disjointed and not very articulate ones.

      Pete

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      • #4
        How is the weather up there now? We are still waiting for summer to begin here.


        The idea of preserving information is especially important now. The great majority of our knowlege is being converted to highly perishable forms that are only computer readable. If something happens to set our civilization back a few hundred years much of what we have learned in the last 20 to 50 years will be lost.

        An example of such a catastrophe was the destruction of the Library of Alexandria around 30 BC. Little is known about the actual contents but it was an enormous collection of writings and knowledge that was collected from all over the then known civilized world.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          Permenant memory??

          The company I worked for in the 80s burned data to large optical drives.. would not overwrite, just spiral write, could read all data back thou. I am not sure how that worked, but I am sure.. somewhere there is a electrical drawing I was working on on autocad 3.? still hanging there in the ether. (lost in space)

          I've had music on records, 8 track tapes, cassette tapes, cdroms, now hard drives.

          Technical Forums, if you see something you like, you'd better save it to pdf on your own machine. OVER and over I see them lose information.. Over and over I see "plagiarized" information reappear on places for sale.. the OLD data you see on ebay all the time. I've suspected a couple of "crashing" the data to make it more valuable.

          A forum is not a library, but a disc spinning somewhere in the distance at 8200rpm.
          Excuse me, I farted.

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          • #6
            A lot of folks tend to view television as a medium for mindless idiots, and maybe that's true, to some extent. But in the last few years, with so many new and varied channels available, especially on Directv, some dedicated mostly to showing educational and and historical info, my perception of ancient times, and even the last three or four centuries, has been totally altered.

            It has been a real eye opener for me to come to realize just how sophisticated many of those societies were, in terms of engineering and construction and fabrication skills. Much of what I see sometimes makes me wonder if we could even begin to duplicate it today. Especially with OSHA and all the other government watchdogs breathing down the necks of any who tried.

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            • #7
              Evan,
              The mine tends to get our own weather patterns as were around 4,000 ft in elevation and at the head end of a few long valleys. I flew in on June 7th and then out on the 21st. Mostly showers every day but we did have a few snow flakes. Sping is really delayed up there. Even the Grizzlys are looking pretty thin right now. Very few flowers yet so even the bees are hurting.

              Everbodys points about our information storage systems today are dead on. It's a historicly proven fact that it's a really bad idea to put all your eggs in one basket. I can understand and appreciate the use of computers for storage but that doesn't nessisarily make it a great idea. Evans example of the Alexandria library proves that point. The loss of historical information is well documented and happened due to various reasons starting with no written language at the time thru the dark ages when the religious fanatics really set things backward. Even during the steam age huge blocks of historical facts are gone or only partial ammounts left. Were still losing information every day due to acidic paper, Storage conditions ect. An EMP pulse today would almost put us into stone age conditions within a week. But I'm certainly not smart enough to come up with an answer to the problems. I dunno, Maybe go back to those stone tablets? That doesn't solve the issues with our reliance on computer controlled energy supplies and about everything else you can imagine.

              Pete
              Last edited by uncle pete; 06-26-2011, 06:06 PM.

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              • #8
                I've been watching the clock of the Long Now project for several years. It is really good to see that they now have some financial backing, and the project is now actually being realized.

                This link points to a multi-page article with some nice closeups of the clock escapement and several other details of construction: http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2011/...-year-clock/1/

                This link at the Long Now website deals with the construction progress: http://www.10000yearclock.net/learnmore.html

                The original Wired article Pete was trying to link to is here: http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyo...y-building-it/
                Last edited by Sleazey; 06-26-2011, 06:20 PM.

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                • #9
                  I'm not convinced guys. Call me a cynic, but this seems like another project of a bored billionaire (Jeff Bezos) like Larry's billet Cobra. Certainly an impressive design, but what information are they preserving?

                  The main article is here, and when Jeff Bezos funded the project, he completely overshadowed Danny Hill, the inventor.

                  http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2011/...00-year-clock/
                  "To help achieve his mission of fostering long-term thinking, Bezos last week launched a website to publicize his clock. People who want to visit the clock once it’s ready can put their names on a waiting list on the site — although they’ll have to be prepared to wait, as the clock won’t be complete for years."

                  Any bets on whether the mechanism will actually run for 10,000 years?
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Evan
                    The idea of preserving information is especially important now. The great majority of our knowlege is being converted to highly perishable forms that are only computer readable. If something happens to set our civilization back a few hundred years much of what we have learned in the last 20 to 50 years will be lost.

                    An example of such a catastrophe was the destruction of the Library of Alexandria around 30 BC. Little is known about the actual contents but it was an enormous collection of writings and knowledge that was collected from all over the then known civilized world.
                    Seems like it hasn't really mattered.

                    I doubt that it will.
                    Gene

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                    • #11
                      It is impossible to say what difference it may have made. What if the "Dark Ages" had never happened? How much high technology was lost? The Antikythera mechanism information may have been in that library and who knows how much similar information?
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        While I can appreciate some of the negitives already mentioned, To me the amazing fact is that our technology has advanced to the point that something like it can even be attempted and that it could possibly operate for the expected life span. I also have my doubts that it can, But it's nice to see it at least tried. The preservation of information are some the other goals for a lot of the people involved in this project and not nessisarily directly related to it. One of the basic priciples in the building of this clock was to get people thinking and talking about the future, This thread already shows that those involved with this clock had a good idea.

                        Evan brings up a very good point about what our world would be today without the Dark Ages or the loss of that library.

                        Pete
                        Last edited by uncle pete; 06-26-2011, 07:39 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Evan
                          It is impossible to say what difference it may have made. What if the "Dark Ages" had never happened? How much high technology was lost?
                          I agree with Evan -- the loss of the Royal Library of Alexandria was tragic. From various Arabic literature, we know that Hero was one of many principal engineers there, and documented, among many other inventions, his primitive steam turbine. The Antikythera mechanism is about the right time -- Caesar accidentally set fire to the library in 48 BC, and the Antikythera is dated 100 - 150 BC.

                          But really, is any of the technology used in the "Bezos'" clock really relevant to humankind's technical achievements?
                          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                          • #14
                            A really interesting book with a similar concept of a long running clock is 'Anathem' , by Neal Stephenson. The early part of the book spent a lot of time on it and was, at least to me, fascinating. Somewhere along the way the plot shifts away from the geographical location of the clock and you don't hear anymore about it but the rest of the book is highly interesting.

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                            • #15
                              It will run as long as it takes for some meth heads and illegal aliens to cut it up for scrap.
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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