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Another shop fan bites the dust WTF? Any DIY options?

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  • sasquatch
    replied
    Beautiful old fan ted,, very nice, thanks for a great pic!!!

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  • mototed
    replied
    Older fans

    The old fans are good, but now they do have some collectors status.
    This was my grand-paws fan from the 30's-40's, I don't know when he bought it, but it was used every day. I got it from him in the 80's. Replaced the cord,lubed it up, cleaned up the brass. A few days later it sucked the curtain off the window, rod and all, and didn't stall out until it shredded most of the curtain.
    Just a funny story. Hope you find a good fan. Myself, I enjoy air conditioning.
    Ted

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  • Carld
    replied
    Just to simplify it use a 3 or 4 step pulley set up to make the speeds. I have thought about doing that for mine at times but now I use it to circulate air in the whole shop.
    Last edited by Carld; 07-09-2011, 08:04 PM.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I buy old fans at yard sales. The older the better. If they lasted 50 years thats GOOD. I give them a shot of oil and they are good to go.

    I bought 2 old rusty Edison fans at a yard sale $5 each. I had to replace the wires and cord, clean the 5 speed switch, lube the bearing then they ran like a brand new one. I repainted one fan and left the other one all rusted. I used them both for 10 years so far and they are still running great. I have about 30 fans some are from the 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, and one from the 1960s. No plastic fans or plastic parts.

    Here is my 1917 Hot Air Stirling Engine Fan made by the Al-Cool Fan Company of Chicago. It runs from the heat of a candle or oil burner.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J56D56rQV-Q


    Here is MY copy of the Al-Cool Fan that I built in my shop.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSBXcn4u4es


    Here is another Hot Air fan that I built.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBpRl...eature=related
    Last edited by gary350; 07-09-2011, 03:24 PM.

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  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by Carld
    Build your own fan.
    That's what I was thinking when I posted. My old loft shop had a 36" belt drive that was immortal. But I want something a little lighter duty than the typical 1/4 hp belt drive since I often run this thing year round just to circulate warm air from the space heater in winter, a variable speed 18-24" is about right for cfm & quietness.

    There seems to be several different way to speed control a fan, some motors have multiple coils and some can just be put on a PW dimmer. Anyone have info on this issue, or on belt vs direct?
    Last edited by gellfex; 07-09-2011, 01:36 PM.

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  • Carld
    replied
    Build your own fan. I have a shop fan that my grandfather made in the middle 1950's that has been used since that time. I had to replace the motor once and bore out the brass pillow block bearings once but it just keeps on running. The only reason I had to rework the bearings is I left it on over the weekend once . It was rattling like crazy when I can in the shop.

    It's a 36"x36" wood box with a grill on the front with bearings, blades, belt and motor all on wheels to roll around.

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  • snowman
    replied
    Originally posted by sasquatch
    ,,,,,,,,,,,,, Actually there are antique fan collectors, (probably a forum on them,) like most things.
    lol...i just got a nice westinghouse this weekend. Restoring it next weekend.

    I love the old fans...but at the same time, I have a daughter coming in October. While survival of the fittest sounds good, I'd rather not test it out on my own daughters hair or hands. The old guys aren't guarded very well :-)

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  • Gravy
    replied
    Originally posted by sasquatch
    ,,,,,,,,,,,,, Actually there are antique fan collectors, (probably a forum on them,) like most things.

    A number of those old fans are quite ornate, friend of mine just inherited two big ones, a bench model and a floor model, blades are about 24in dia, and really move air!!! (these are like shop or industry fans,) the motors on them are BIG old 1/4 HP.
    I'm not a bit surprised. My old Emerson is at least as well made as my SB lathe. I'd bet there are multiple forums with the same kind of disagreements as PM & HSM, etc.

    I had my fan humming away drying paint in my laundry room this afternoon. I just love honest well made machinery.

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  • sasquatch
    replied
    ,,,,,,,,,,,,, Actually there are antique fan collectors, (probably a forum on them,) like most things.

    A number of those old fans are quite ornate, friend of mine just inherited two big ones, a bench model and a floor model, blades are about 24in dia, and really move air!!! (these are like shop or industry fans,) the motors on them are BIG old 1/4 HP.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gravy
    replied
    Originally posted by sasquatch
    Gravy is right
    I'm gonna print this out and show it to my wife

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  • sasquatch
    replied
    Gravy is right,, some excellent old fans around cheap with decades of running still in them!!

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  • Gravy
    replied
    Old American Iron

    Go to flea markets and garage sales and antique stores until you find an ancient desk fan that weighs at least 10lbs and looks like it belongs in a Humphrey Bogart movie. It will have no plastic, and it will have oil cups and probably some rust and the remains of black enamel paint. Drive your best bargain, but if it runs at all, buy it anyway.

    You might have to clean the switch contacts and replace some wiring. It will happily chop off anything stuck into the blades. But it will move a bunch of air quietly without fuss or noise for a very long time. You will have to oil it every few months or years, depending on the length of your hot season.

    In all likelihood, it will outlast you (even if you are an under 50 youngster).

    I got my rusty ugly old Emerson desk fan back around 1978. I spent several whole hours and several whole dollars bringing it back to working condition. It has served well ever since. I think I've oiled it once or twice per decade.

    The last time I paid attention, similar fans were going for $50-$100 in decent condition at big flea markets and antique stores. If I needed another, I'd pay that in a heartbeat.

    I wish my Heavy 10 had held up as well...

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  • sasquatch
    replied
    Most bushing motors that are just dried up,(not all egg shaped/wore out,) can be dismantled then cleaned and re oiled and will run for the longest time again.

    Found a number in the landfill like that, all they needed was some cleaning and re oiling.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    They used to sell box fan kits,you got the blade hub,the shaft,a set of pillow blocks and a set of pulleys.You supplied your own plywood for the blades and box.Used to sell for $20 in the late 70's.
    I've got two in my woodshop and another one sitting on the shelf in pieces.

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  • lakeside53
    replied
    Originally posted by gellfex
    If I get no continuity at all with it switched on it means the internal thermal fuse is gone, right? This bastard is riveted shut too. I think I may have been mistaken about the bearings, it may have been the cap instead. It was struggling to start.
    "Struggling to start" can also mean a bad bearing.

    Leave a comment:

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