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  • sheet metal bug -- diy tools?

    don't know how it started but a few months ago i got a bit of a sheet metal
    bug.. simple stuff, boxes, bent forms, etc .. things I used to "build up" with
    the welder I've been finding quite enjoyable to form instead..

    anyway i'm wondering what my odds are of building a small notcher.. to
    take maybe 4" x 4" pieces out to make things like boxes / pans / etc..
    maybe 14 gauge at the heaviest.. aluminum most often but with the
    occasional stainless thrown in (but lighter gauge).

    someone do this as their day job? any tips / hints? I assume i have to be able
    to account for material thickness.. but how much of a gap do I need?

    the blades will need heat treat.. maybe i can find something
    that fits the bill and is already the right shape and heat treated.
    hell its just a square right?

    have done some shopping around but nothing round these parts in the
    used market.

    I have a 12T hydraulic press I can put this under.

    if I could figure out how to punch holes, too, that'd be spectacular.

    home-built ironworker anyone?

  • #2



    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

    Comment


    • #3



      Glen
      Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
      I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
      All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

      Comment


      • #4


        Only one I have ever seen, no name on it but has a number of accessories for sheet metal and bending.

        The other tools are available at most big box stores/HF




        Glen
        Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
        I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
        All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

        Comment


        • #5
          PT Sideshow;
          Is your 'sheet metal brake for bench vise' bolted to the vise?

          A slightly different version (1 hole @ 5/8", 2 holes @ 1/2");



          https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink


          Last edited by Disaster area; 08-19-2011, 04:18 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes as you can see in the first photo of the vise both sides have 3 holes in the top wings so you can mount the rollers on top of the benders jaws.
            Glen
            Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
            I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
            All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

            Comment


            • #7
              LOL,love the "wack a doodle" Had my own variation of that here in my shop.A big vise and a hammer can do wonders.I have bent up 4 foot light sheet with wood and C clamps and the rubber mallet too.

              Comment


              • #8
                Sheet metal fun..

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LO5CZdbgtwU
                (1)... Tipping wheel, a pizza cutter wheel on spindle, lowered down over a urethane caster allowing you to roll a "creased bend" into the sheet, it can then be bent the remainder over with a hammer and dolly, or sheet pliers, or..
                A stubborn person can use that tipping wheel and make near anything anyone can with a brake. except no limit on the distance..

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEgnRNcn7BQ
                (2)... TUCKPUCK.. a depression cut into a piece of UHMW, sold by a buddy.. you hammer the metal down sharply in the middle creating "wrinkles" which are then hammered into themselves compressing the sheet into a thicker piece effectively shrinking the sheet making it "roll over" and curve. A "hard wood stump" can do somewhat the same thing, except THIS you can put into a toolbox and not trip over it. See stump shrinking.. People can use stumps to "make anything" by varying the stretch and shrink over a piece of metal.. Old car fenders used to be made by hammer and stump, no more tools. (forgotten art form) Leather sandbag, used for stretching with mallets and hammers.

                (3)... Plasma cutter, able to make patterns or "notch" by mdf pattern.. or cardboard pattern for one use.

                (4) assorted hammers, teardrop mallets... careful.. you can go broke buying "fancy ones"..

                (5 a luxury) English wheel, mostly only for stretching metal.. smoothing is mostly what I use it for.. Add a go cart slick and rounded lower roller and you can "roll form" any transmission tunnel or rounded profile, this does not stretch or shrink the metal, just form it into a curve..

                (6 real luxury) a power hammer, pullmax, yoder, shop dog hammer. Allows you to make scrap much faster than "learning the real principles by hand slowly".

                Youtube is your friend.. There is people shaping metal that I wonder how they find their way home at night.. So egotistical? I wonder how they stuff that head in front of a mirror.

                PUNCHING ON PRESS.. mount your electricians Greenlee knockout cutters on the press work surfaces.. a fine thread mount, use index cross hairs on outside sleeve to center your holes.. BUY slug splitters so the half moons fall out instead of the slug having to be pried out.

                You can buy hole punch tools from Cleveland tool and die company, make holders in your HSM shop.. ain't it fun to be able to do that??
                Excuse me, I farted.

                Comment


                • #9
                  One more??

                  OCD??

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRGjKfOHfM8
                  A kid.. using wire forms to press designs into sheetmetal.. make them toolboxes unique.
                  Excuse me, I farted.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for the video's, as I have thought about a tipping type wheel but the cost of a stand alone or accessories for another type sheet metal machine for occasional use not to mention space. That one shows that a simple cheap shop built one will work a treat!
                    What I found interesting, was the possibility of up scaling the idea. By using heavier gas welding rod or round stock welded, soldered or brazed to a steel backing plate. And then making either larger 18"x18" would probably be the largest size one could do by a hand type press. Plus the cheapest neoprene rubber backing sheets for the embossing plate are the interlocking floor pads. 24"x24"
                    The original version/style could also be used with a child doing the design free hand and adults doing the pressing. It would be good for a repeat pattern small scale production of wall panels or the old style tin ceiling panels.
                    Glen
                    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Metal oragami

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7vXN...eature=related
                      Making decorative embossed boxes from aluminum cans. Trash to treasure.

                      PT... If I had it to do over? I could consolidate the C-press and the english wheel, tipping wheel, bead roller, press, bender, stock bender, roll bender, Model3 bender..
                      (perhaps it needs to say Acme, as in Wile E Coyote on the side?)
                      Hows that for a universal tool? I have been making tooling for it as I go, and need.


                      1) Ain't nothing holding you back, but you..
                      2) CAN'T is a 4 letter word.

                      Mock up for the go cart slick.. NOTE, that brown cylinder there on the left can hold the cleveland punch and dies for the scotchman ironworker there in the back right.
                      Excuse me, I farted.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PTSideshow


                        Only one I have ever seen, no name on it but has a number of accessories for sheet metal and bending.
                        I have one of those and I'm still trying to find info or a user manual for it. I haven't even mounted mine yet.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          here's a little bending brake i cobbled together. its maybe 30" across,
                          two pieces of angle and other "junk" to get the angle to either stay
                          still or move.

                          i have to say its light enough that i can just throw it on the bench
                          and throw it off as I need it.. instead of wheeling out the bigger one
                          for the small bends.





                          I was going to put a clamping head on the top till I started experimenting
                          with just bolting some steel as required. What I like about this is that
                          you can make folds onto themselves (like a box section) with nothing getting
                          in the way. downside is you need scraps in all the right sizes.



                          ps my new favorite color for tools is white.
                          but it turns "grime" fast. i made the mistake of painting this with a brush.
                          its small enough that masking and cleaning up the gun etc would've been
                          a pain.. but its a week later and this thing still aint dry! I'm throwing all
                          my brushes out.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by knucklehead
                            don't know how it started but a few months ago i got a bit of a sheet metal bug.. simple stuff, boxes, bent forms, etc .. things I used to "build up" with the welder I've been finding quite enjoyable to form instead.. anyway i'm wondering what my odds are of building a small notcher.. to take maybe 4" x 4" pieces out to make things like boxes / pans / etc..maybe 14 gauge at the heaviest.. aluminum most often but with the
                            occasional stainless thrown in (but lighter gauge).someone do this as their day job? any tips / hints? I assume i have to be able to account for material thickness.. but how much of a gap do I need? the blades will need heat treat.. maybe i can find something that fits the bill and is already the right shape and heat treated. hell its just a square right? have done some shopping around but nothing round these parts in the used market. I have a 12T hydraulic press I can put this under. if I could figure out how to punch holes, too, that'd be spectacular. home-built ironworker anyone?
                            Hello Knucklehead,
                            Would you be interedted in making these three parts out of 16 gauge steel with your sheet metal tools? The holes, the 30 and 60 degree angled cuts can be ignored. The radius on the side tabs will change their positions so I will take care of them myself.
                            Thanks for looking.
                            Greg

                            Top of tubeclamps...


                            Angled view...


                            Side tab details....holes and angled cuts can be ignored. The radius changes their positions.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              ?? Cnc sliders for pipe??? put the bearings in the openings??

                              I'd do a die for the press... wham.. one.. wham two.... wham... wham, wham..
                              The curve actually adds a whole lotta strength.. if that is what that is.. 16ga would be fine.. for several hundred pounds.
                              Excuse me, I farted.

                              Comment

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