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any thoughts on this QCTP??

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  • Bill Pace
    replied
    The Phase II tool post base is NOT hardened, I have had 3 of those and milling them was a straight forward procedure.

    I should get my Jeff Beck TP tomorrow, and will see about it, but as pixman says, that would seem counterproductive to require the purchaser to have to machine a hardened piece.

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  • PixMan
    replied
    That really shouldn't be very hard. It's a well-known fact that they're made oversized so that the buyer can fit it to his or her machine. I don't think they'd make that task closer to impossible for the average home shop machinist who would be buying it.

    If it is hardened through or case-hardened, it's still machinable. YOu just need quality carbide tooling and know how to use it effectively.

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  • 383 240z
    replied
    The part that goes into the t-slot is what I will be whittling on, I might be working on it tonight, I never thought to drag a file across it to see if it was hardened. Keith

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  • MarkA
    replied
    Originally posted by PixMan
    I don't understand. Are you saying you have to mill the base of the tool post body itself, or are you referring to the common task of having to modify the T-nut to fit the slot in your machine's compound slide?
    I presume he means the piece of steel supplied to make the tee nut. That's what I was referring to.

    I could be wrong, of course.

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  • PixMan
    replied
    I don't understand. Are you saying you have to mill the base of the tool post body itself, or are you referring to the common task of having to modify the T-nut to fit the slot in your machine's compound slide?

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  • MarkA
    replied
    Originally posted by 383 240z
    I'll be cutting it down on my Cincinnati Toolmaster mill. Anything special I will need to watch out for? I figure keep the post centered, and leave as much contact area as I can. Keith
    I've milled two QCTP bases from CDCOtools. They were both harder than the hinges on the gates of hades.

    Ruined a HSS endmill on the first, and found a carbide end mill was the best for me. Didn't cut like butter, but wasn't too bad.

    Let us know how you get on.

    Regards
    Mark

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  • 383 240z
    replied
    I'll be cutting it down on my Cincinnati Toolmaster mill. Anything special I will need to watch out for? I figure keep the post centered, and leave as much contact area as I can. Keith

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  • Chris S.
    replied
    Do you have a mill or are you going to do it on the lathe?

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  • 383 240z
    replied
    Well it showed up today over all I think it will serve it's purpose still hard to believe that somebody is willing to do all that work, sell it to an importer, ship it across the globe, get it to a reseller and to and end user, turn a profit along the way and it still only cost me $100. Anyway, I still need to mill the base to fit my compound. I prolly won't get a chance to do that until this weekend. Keith

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  • hareng
    replied
    Sounds a bargain Bill, thats a CXA otherwise known as the 300 series, just what i am after.

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  • Bill Pace
    replied
    So I just ordered a QCTP from Jeff Beck @ tools4cheap and added 4 extra tool holders. His cost lies between CDCO and Phase I with the set being very little difference from CDCO, but the holders being a bit more.

    Re the size of his holders - Looking over his web site, he shows a ruler next to his conventional tool holder and it shows to be 3 1/2" and checking my CDCO and Phase II, I show 2 3/4" so that clinched my choice of which set to get. (of course, all the very good recommendations for Jeff Beck certainly puts the icing on the cake)

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  • Black_Moons
    replied
    Originally posted by DATo
    Howdy Forrest !!! You are certainly correct when you say that a BXA tool post can be made by a HSM but when you factor in material costs and time I doubt that one can beat the purchase of an entire set of tool holders PLUS the tool post for the prices found in some of these responses. A couple of posts lead to offers for an entire set for $100 or less. I know you generally get what you pay for but for normal shop use by a hobbyist I would think that these imported sets would be adequate. Just an observation ... I don't mean to nitpick.
    Yea I got a phase II wedge toolpost for.. like $150 on enco sale or something? Really damn nice quality.

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  • DATo
    replied
    Originally posted by Forrest Addy
    Many, many people have made their BXA dovetail toolholders from alloy steel or 1040 and heat treated them. Some even made their holders from mild steel and a few from aluminum(!!!).

    Making a dozen new tool holders isn't hard, just tedious. The only dimension you need to sweat is the pin measurement over the dovetails.

    You can ge a length of rectangular alloy steel from an on-line supplier for abour double the going cost or you can find a local supplier. If there's a local shop specializing in press brake dies they may have an alloy steel drop that's just about right. A 50 lb length of the right stuff should cost you about $80 plus a saw cut.

    If you don't have a mill to make tools holders on - well - it's either depend on the kindness of a local guy who has one or buy the tool holders you need where you can.
    Howdy Forrest !!! You are certainly correct when you say that a BXA tool post can be made by a HSM but when you factor in material costs and time I doubt that one can beat the purchase of an entire set of tool holders PLUS the tool post for the prices found in some of these responses. A couple of posts lead to offers for an entire set for $100 or less. I know you generally get what you pay for but for normal shop use by a hobbyist I would think that these imported sets would be adequate. Just an observation ... I don't mean to nitpick.

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  • uncle pete
    replied
    Yeah it is Jeff Beck at tools for cheap and he's a great guy to do business with.

    Pete

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  • PixMan
    replied
    Once upon a time, I had found a comparison photo of the blocks that CDCO and Tools4Cheap.net sell, side-by-side. It was posted on that Australian woodworker forum with a machinist sub-forum. I posted a link to the photo once on another site, now I can't find it.

    Suffice to say that Jeff's are the longer ones, His also have a higher-quality knurled nut, better dog-point set screws and overall better fit & finish. But I think his cost $1 or $2 more than CDCO.

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