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T-Slot Nut Confusion

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  • T-Slot Nut Confusion

    I am on MSC wanting to get some new T-Slot nuts and wow so many differant sizes.How do you measure them? Slot Width-Slot Height-Overall Height.



  • #2
    Grab a piece of steel and make them.

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    • #3
      You just make them. Start with a piece of stock long enough to make as many as you need, wide enough to fit in the slot, and tall enough to do the job, then hog out the parts that keep it from looking like a T in cross section. Drill, tap, cut to length.

      Extra points if you don't tap completely through so the anchor bolts don't pass all the way through. That's so you don't tear out your t-slot with the nut by running the bolt into the bottom of the slot

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      • #4
        T Slots

        Usually you go by what size bolt will fit loosely in the top of the slot. Get T nuts threaded for that size.

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        • #5
          Get some 1 inch wide by 3/8 thick bar, cut pieces 1 inch long. Mark center, drill and tap for 1/2 inch threaded rod. Done.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            Yours should be for 5/8" slot (width of the slot as on your first photo). They're, usually, threaded for 1/2"-13 studs.
            Last edited by MichaelP; 07-02-2011, 10:46 PM.
            Mike
            WI/IL border, USA

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            • #7
              I found how how ya measure them on the ENCO website.ABCDE dementions.At $4.24 per 10 i would rather buy them then
              take several hours trying to save a couple bucks...LOL!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by texjames
                I found how how ya measure them on the ENCO website.ABCDE dementions.At $4.24 per 10 i would rather buy them then
                take several hours trying to save a couple bucks...LOL!
                Surely you jest! Spending hours designing, finding suitable stock, and making something you could buy cheaply is what a lot of hobby machining is all about. Extra points if you figure out how to make it a little different from the way everybody else makes it!

                And sometimes the store-bought parts don't quite fit and you have to machine them anyway. (Actually, the shop made ones sometimes don't quite fit and you have to (re)-machine them, tool!)
                Don Young

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by texjames
                  I found how how ya measure them on the ENCO website.ABCDE dementions.At $4.24 per 10 i would rather buy them then
                  take several hours trying to save a couple bucks...LOL!
                  x2 on what Don Young said, but to add...

                  If it takes you several hours to make 10 of them, then you should make them for practice. Many choose to skip the easy projects in favor of the complex ones, then never complete the complex ones because they realize they havent developed the basic skills necessary. Im admittedly slow when it comes to most machine operations, and I doubt it would take me 30 mins to make 10 of them.
                  "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                  • #10
                    10 T-nuts in 30 minutes seems pretty optimistic to me, but I'm no professional machinist. It would probably take my 4x6 bandsaw at least 30 minutes just to cut the blanks apart after machining the rabbets.
                    ----------
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Don Young
                      Surely you jest! Spending hours designing, finding suitable stock, and making something you could buy cheaply is what a lot of hobby machining is all about. Extra points if you figure out how to make it a little different from the way everybody else makes it!

                      And sometimes the store-bought parts don't quite fit and you have to machine them anyway. (Actually, the shop made ones sometimes don't quite fit and you have to (re)-machine them, tool!)
                      Heh, Iv got a few store bought T nuts that are ever so slightly too wide to fit my table. (By about 1~2mm) while others from the same set fit fine.

                      Extra long T-nuts that fit JUST right to the root of the slot, are a great way to reduce chance of damaging table.

                      for my compound, I used an angle grinder to grind heavy hex head bolts into T head bolts with a slight curve, Fit about 10x better then the stock T head bolts, about 2x+ the griping area, and being grade 8 (Imperial) are not gonna strip so damn easy as the stock ones. Then made some extra heavy duty washers to go under the nuts. Then had to grind a little off one side of the washer to make it fit.

                      Best of all, its one of those weird imperial sizes that you can use a metric wrench on, One of the combo wrenchs that came with and sits next to my lathe infact. This saves me from having to mill/grind down a nut
                      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                      • #12
                        TEE nut 101

                        Personally if I could buy them at <$5 for 10 i would BUT it does pay to make some for specials etc and it doesn't take that long.

                        Now the T nuts in question are 5/8" wide and as said usually take a 1/2" x 13 stud but what happens if you want to bolt a part down on the bed that has 3/8" holes in it ?

                        Answer is to get the stick of T bar material you made earlier and belt a couple of tapped 3/8" holes in or even 5/16" to get better placement [ if needed ]

                        Making T nuts is dead basic, you can usually but a length of stock material what is wide enough and high enough for the job, then cut this into lengths 2" longer then your vise is wide. Reason for this is it's about the maximum length you can get without support or using two vises, 1" overhang either side is neither here nor there and that's at least 2 extra nuts.

                        Then work out how deep and how wide the cut needs to be to remove the unwanted section on one side. Then place this in the vise on parallels so it can be cut without hitting the jaws. Helps to mark off the shape on the end using a fat marker pen and scriber.

                        Now remove this material, at what rate depends on your machine but something like a Bridgeport [ hawk, spit - ding ] will do it in one pass, don't climb mill but go against the cutter so that determines what side and direction you need to travel.

                        Once this side is cut, remove the material from the vise and turn round and repeat. If you are cutting in one pass this aves having to setup on the other side.

                        So basically cut up one side, return, turn job round, take second cut - job done.

                        Remove from vise, deburr and throw into drawer of clamps and studs for later.

                        If you can't do that in 15 minutes then take up knitting.
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                        • #13
                          Split T Nuts

                          As long as you are going to be in production mode you might make a few more and split them along the central axis with a slitting saw (cut in two along the vertical axis. From an end view looking down the T slot each half will look like the letter L with one side mirroring the other).

                          These come in handy when you have already set up your project with an array of strap clamps and suddenly decide that you need to place one more between two others which are already in place. Rather than disassemble the set up in order to slide another T nut in use the spilt nuts. Drop half of one in first from the top of the T slot then the other and rejoin them so the tapped hole is once again centered with both halves. If you do this be sure to stamp a number on each half of each nut you make so they won't get mixed up (EDIT: each half of each nut will have the same number) - the threads won't align from halves of different nuts.
                          Last edited by DATo; 07-03-2011, 07:15 PM.

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                          • #14
                            I"ll join the ranks of the others who don't know the answer to your question and tell you to just make'em

                            What you need to do is "simply" grab a piece of railroad track, spend three days grinding it to approximate size, chuck what's left of it in the mill and lock it down using your T-nuts.........oh wait, you don't have t-nuts yet? Find a friend who does and ask to borrow his mill so you can mill your stock!! At some point you may decide it just ain't worth the grief!

                            Actually, I have seen specs for them somewhere. Either check the machinist manual or try MSC and see if they have a drawing of the product along with measurements. I'm sure I've seen it in one of those places. Sorry I can't offer more help accept to say I didn't and wouldn't make mine. The kit you get from the suppliers like Enco is pretty handy as it includes the step wedges and I use them all the time even on the drill press. It's the best $60.00 or so I"ve spent on tooling.
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                            • #15
                              I've made them before, so I know how. Nowadays, I prefer to buy Teco if I can find them cheap. Recently, I did get a complete set of Teco brand T-nuts, studs, flange nuts and step blocks for $15. These are the smaller 7/16" (at the top) dimension with 3/8" threads, and they fit the rotary table. It's used, but you can hardly tell.

                              There is no way on God's green earth that I could get all the quality material for $15 or less and make a set of this caliber, even if my time and tooling is free. It would require rolled threads on the the studs, T-nuts that the threads do not go all the way through (on purpose), beautifully finished flange nuts, and step blocks that mate nice & smooth and do not bust the teeth off of each other.

                              But making stuff is fun too. I *really* like that idea of split T-nuts! For that, I'd go make some.

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