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The ellipsograph used in "The Woodwright's Shop"

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  • gwilson
    replied
    That sounds useful.

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Originally posted by gwilson
    There is no practical application for concave knurling I can think of, except
    for use on jewelry, perhaps.
    My interest was for decorative work but I believe that concave knurling would
    also serve a useful purpose on rolls intended for feeding/restraining rope-like
    material.

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    On the subject of tools for making ellipses, I am reminded of a thread from
    earlier this year 'Machining Ellipses' by sbmathias.

    I am not comparing craftsmanship or design, only drawing attention to
    sbmathias' description of a simple technique for creating ellipses with a
    router (and possibly a mill) for those here with an interest.

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • gwilson
    replied
    Yes,Eddie,a concave knurl makes a convex knurl on the work you are doing. Or,you can use the concave knurl as a "mother knurl" to make a convex knurl,should you want to produce a piece of work with concave knurling on it as a decoration.There is no practical application for concave knurling I can think of,except for use on jewelry,perhaps.

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    gwilson, thank you for the image showing your technique for concave knurling
    and thanks to Chester for providing a link to the PM thread with your original
    discussion of the subject.

    To others here who, like me, may wonder how gwilson's convex knurls shown
    on the ellipsograph are made, the answer can also be found in the PM thread
    (first make a concave knurl, then use this to cut a convex one.)

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • gwilson
    replied
    Old Dog,I suppose it is a home grown form of hobbing. Since I am telling you about it,it probably is hob-knobbing.

    Chester,your link doesn't come up,but I can tell from the title that it is a reference to the old B.S.grinder,or "smoke grinder",etc. that used to be wooden toys. Exactly the same principle. Just make sure the sliders fit well in their T slots so you don't draw shaky looking ellipses.

    Leave a comment:


  • fciron
    replied
    Originally posted by Chester
    That's the one! I've got my knurls and a project I used them on at the end. Hmmm,

    I've been ogling ellipsographs in a book on drawing instruments. I might have to give it a go at some point.

    Leave a comment:


  • j.bain87
    replied
    Here's another one, goes by a different name tho'.


    http://growabrain.typepad.com/growab...**-grinde.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Your Old Dog
    replied
    Really great workmanship. Is the tap under power or turned by hand when you made the knurl? What ever you did it worked great. Was this the process known as hobbing?

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  • Scottike
    replied
    Beautiful workmanship, G.W.! I love how you made the knerls with the tap. A tap and overcome!

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  • gwilson
    replied
    Yes,I believe so. Thought it had more pictures,but those are enough. Plus the lengthy explanations. I've had a few guys make their own knurls from reading that post.

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  • Chester
    replied
    Is this the one?

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...ctures-212670/

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  • gwilson
    replied
    I did a pretty thorough posting of making knurls on the Practical Machinist forum several months ago. You could go there and do a search. Lots of pictures of the process.

    If anyone wants to paste it here,that's fine. I don't know how to do that.

    Leave a comment:


  • sasquatch
    replied
    Beautiful piece of work!!

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  • Black_Moons
    replied
    Originally posted by gwilson
    They have flat head screws silver soldered underneath the brass pieces. These screws go into drilled holes filled with glue. Doing it this way prevents the inevitable reappearance of the heads of screws put in through the top and filed flush when the wood slightly responds to humidity changes.
    Silver soldering screwheads and then glueing in the threads? Nifty doublehack! Never would of thought of that.

    Leave a comment:

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