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Spotting Drill to drill

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  • Boucher
    replied
    Enco has some carbide mill/drills that have worked well for me in a similar situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank Ford
    replied
    I have an occasion to drill holes like that, and I've had great success with the
    "body drills" from McMaster-Carr. 1/8" ones are less than two bucks each for double ended drills. I like the double end because the flutes are shorter so it's a bit stiffer. Split point means they don't wander, and max hole depth is around 1/2 inch.

    McMaster-Carr # 3163A54

    Leave a comment:


  • BadDog
    replied
    Originally posted by mochinist
    it will probably work, but the better way in my opinion would be to use a stub drill or make your own stub drill out of regular length drill bit, and just forget about using the spot drill to start the hole, the shortened drill will hold location fine for a drilled hole.
    I agree. In aluminum, I usually just use 4 facet web-thinned "stubbies" or split point "screw length" with no spot needed. I wouldn't want to use a spot drill with any thickness more than something like 16 ga. as it's got no clearance and no chip handling ability.

    Leave a comment:


  • bobw53
    replied
    Check the flutes on a spot drill and compare them to a "regular" drill.

    There is no relief, so once you get past the point, you're rubbing.

    Can you, yes... Should you, No. Have I? Of course, I've also twisted off a
    5/8" spotter that seized in an aluminum hole, not even very deep.

    I'm more comfortable using a spot drill improperly in steel than aluminum, it melts at a much higher temperature.

    If you're looking at 1/8", check out the carbide circuit board drills, you'll be able to just slam through it, and they are pretty reasonable priced.

    If its a need to do it now and this is what you have on hand, just make sure you are lubed up, surface speed is going to be pretty low with such a small drill anyway, 98% chance you'll be OK.

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  • smalltime
    replied
    Should be just fine.

    Just back off on the feedrate, spotters have a very thin chisel point, and this can be chipped easily.

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  • mochinist
    replied
    it will probably work, but the better way in my opinion would be to use a stub drill or make your own stub drill out of regular length drill bit, and just forget about using the spot drill to start the hole, the shortened drill will hold location fine for a drilled hole.

    Leave a comment:


  • macona
    replied
    I use spotting drills for thin stuff quite often.

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  • Toolguy
    replied
    Drill

    You will need some kind of cutting fluid or the drill will seize up and snap off.

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  • Bob Ford
    replied
    If the flute length is long enough I see no problem.

    Bob

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic Spotting Drill to drill

    Spotting Drill to drill

    Can I drill with a 90 1/8 spotting drill right through 1/8 6061. I'm drilling about 48 holes every 1/4" for an indexing bar? I'll be chucking the spotting drill right in an 1/8 R8 collet. All comments appreciated except the ones about my hairline.
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