Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question on un-clogging Bijur oilers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question on un-clogging Bijur oilers

    I have some oilers that seem to be clogged in my DoAll surface grinder. They are the ones that oil the column and are FJB-00. I have been soaking them in acetone for a few days but it doesn't seem to be helping. Anyone have ideas on the best way to clean them? The other thing I noticed is that these are a lot smaller in size than the way oilers or crossfeed screw oilers. Is this pretty common? I believe the others are FJB-3 which is quite a few steps up. Could it also be that there isn't enough pressure in the system when it's pumped so it's all coming out the larger oilers? I guess I need to set them up individually to check and make and see if oil will pass through. If you have any other tips on working on one-shot oiling systems please pass them along.

  • #2
    Dale,
    What about using either kerosene or compressed air ?
    I have never worked on one so I might not listen to my advice? ;-)
    I would try to back flush with whatever approach you used. Disconnect the lines so you don't mess up the pump.

    Dave

    Comment


    • #3
      Acetone, alcohols, and other polar solvents will not dissolve oils or oil based goo. Try brake parts cleaner from a parts house.

      Comment


      • #4
        You don't clean them, you replace them. High Quality Tools sells them for about half of Bijur. ($6 vs $12 +/-)

        Comment


        • #5
          You may be referring to "restrictors" the little fittings that screw into the manifold that feed each individual oil line. Don't bother fixing them. The porous bronze filter integral to the inlet end cannot be reliably unclogged. They come apart and maybe you can clean them but is it worth it? The restrictors are relatively cheap. Replace them and be done with it.

          One shot machine lube systems do not run forever. 30 years is about the red shift limit. They chould be gone through one component at a time; flushed, damaged tubing replaced, restrictors replaced, support clips refurbished where needed, the pump overhauled, they underlying paint cleaned and touched up, and the reservoir cleaned. Purge and blow down each line individually working from the pump out to the final connection.

          It's a real chore but - hey! - every 30 years?

          Story: in 1967 I worked at the Navy's SRF in Guam. a Phillipine seagoing tug came in for something electronic. The vessel was an antique lovingly maintained by a crew of lifers many who served their entire careers on board. It was steam built before WWI. It was such a sight most every who could went abourd to gawk.

          Everything was recip steam from the transfer pumps to generator (still DC) to the main engine. If you've ever seen "The Sand Pebbles" where Steve McQueen tours the engine room of the "San Pablo" you have an excellent idea of the lauout for this old tug. In this tug the engine room was like the inside of a Swiss watch: spotlessly clean, flawlessly painted, fancy ropework everywhere, meticulously neat and tidy, and you could eat off the bilges. The watch-standers wore clean whites and when they came off watch there was barly a smudge on them. You get the picture. The vessel was heavily manned so there was plenty to perform the busywork necessary keeping the ship glorious.

          Anyway, to get relavent, this monsterous engine had about a million lube lines: they went everywhere snaking all over in gleaming brass and copper perfection all ranked and filed in military precision - a one shot system raised to an art form.

          It was enough to see this marvel and the pumps and generator presently in service pulsing and glittering. However, I would have loved to see that whopper of an engine run - triple expansion, four cylinders, reversing, big as a school bus, maybe 1200 HP, inefficient as hell, and utterly beautiful to a 27 year old machinist.
          Last edited by Forrest Addy; 07-21-2011, 04:34 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Monarch has some of the best prices on the flow restrictors.

            Comment


            • #7
              as was said before.. Dont waste your time. I have tore them apart and everything is so small and the filter media and screens are very fine. These are metering vaaalves so make sure you replace with the same number. It will be marked on the side. You dont want one that flows alot for something that doesnt move much. It will be wasting oil or starving the area.

              Jim

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Horst
                You don't clean them, you replace them. High Quality Tools sells them for about half of Bijur. ($6 vs $12 +/-)
                I went on their site but I couldn't locate the oil meter units. Do I need to call in or do you know if they list them on their site?

                Comment


                • #9
                  They are called "metering units" and are on the site.

                  Surface grinder grit is nasty stuff. I tried many ways to unclog them, and to no success. The check valve stops you reverse flowing them. Earlier units had a wool felt filter, not the sintered brass - the wool are impossible to clean. As an experiement, I left a set in an ultrasonic cleaner for hours - no luck.

                  On my surface grinder I added a second inline filter to stop anything that got past the main filter from getting to the metering units. Bijur sells those also.

                  If your metering units are blocked, you have crud in your lines and distribution blocks. Flush these with brake cleaner and a lot of flow.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm thinking I'm not on the correct site. I went to www.hqtinc.com and searched for metering unit(s) along with many other search wordings and come up empty handed. I see they have whole systems for sale but I can't find the replacement meters. That's an excellent idea on the filter and will have to look into it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      They more than 6$, but these people have them ---

                      http://www.bestlinepro.com/lubrication-fittings.asp
                      If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In McMaster-Carr they are called metering valves, if you change your meters you need to be VERY careful there are numbers and letters and an arrow, the smallest unit has 3 zeros (000) the largest has a 5 (5) if a 000 flows 1 drop, a 00 will flow 2 drops, a 0 will flow 4 drops, a 1 will flow 8 drops, and so forth. You can have identical looking meters but if the arrow is going the wrong direction you get nothing. Each meter is remarkable inside there are about 7 or 8 pieces, filters check valve, spring, filter, meter rod that's how they restrict the flow, I used to take them apart so I could make an adapter that I would use my Porta Power pump on I never had a line that I couldn't blow the crud out of, its amazing what 10,000 PSI can do. I also made an adapter to clean out meters that we could put acetone in and pressurize with shop air to blow thru the meters. If you have a Bijur pump with the handle you pull or push it can be taken apart and the felt filter that is on on the bottom of the pump can be removed and washed clean, we would then pump mineral spirits thru the pump till it ran clean, reassembled the unit and it was good to go. We only cleaned meters if the customer didn't want to wait for parts, never had a problem.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by macona
                          Monarch has some of the best prices on the flow restrictors.
                          What is the web address of Monarch?

                          Thanks.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dale Lusby
                            I'm thinking I'm not on the correct site. I went to www.hqtinc.com and searched for metering unit(s) along with many other search wordings and come up empty handed. I see they have whole systems for sale but I can't find the replacement meters. That's an excellent idea on the filter and will have to look into it.

                            Bijur's site ;

                            http://www.bijurdelimon.com/us/usa/p...units-352.html

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Monarch- (937)492-4111

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X