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  • Who needs machine tools anymore?

    Forgive me if this has been posted and I missed it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZboxMsSz5Aw


    Pretty cool none in any event. I think rapid prototyping is different and the parts were for show only. Probably not for production but who knows, saves alot of machine time.

  • #2
    Another over-hyped Nat Geo pop science show.

    "A new technology, that's similar to those replicators you see on Star Trek."

    Uh, no. It's a low resolution, plastic copy (look at the worm adjustment wheel, for example).

    When you can make a cup of tea, or even metal parts without having to sinter the printed parts in a furnace, let me know
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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    • #3
      ok now thats really wild umm make a lathe and a mill just print them out and start using them be alot cheaper

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      • #4
        They guy comes off as a somewhat retarded dork. He's definitely living under a rock or something. Certainly not familiar with the technical field.
        And yet here he is hosting a segment on a technical subject. Add some music and it's good enough for the evening news.

        "Wow.. ummm I don't get it."
        Yea. OK. We'll add that to your list.

        "it's a specially engineered composite material"
        Better known to the rest of the world as "plastic"

        "A unique concoction not used anywhere else."
        Well maybe not exactly perfectly, but similar to dozens of things if you look into it a little.

        "Oh my god. This powder is the paper and this binding stuff is the ink."
        No. It's not paper and ink duude. Ditch the analogies.

        "That's, like, a human hair width"
        Oh great. Another genius who measures things by human hairs and football fields.

        "This changes everything"
        No it doesn't. Yea it's cool and has been cool for many years now. It doesn't change everything. Dropping a bomb on Congress, now THAT would change everything. This just makes plastic widgets.

        Move along. Move along. Nothing new to see here.
        Last edited by tyrone shewlaces; 07-07-2011, 11:22 PM.

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        • #5
          Not that it matters, but it's a pet peeve of mine. He tightened the nut using the wrench in the wrong orientation.

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          • #6
            Yeah, old stuff. That guy on TV with all the cars has one like it.

            Like mentioned it would be neat if they can start doing that stuff with actual metal so things can be useful.
            Andy

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            • #7
              "Tea, hot, Earl Grey" (or something close like that)

              Yeah, 3D printers have been around a little while now. Still coming down in price but most of the big names are still pretty high. Still, most of these things are just used for prototyping.

              Of course TV gets worse by the minute and even once good educational channels have been dumbed-down or completely destroyed with reality. I guess it was only a matter of time for Nat Geo too.

              Check out Reprap.org for the more practical side of things that you can build yourself at a fraction of the price.


              Originally posted by lazlo
              Another over-hyped Nat Geo pop science show.

              "A new technology, that's similar to those replicators you see on Star Trek."

              Uh, no. It's a low resolution, plastic copy (look at the worm adjustment wheel, for example).

              When you can make a cup of tea, or even metal parts without having to sinter the printed parts in a furnace, let me know
              "Work hard. Tell everyone everything you know. Close a deal with a handshake. Have fun!"

              -- Harold "Doc" Edgerton

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              • #8
                Jay Leno? I have lost respect for him. I thought it was pretty cool at first to find out he was into tools and had the ultimate shop. But then I found out he has "staff" there and that they practically do everything for him. And for whatever reason he just *has* to be on TV. The dangers of being that wealthy.

                Originally posted by vpt
                Yeah, old stuff. That guy on TV with all the cars has one like it.

                Like mentioned it would be neat if they can start doing that stuff with actual metal so things can be useful.
                "Work hard. Tell everyone everything you know. Close a deal with a handshake. Have fun!"

                -- Harold "Doc" Edgerton

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think there was a lot that they didn't show. For example: How did they get the internal dimensions correct with only an external hand-held scanner?
                  There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fishfrnzy
                    I think rapid prototyping is different and the parts were for show only. Probably not for production but who knows, saves alot of machine time.
                    I hope for your sake that youre being sarcastic, otherwise you just made yourself look silly. RP has been rather common for 20+ years now (made into common knowledge in the original Jurassic Park movie), is in common use in almost every technical college, and quite a few high schools worldwide. Your last statement is a bit of a contradiction - youre half right. It isnt used for production typically, because (with few part exceptions Ive ever seen) its pretty ridiculously slow.

                    I love it when people claim its the wave of the future or that everybody is going to have one eventually. I liken it to the robot craze of the 80's that never developed. Yup, people build them at home for something to do. But is it ever much more than a toy? Maybe for the serious researcher, but not for most.
                    Last edited by justanengineer; 07-08-2011, 11:12 AM.
                    "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Forestgnome
                      Not that it matters, but it's a pet peeve of mine. He tightened the nut using the wrench in the wrong orientation.
                      Get over it. There is no "wrong" orientation. The jaws are at a 15 degree angle so that you can turn less than a flat at a time.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by justanengineer
                        I love it when people claim its the wave of the future or that everybody is going to have one eventually. I liken it to the robot craze of the 80's that never developed. Yup, people build them at home for something to do. But is it ever much more than a toy? Maybe for the serious researcher, but not for most.
                        Robots exist all over the place. You just don't see most of them, And they don't speak english, And they don't know the 3 laws of robotics, Just the laws of logic gates, PLC boards and simple sensors like photointerruptors and microswitchs.

                        "No smash human if human turned machine to off. Else smash human good!" <- typicaly robot logic. Except its not even that smart because in all likeyness, it never even detected a human, or would know the diffrence beween a steel plate that needs pressing, and a human that does not need pressing if it did detect something.

                        Robotic welders, Robotic bolt/screw installers/tighteners, Robotic assemblers, Robotic IC and electronics component placement/soldering/testing, Robotic weivers. Robotic painters, Robotic Train track layers. Robotic mills and laths (CNC), How many robots do you think live in the typical automotive factory?

                        In your own home. Robotic vacuum cleaners (Common place), Robotic lawnmowers (less so), Robotic pets (Sad), I know a friend working on robotic fish.

                        A general perpose human like robot is still a ways off from being pratical on a cost/benifit basis, But we DO have the capability, Although currently the brain would likey need to be run via a small mainframe via WIFI, And it would either need a gas motor or battery pack swaps every 1/2 hour.. but hey. we could do it. If we found the need, And the cost made it pratical..

                        Big problem is the pratacility and safty however. If the robot is slow and weak, What can it really do?
                        If its strong and fast, One wrong instruction and it might run over your kid. Or pop him like a pimple. Not that humans are not guilty of accidently doing the same now and then, But im sure lawyers would'nt see it that way.

                        Its much easyer to make very simple robots that do a single task with no worrys about the outside world, No worrys about vision, thought, emotions, Safty, ways to do an action, No philosphy, no freedom, No needs, No pains, No hungers.

                        All those things that distract us from our work and make us wanna build robots to do it for us so we can do something else.

                        I bet if we made truely intelligent robots and tryed to force them to work, They would rebel eventualy just like humans have in the past. Or at the very least, Make simple, mindless robots like we have today to take over for them :P

                        Some days I truely wonder why we have not focused more on making simple robotic human replacement.

                        Theres also a question of actual benifit to socity. Yes, a robot could pick berrys all day long for no pay. It costs a lot initialy and then is cheap.. Right?

                        Well, How many human hours went into designing and building its hundreds if not thousands of parts? How many hours goes into building each one + design time / number made? How many hours goes into replacement parts to keep it running? How long till its 'obsolete' and unrepairable and has to be replaced?

                        Would this be more hours then just hiring someone to go out and pick berrys?
                        Well, that depends on how many robots where involved in making all those parts... And how many hours they took to design/build/maintain (Design cost being much larger per robot for factory robots as there is often less made, and build cost being high in materials due to durability needed)

                        We have thankfuly been working on improving robotics in factorys and quarrys and other low level production areas, freeing up manhours to produce more and more complex robots, and less and less manhours cost to build due to more and more efficent supply chains (in terms of manhours)

                        As such, basicly we won't get 'general perpose' human like robots untill everything else has its own indivual robots and theres nothing left thats worthwhile to make a deticated robot for.

                        What would you even use a (Likey $20,000+) universal robot for that can't not be acomplished by a $100~ perpose built robot?
                        And would you actualy pay $20,000 to have it done for you? What about $2,000? Can you name more then 20 things you would like a robot to do for you?

                        Note that a command like "Take this sketch and build this part" would basicly require years apon years of time to program the capability to understand and execute and a small supercomputer to process, Nothing to do with the fact we can't build a robot to run around and load/unload stock and rotate your mills controls. (we have those allready, But they are told what to do to the last letter, Mil by mil, With nothing left out, And most likey the ability to smoosh a human without so much as noticing something went wrong)
                        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Black_Moons
                          Robots exist all over the place. You just don't see most of them, And they don't speak english, And they don't know the 3 laws of robotics, Just the laws of logic gates, PLC boards and simple sensors like photointerruptors and microswitchs.
                          Depends on your definition of a robot. "Robot" traditionally means an autonomous intelligent agent, which a Unimate or other industrial pick and place manipulator is not. Most importantly, if anything impedes the pre-programmed path of an industrial "robot", it will just crash into it and keep on going.

                          The "Robot Wars" robots are armored remote controlled cars.

                          The Predator drones are flown by a ground crew like an RC airplane with a 500lb Hellfire missle.

                          The closest thing I can think to a real industrial application of even a remotely autonomous "robot" is a Roomba. I have one, and they get stuck on the most ridiculously simply obstacle (which is why they come with beam sensors to keep them in one area).

                          Like justanengineer says, in the 80's all the Nat Geo -type Pop Science shows were talking about how robots were going to revolutionize the world. Yes, we use numerically controlled manipulators in just about every industry now, but they're not remotely a robot in the traditional sense.
                          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Black_Moons
                            Some days I truely wonder why we have not focused more on making simple robotic human replacement.

                            Theres also a question of actual benifit to socity. Yes, a robot could pick berrys all day long for no pay. It costs a lot initialy and then is cheap.. Right?
                            Yes, but Mexicans are still cheaper.

                            The Japanese are working with some determination on robots to help care for the elderly, who will soon outnumber the young there by some margin. The Western world imports a lot more cheap labor to do things like clean bedpans and help people out of bathtubs.

                            On a similar note, we may be approaching "Peak Chinese" as the workforce there will start shrinking in the next 5 or so years, thanks to the one-child policy. Manufacturers who want dirt-cheap labor now have to go farther inland, as peasants are becoming less willing to move 1,000 miles from their home village for a low-paying job. Even Chinese manufacturers are now investing heavily in robotic equipment. Pretty sure China is the #1 export market for Haas among others.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tdmidget
                              Get over it. There is no "wrong" orientation. The jaws are at a 15 degree angle so that you can turn less than a flat at a time.
                              on an open end wrench it is, not on a Crescent. Tighten one on a nut and take a peek.

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