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  • List of tooling. Whats next???

    For my Enco 13x40 gap bed:

    A set 5 indexable tool holders
    good parting tool
    MT3 5/8" chuck for the tail stock
    2 live centers

    Wants for lathe:
    Boring bar holder
    QCTP
    Threading dial

    For my Cincinatti Toolmaster
    Good asst. of 2 and 4 flute end mills
    Large set of Toolmaster collets
    MT2 collet
    MT2 1/2" chuck
    small V blocks
    large V block
    Boring head
    Boring bars
    Wiggler
    .200" spring loaded edge finder
    Starret Last word type indicater
    3 1" travel Dial indicaters with Mag bases for each
    3-2-1 blocks
    6" vice on mill table
    4" sine vice
    large box of odd cutters I picked up
    T-Nut hold down set

    Wants for mill:
    DRO
    DRO
    DRO
    height guage
    Power feed to raise the knee
    rotary table (indexing table???) you know what I mean


    What else should I be keeping my eyes open for? I know better than to buy tools I wont need but if I come across a good deal on a commonly used tool I would be a fool not to pop on it. Well what am I missing? Thanks again Keith

  • #2
    I would want to add a decent scissors style knurling tool for one, but my best advice for tooling up would be to buy what you need to accomplish the tasks you require (or desire).
    Whenever you say "Damn, I wish I had a XX", then go look into buying XX.
    Location: North Central Texas

    Comment


    • #3
      Put the QCTP right at the top of your list. The best money I've spent lately was the Phase II wedge type set. Came with boring bar holder, knurling tool, parting tool holder, and another couple tool holders. Normally around $400, I caught it on sale with a discount and free shipping for around $200 from Enco. That sped things up a lot.

      Follow that with a live center and a chuck for the tail stock.

      I don't think I would worry about the power feed on the knee. I've thought about it, but then I saw the cost and decided I don't mind cranking the handle.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah, top of all others a QTCP, that has your boring bar holder and parting tool holder with it. The lathe should come with a threading dial.

        Next is a dro. Borite sells a good set of indexable tool holders. You will need at least two chucks for the tailstock, 5/8" chucks only go down to 1/8".

        For the mill.

        Dont buy end mill sets, buy what you need, I almost never buy two flute, I get three or 4. Get a keyless chuck with a straight shank. You can probably wait on the boring head, when you do, get a good Criterion. Wigglers are meh, use an edgefinder. Skip the starrett, get a Interapid 312 and a indicol holder, Maybe 1 dial indicator, I rarely use them. Skip the sine vice, they are for grinding. Glacern makes a nice 6" vice, bought one for work.

        Move DRO up from want to need.

        Comment


        • #5
          A degausser is often overlooked but very useful. I hate working with magnetized stock or tools.
          Jacobs 18 N Super Chuck 3/32-3/4.
          Treat yourself to a first class oil can.
          Have fun, Mike
          Last edited by mf205i; 07-15-2011, 04:29 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Nobody will listen to me, but screw jacob.
            Support the forum, Buy from glacern! I got there R8 1/2" chuck. Its AWSOME. Nickel plated, No rust!, Ball bearing operation so smooth, at highest RPM if I don't tighten the drill nicely, it will fall out when I turn the mill off. Auto tool change! (hah). Never sliped on a drill yet. Still easy as silk to open after drilling 1" holes in steel like butter.
            http://www.glacern.com/drill_chucks

            My only reget? That I havent yet bought a MT3 one to fit in my lathe tailstock.

            Im a cheap bastard, But I am really loving this drill chuck. After all how much does it suck to look for that damn key? And have a drill slip reguardless how tight you tighten it? Glacern ball bearing chucks are self tightening!

            Drill chucks and vises are things you use for nearly every project, And won't wear out any time soon, Why put up with less then the best if you'll use it EVERY project?

            Unlike other expensive tooling, you won't easily damage it as a beginner either. (Well, Maybe the odd hole in your vise if you are careless)

            PS: Wheres your $20 chinese caliper and $20 micrometers? They are a must!

            As far as oil cans, Im liking the new retro style.
            http://thumbs3.ebaystatic.com/m/m51I...KHlbrA/140.jpg
            like this, But made outta plastic. About $5. Works well, lasts longer then the cheap metal can oilers with pumps. Maybe the expensive metal can oilers with pumps work better, but im cheap. And for $5 you can have one for cutting oil at each machine, and another for lubrication oil. Suprisingly easy to meter out drops or as much oil as needed.
            Last edited by Black_Moons; 07-15-2011, 06:38 AM.
            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeah, those pump oil cans never seem to last long.

              You would think ..pumping clean oil ..they would never wear out ..but they do ..and in a short amount of time

              i have a couple of these vintage ones ..they cant go wrong ..no pump

              well they look like they have a pump ..the knob just opens a door and lets the oil out ..at a steady rate



              all the best.markj

              Comment


              • #8
                macona
                I got the set of end mills as a gift from the wife. I picked up a good asst. of name brand cutters from my local tool supply. Thanks for the tip on getting a smaller chuck for my tailstock. I got the 5/8" a few months ago, I'll pick up a 1/2" next trip out. I got the wiggler and edge finder in a box of stuff an ex-boyfriend of my sister gave me. The sine vise was something that has been hanging around my shop for years. I bought a boring head just 2 days ago.

                I have been looking into QCTP's a lot lately, I have measuring chart from the manufactures website and none of the specs they list fit my machine. I'll post the dims when I get back home, I'm on the road for work until Sat. morning. Thnaks Guys Keith

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you are smart the criteria you should use is this:

                  If I can accomplish what I need to do in any other way I won't spend money on something new; instead, I need to focus on getting tools that allow me to do work that would be very difficult or impossible to do without them.

                  So instead of getting a power knee feed/lift for the mill get a boring head, instead of getting a quick change tool post for the lathe get a 4 jaw chuck and/or a quick release collet adaptor and as great a collection of collets as you can afford, instead of getting a DRO for the mill get an indexing head / rotary table. You can always get the other things later but you will severely limit what you can do NOW in your shop without the things I mentioned above.

                  When I set up my shop at home I spent a predetermined limit on my lathe and mill with the personal understanding with myself that anything else would have to be purchased from profit acquired by what I had to work with at the time. I then followed the tool selection criteria that I mention above. By the end of my first year I had made enough to repay myself for both machines as well as augment my tools considerably. Had I known this in advance I would have bought everything up front, but since I started out from a dead stop with no customers I might have made big mistake to dump, what was to me, a small fortune into a shop.

                  One of my first jobs included 2 water-cooled injection molds about 9" wide by 14" long. Each half of each mold consisted of three parts to facilitate the water jacket. I squared all the parts by hand-feeding the table, including the final assembly fly cuts for each half (.003 deep by 1" per minute finish cuts times 4 assembled platens). It was a pain in the butt to do but with the profit from that job I was able to buy a new Yuassa dividing head with a precision-adjust three jaw chuck and a power feed for the X axis of the mill. I continued to do this till my shop was entirely self sufficient.

                  If you splurge for convenience items you will cut yourself off at the knees in terms of versatility. On the other hand, if you've got the disposable cash available then go for everything now and forget everything I've said *L*
                  Last edited by DATo; 07-15-2011, 04:19 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Lathe:

                    I will completely discourage the OP from buying/getting "A set 5 indexable tool holders".

                    Cheap, yes, but still a nearly complete waste of money. The machine is big enough, new enough and has enough speed and power to run carbide insert tooling, but you'll be much more satisfied with one or two GOOD toolholders than you would be with one of those 5-piece sets of Chinese crap.

                    Once you have a quick change tool post (from Tools4Cheap.NET, btw) and know what shank size you can use, ping me and I'll help you choose a toolholder or two, and inserts. Of course you'd want a good selection of HSS tool bits too, and learn how to grind and use them (if you have not already done this.) Once you know that, you'll better-understand what carbide insert tooling can and cannot do for you.

                    Mill:

                    +1 on the Interapid (or Best Test, Mitutoyo, Compac or other) indicator over a Last Word. Been there, done that. Many people have used the LW for years and love them, for me it's the only one of dozens of Starrett tools that I've sold after buying it brand new. Starrett DOES make a good edgefinder though (I have two No.827s), and I've heard that Fisher Machine makes a good one at half the Starrett price.

                    Why would you need THREE 1" travel indicators and bases? I have have one for many years, and never really needed more. I suppose one mounted on a Mighty-Mag base for sticking on the lathe to measure Z moves is nice. Maybe 2 on Noga tall mag bases are nice if truing up a large workpiece in a 4-jaw chuck, but on a mill? I don't see it. V-blocks are good, I have 4 pairs/sizes, 2 of them in matched pairs of Starrett (No.278 and No.568), plus a homemade No.567 knockoff.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 383 240z
                      macona
                      I got the set of end mills as a gift from the wife. I picked up a good asst. of name brand cutters from my local tool supply. Thanks for the tip on getting a smaller chuck for my tailstock. I got the 5/8" a few months ago, I'll pick up a 1/2" next trip out. I got the wiggler and edge finder in a box of stuff an ex-boyfriend of my sister gave me. The sine vise was something that has been hanging around my shop for years. I bought a boring head just 2 days ago.

                      I have been looking into QCTP's a lot lately, I have measuring chart from the manufactures website and none of the specs they list fit my machine. I'll post the dims when I get back home, I'm on the road for work until Sat. morning. Thnaks Guys Keith
                      Oh, I thought that was a list of TO get not gotten.

                      You need a BXA sized post for your machine.

                      -Jerry

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PixMan
                        Lathe:

                        I will completely discourage the OP from buying/getting "A set 5 indexable tool holders".

                        Cheap, yes, but still a nearly complete waste of money. The machine is big enough, new enough and has enough speed and power to run carbide insert tooling, but you'll be much more satisfied with one or two GOOD toolholders than you would be with one of those 5-piece sets of Chinese crap.
                        Thats why I mentioned Borite, they are made in the US. I brought in a 1/2" shank set from home for work and they do a good job. They use pretty generic TPG inserts.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by macona
                          Thats why I mentioned Borite, they are made in the US. I brought in a 1/2" shank set from home for work and they do a good job. They use pretty generic TPG inserts.
                          I though Borite made...boring bars.

                          You brought your home shop cutting tools to work? I'd never do that because perishable cutting tools are part of costing a job, and the shop owner should be working that into the price and buying them.

                          I just went looking and found these:

                          http://www.boritemanufacturing.com/indexable_lathes

                          Much better quality than the Chinese sets, for sure, but I just don't think it's worth the expense because the "AR" one is going to get up to 90% of the work in most shops, the others collect dust. Those also appear to use an insert similar (but different spec) to a standard TPGT. That can make them a proprietary insert. Is there some other set there that uses a true TPG221 or TPG321 insert that uses a top clamp and has no hole?

                          I believe that one SCLCR 083D or SWLCR 083D style holder, which use 80؛ included angle CCGT32.5x or WCGT32.5x inserts are a better use of the money. One holder can turn and face without moving the holder, and you can get inserts anywhere for cheap (or spend good money for better ones.)

                          Personal preference, I guess.
                          Last edited by PixMan; 07-15-2011, 11:45 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PixMan
                            I just went looking and found these:

                            http://www.boritemanufacturing.com/indexable_lathes

                            Much better quality than the Chinese sets, for sure, but I just don't think it's worth the expense because the "AR" one is going to get up to 90% of the work in most shops, the others collect dust. Those also appear to use an insert similar (but different spec) to a standard TPGT. That can make them a proprietary insert. Is there some other set there that uses a true TPG221 or TPG321 insert that uses a top clamp and has no hole?

                            Personal preference, I guess.
                            Think Enco has a name brand USA made set that is simililar to but better than the cheap chinee 5 piece sets.

                            I want holders that have both a top clamp and a pin or screw to secure the insert. No chance of the insert pulling out on a heavy cut.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've had my eye on this type tpg tool holder from Enco. I think I want a right hand, left hand, and one with the tip straight out. They aren't real cheap, but they would use the same inserts as my favorite boring bar. The local machine shop has them and doesn't really have any complaints.

                              http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...PMAKA=422-2996

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