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OT: A new way of chainsaw sharpening, on the job.

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  • OT: A new way of chainsaw sharpening, on the job.

    .


    Will this innovation alleviate a lot of dread in chainsaw sharpening?
    A sharp saw in seconds.
    Would you buy one? Request for comments.

    Youtube link 1. Link 2.


    Regards,

    Danny
    ---------------------------
    Wer anderen etwas vorgedacht, ....... When you propose a solution for someone's problem,
    wird jahrelang nur ausgelacht. ....... you will be ridiculed for years.
    Begreift man die Entdeckung endlich, ....... When the discovery is finally understood,
    so nennt sie jeder selbstverstÙ†ndlich. ....... everyone will say it is obvious.
    -- Wilhelm Busch --

  • #2
    I'll buy one when evan tells me his wife has gone outta business selling chains and chain files to the professional loggers. :P
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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    • #3
      Does it require special chains? Otherwise you are just grinding the top down making the top thinner, which I would think isn't good for chain life.

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      • #4
        Looks pretty good, but for limited applications. I'm surprised the starter kits are pretty cheap. When I say limited applications, only to 18" bar length, no skip tooth.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Abner
          Does it require special chains? Otherwise you are just grinding the top down making the top thinner, which I would think isn't good for chain life.


          Yup. I could see this making chains unsafe as well when the cutters get thin and start flying off.
          Andy

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          • #6
            Yes, the video in link 1 shows that you need a special chain as well as a special bar.

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            • #7
              Well, I spent a good part of Sunday sharpening cutting teeth with a hand held grinder and then a die grinder to get the depth gauges down to spec; so this looks interesting to me. I wish the demo in link 2 showed a close up of the chips to see how large they were.

              For a while I had my chains "professionally" sharpened until I got two chains back with the teeth turned blue and the leading edge of the cutter melted back because the idiot was in a hurry.

              Some of you guys need to watch the first video again, it's a special chain with a completely different cutter geometry.

              Steve

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              • #8
                I have one of these, given to me by a guy on whose property they filmed a commercial. They gave it to him as a freebie.

                I've looked at it, but not used it. It does take a special chain--the teeth are sharpened on the top surface rather than from the gullet side.

                I saw them yesterday at Home Depot on the Clearance shelf.
                For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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                • #9
                  This is not really new. I recall some 25 -25 years ago there were saws that incorporated a sharpening feature, using special chains that were ground on top like that. There was a name for those type cutters/chains - seems like they were called "barracuda", or something like that.

                  With those saws, the sharpener was in the powerhead.

                  I remember one of my neighbors at the time had one.
                  Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                  • #10
                    I found the diamond dressing tooth rather funny.

                    How about diamond coated chainsaw blades Sure would keep it from getting dulled on rocks/metal.
                    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                    • #11
                      This SHOULD be described as "a new way to sell chains, bars and sharpeners."
                      Does it cut any BETTER? Any FASTER? Any SAFER? No, it just locks you into a specialty bar, chain and sharpening attachment. You can bet that the chains will ALWAYS be premium priced since the volume will be so low.
                      Anyone who has used a chainsaw more than a little bit will agree that it pays to keep it out of the dirt. Sure, everyone has an OOOPS, but if you have more than a few, you are either careless or sloppy. I learned to sharpen my own chains. I can do it freehand, but being a southpaw, they tend to get a bit of a skew to the tooth angles on one side. Every few sharpenings, I get out the filing jig to straighten things out. I have used a file, a stone or a diamond in a Dremel Tool, but I think that a file does the best job and that the Swiss files are better than Nicholson, (I know, application for US citizenship will be summarily denied! )
                      Short story:- I was into Woss Camp, the north central logging camp on Vancouver Island, owned by Canadian Forrest Products. In the mid 70s this camp shipped 1,000,000 sbf of logs every working day. They had forty-some fallers and their saws were supplied and maintained under contract by a resident saw mechanic. I talked with him and he explained that each faller took a saw and one extra chain into the bush each day. In the evening they brought the saws to him for service, if needed. He would either repair or supply a replacement, but he only had about a dozen spares. He did have LOTS of chain and spare bars.
                      The point is, these guys made their living, (and it was a Damned good one!) and only used , at most, two chains in a cutting day. the secret was that they kept them out of the dirt!
                      These fallers were on wages, but a few years earlier they had been on piece-work. At that time there were only 25-30 fallers in the camp, but a top faller, in a good stand could drop 100,000 sbf of logs in a day. Which, by the way, was 6 1/2 hours including travel to and from the work site. When the piece-work incentive went, they had to hire more fallers.
                      The saws were, IIRC, Husquavarnas, but that was just who won the contract.
                      Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                      • #12
                        I was amused at the repeated "three to five seconds to sharpen a chain." Yeah, not counting the time it took to stop the saw, install the sharpener, [sharpen for 3 - 5 seconds], stop the saw, remove the sharpener, toss the sharpener, and re-start the saw. It's still fast, I'll grant that, but their few second theme was really stretching it.
                        .
                        "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Black_Moons
                          I found the diamond dressing tooth rather funny.

                          How about diamond coated chainsaw blades Sure would keep it from getting dulled on rocks/metal.
                          Don't think you can get a diamond coated one but they do make chain with carbide teeth. I priced one about 5 years ago and it was $130 (18" bar) and needed a diamond coated wheel to resharpen.

                          Steve

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SteveF
                            Well, I spent a good part of Sunday sharpening cutting teeth with a hand held grinder and then a die grinder to get the depth gauges down to spec; so this looks interesting to me. I wish the demo in link 2 showed a close up of the chips to see how large they were.
                            I would suggest you learn to sharpen a chain properly with a file, or spend the $8 and buy another chain. Ive sharpened quite a few, having learned as a teenager in the sawmill, and rescued quite a few that were basically destroyed for customers. It never took more than 40 minutes with a file.

                            I love power sharpeners. Growing up around professional woodsmen I noticed that the guys with sharpeners were always homeowners, and usually had a bar that was far from flat.
                            "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SteveF
                              Don't think you can get a diamond coated one but they do make chain with carbide teeth. I priced one about 5 years ago and it was $130 (18" bar) and needed a diamond coated wheel to resharpen.

                              Steve
                              I first used a diamond coated chainsaw about 15 years ago to cut some stone columns. Our company has a couple of them right now, don't get used much as they have a short HAV exposure limit and the chains are expensive too.
                              Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                              Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                              Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                              Monarch 10EE 1942

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