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  • Shop Shrapnel

    I found this today, embedded in a soft pine bookcase about 10 feet from the mill.


    Removal and closer examination revealed this:

    Yikes!

    I vaguely remember breaking an endmill some time ago. (turned the wrong handle)

    This could have has some negative effect had it struck an unprotected portion of me. I always wear my glasses while machining, but suppose this thing had gone up a nostril.
    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

  • #2
    You need to move your equipment out of the Den to the shop

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    • #3
      I had a #36 drill break one time, and embed itself in the drywall. It was about the same height and distance away that my neck was at the time. Wasn't in there deep, but probably woulda drew blood. I left it in the wall for a long time (fell out on it's own) to remind me to wear safety glasses even when drilling tiny holes with a hand drill.

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      • #4
        I have some Shrapnel in my left hand because of a hammer. I had a large 5" hex nut that would not come loose so I hit it with a 1 lb hammer several times to brake the rust loose. About the 5th hit a piece chipped off the hammer and went into my left hand like a bullet. X-Ray shows it about mid way in the center of my hand about 2" back from my center finger. It entered my hand next to my thumb so the Shrapnel traveled 2" before it came to a stop. Doctor said, lots of tiny little moving parts inside a hand it is too risky to remove it. If it gives you trouble some day you might need to have it removed. It has been in there since 1985.

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        • #5
          I smacked a hardened shaft with an engineers hammer and a tiny piece flew off and embedded itself in my tee shirt. Easily took that out, hit piece again and a bigger piece went through my shirt and buried itself about 1 1/6" deep. Was serrated and held on dearly. I guess it warned me the only way it could.
          mark costello-Low speed steel

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          • #6
            Almost similar, but totally different- was cutting a piece of laminated two sides material today and the scrap piece caught in the table saw blade and shot out backwards. From the marks on it, the last few teeth left distinct marks in the side of it, so I know that it was up to the speed of the blade rim when it passed me. It neatly chiseled out a V in another piece of wood before rebounding off the wall.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Weston Bye
              This could have has some negative effect had it struck an unprotected portion of me. I always wear my glasses while machining, but suppose this thing had gone up a nostril.
              So, you buying a set of those nostril protectors tomorrow? I think its something like a kevlar screen for each side and comes in appropriate nostril sizes. I think mine's a medium but I've seen some guys who could use the extra large.
              .
              "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Weston Bye
                I found this today, embedded in a soft pine bookcase about 10 feet from the mill.
                I always wear my glasses while machining, but suppose this thing had gone up a nostril.
                It would be known as an M2 booger?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tdmidget
                  It would be known as an M2 booger?
                  Yep, would've boogered my nose with a buggered endmill. Better than the other way round. Sounds painful either way.
                  Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                  ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by J.Ramsey
                    You need to move your equipment out of the Den to the shop
                    My shop is my den.
                    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                    • #11
                      I once saw a 3/4 HSS bit on a Pacemaker lose most of its tip when a machinist was cleaning up some welds. The chunk of bit ricocheted off the lathe and put a hole in his shirt but luckily barely drew blood. Everytime I get near a big lathe now I think of that and really wonder about the possibilities of "shooting" yourself inadvertently.
                      "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                      • #12
                        A guy in a shop where I worked had 3/4" endmill snap off at the shank on a horizontal boring mill. Hit him soundly in the middle of the forehead. He looked like Cyclops for a while thereafter.
                        Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                        ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                        • #13
                          Not exactly machining related...

                          But was working on an old pickup truck once, replacing the rear axle. After stripping out my pals 1/2" drive Craftsman ratchet, we switched to my SK ratchet and a 4' cheater bar. Everything was going fine until suddenly, BANG!, and I heard something whiz past my ear. Blew the top out of the ratchet, and the piece went through the 5/8" drywall and into the next room. Could have been really ugly if one of us had gotten in the way. I've made it a point to have a 3/4" set ever since, even though I only use it once or twice a year. Later.

                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            I have a piece of a Case 310 crawler axle imbeded in my right hand "social finger". Hit the axle with a 3 lb hammer and a piece of the case hardened layer found my finger. Same issue with the doctor and too good of a chance to screw up nerves ect. It has been there for 30 years or more. All of my glasses are polycarbonate and if I am awake they are on. So it is basicly "safety glasses" in place if I am awake.

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                            • #15
                              A long time ago, I was working as a moldmaker in a shop drilling deep coolant holes in a mold. As I recall the drill bits were 11/32” by about 18” long. In one particular hole I had to break into a cross line at about 12” deep, so I was very cautious not to feed too fast. Well it happened, the drill bit seized and shattered, sounded like a gunshot! People from the office came to see what had happened! A piece of the drill zoomed past my face and cut me. I calmly turned off the Bridgeport and walked into the break room and sat down. My boss came into the break room and asked me what the hell I was doing. I looked at him and said I’M TAKING A BREAK! I must have been an awful sight with blood streaming down my face. His tone changed and he said O.K. and left me alone. The scar was minimal but there was a lot of blood. Neal
                              Last edited by ptmachine; 07-16-2011, 05:27 PM.

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