Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A folding knife I made. 1 last knife for now

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A folding knife I made. 1 last knife for now



    This is a folding knife I made for Jon,my journeyman when he retired from the shop. It is really a folding hunting knife as the blade is 3/16" thick. Quite heavy.

    Jon preferred W1 steel. I have some new old stock Brown & Sharpe W1 stock that must be from the 40's. The wrappers are very old,dirty,and falling off. I love it! I bought out the remaining stock from a company in New York that had been in business since 1908(or so). I prize old metal made during our best manufacturing days.

    The blade is 4" long,fully polished. The handles are quarter sawn legal,certified ivory(must be pre 1972).The name plate is 22 K. gold. Bolsters are German silver.

    This was hardened,and while just hot enough to hold,was put into a preheated tempering oven. This is what you need to do to get the most out of your steel. Let it cool to about 130؛. Don't let it get cold before tempering. Don't do it the next day. This is how I temper all my tool steel. It makes a big difference,especially in the life of dies and punches.

    It was brine quenched. To make a brine quench,I use distilled water(you don't know what minerals are in tap water).Dissolve ice cream salt in it until a potato will float in it.

    Brine is the best water quench. It stops the gas envelope from forming around hot steel that is plunged into it. This gas keeps the steel from hardening as evenly,so I do not use a plain water quench.

    W1 is a treacherous steel to quench,due to the rapid shock of the water based quench. Therefore,I stomped the axle hole in the blade tightly with FINE steel wool,using a flat nose punch. This keeps the hole from cracking,which is a very common problem. They used to pack holes with clay,but that keeps the steel inside the hole in large work from hardening. With steel wool,the hole will be hardened,but prevented from cracking.

    Japanese swords are given their curve in the quench. That's how bad the metal can react. It is wanted in that instance.

    Even a number or letter stamp can cause a crack in W1. I don't stamp it real deeply.

    I drew it to about 57 R.C.. W1 will get sharper than any other tool steel,which is what makes it desirable to Jon. It won't stay sharp as long as more sophisticated steels,but it will get sharper. I believe the fighting knives made for the soldiers by Kabar were W1 in WWII.

    The blade locks. Press down the finely checkered thumb piece to unlock it.

    I still can't post multiple pictures,so the next picture will show the fancy file work along the back.
    Last edited by gwilson; 07-28-2011, 03:01 PM.

  • #2
    The other view of the folding knife



    This shows the file work on the back of the knife. It may be hard to see,but I made this pattern up,because I could file the name JON into it subtly. Things like that are hard to think up,for me.It is hard sometimes to pull something extra creative out of my old head. You can make it out. It is a little towards the rear end of the knife on the back.That is,to me,the main artistic detail in this knife. The handle shape is not uncommon,but one I like. Nor is the English Bowie style blade,but it is much thicker in the back than other folding knives,except maybe custom ones.

    Note that the top of the blade is flush with the top of the back. That is the proper way a folding knife should be made,but you hardly ever see one made that way. Even the Germans seem to have abandoned,or forgotten that on their expensive knives.

    The liners are brass. The rivets are German silver,too.

    Jon has been my best friend,and I have known him over 40 years. I tried to do my best for him in his retirement gift.

    Not seen is a black leather carrying case for his belt.
    Last edited by gwilson; 07-28-2011, 03:44 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Deleted. Posts stuck together now.
      Last edited by gwilson; 07-28-2011, 04:04 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        WoW! Really nice. I have been planning to make one but as of now have not. Stuck on steam and model projects. Sure looks good to me! Fred

        Comment


        • #5
          Beautiful!!!!! Fred

          Comment


          • #6
            Beautiful work. I also like that handle design for a working knife because you can use it like a pencil to cape (if the blade has a good point) but it will stay in your hand when slick with blood. I've dressed a lot of game and butchered meat for our family so am accustomed to the performance a good knife should exhibit. Unfortunately, I have never aspired to be a knifemaker and remain in awe of work like this. Thanks for sharing.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you for your kind words. Something many might not know is that ivory does NOT get slippery when wet.

              I am not a hunter. Jon is a big hunter. He never eats store bought meat. Doesn't want the hormones they put into it. I know he will never get this knife full of blood,though!! He is hard on knives.He lost one I gave him,and broke the tip off of a never used,vintage $200.00 Puma stockman folder I got him! He leaves this one on the mantle. He makes his own knives,and uses a 4" hunting knife with a rather blunt(but sharp) bevel on the edge. I call it his potato shaped knife. At least,he can't break it on bones,etc..
              Last edited by gwilson; 07-28-2011, 10:03 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thank you,laddy. I tried to do a good job for Jon.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Whoever stuck the posts together,thank you !

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Beautiful work. I don't suspect I'll ever have the patience, much less manual dexterity, for such craft.
                    ----
                    Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I worked with a guy once many years ago that built a pocket knife that was 27" long with the blade out. It was just a GIANT pocket knife. WOW it was a monster.

                      He also made a small pocket knife that was 1" long with the blade closed. This was my favoriate.

                      I cannot tell what size your knife is?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GW
                        Whoever stuck the posts together,thank you
                        That would be GB.

                        This was hardened,and while just hot enough to hold,was put into a preheated tempering oven. This is what you need to do to get the most out of your steel. Let it cool to about 130؛. Don't let it get cold before tempering. Don't do it the next day. This is how I temper all my tool steel. It makes a big difference,especially in the life of dies and punches.
                        What that does is to prevent a full transition from austenite to martensite. That makes the steel somewhat tougher. It is form of austempering.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yes,it does make a difference,Evan. I treat all my blades that way. When I was a kid back in the 50's,Sears used to make a big deal out of calling their axes austempered. I had no idea what that meant back then!
                          Last edited by gwilson; 07-28-2011, 05:09 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Very nice! We call those Pocket Knives in Texas.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Maybe it's a beak knife. But when it's open,it gets Bicker.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X