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  • Super Fast Indicating

    This is really fast!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=tn7A9PqNftY

  • #2
    That's what I use! Got the idea right off this very site a couple of years ago.
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
    Monarch 10EE 1942

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    • #3
      Hmm- seems to me the ball bearing 'trick' was for part alignment. For indicating, he actually used an indicator

      Nothing wrong with the 'trick' though- I use the basic method all the time, just haven't done it with a bearing before.

      But- he misses the boat. Once he tightens the chuck, he's done- but there's still runout, caused by tightening the jaws. He should have brought the torque up a bit after the first alignment with the bearing, then used the bearing again. That's the real beauty of the method- the bearing has both low friction against the workpiece, and by virtue of being solidly mounted it is capable of aligning the part even when the jaws are tighter. A final tightening won't throw the alignment off by as much if you do it in two stages.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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      • #4
        Not indicating. Truing.

        I think Frank Ford has building one of these on his site.

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        • #5
          Oh great, one more shop made tool I just gotta have.

          Thanks!
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          Make it fit.
          You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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          • #6
            I liked the cute hack of just welding on two rods insted of making dovetails, though I wonder if it would'nt end up wearing a small dent in the dovetail..
            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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            • #7
              I just hate to see people leave their key in the chuck like that.
              Even if it is 'just for a minute'.

              A sense of anxiety just comes out of my screen when i see that.

              Neat trick, though.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Black_Moons
                I liked the cute hack of just welding on two rods insted of making dovetails, though I wonder if it would'nt end up wearing a small dent in the dovetail..
                Someone on here did it a while ago to hold a large insert holder to his toolpost.

                You could almost as easily machine a bevel on one side of some flat bar, cut it to length and weld or bolt the bevels to whatever you want to mount
                Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                Monarch 10EE 1942

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                • #9
                  Nice wrinkle. I've seen versions of that many times over the years. Not always bearings, sticks of wood, plastic, ends of tool shanks and so on.

                  This might be a good time to mention that back in the day apprentices were allowed two whole minutes on a four jaw chuck to dial both ends in to 0.001" - from scratch inserting copper or gasket material padding under the jaws.

                  Two minutes is a fair amount of time when you come to think about it. When I was a fourth year apprentice old Gruber a senior lathe hand held the watch on me. I finished with a few seconds to spare but plenty before me were quicker and Gruber was quick to let me know my slack and lazy ways would catch up to me. It's a matter of practice. Set yourself a challenge then try to beat it.

                  The video showed you one way to cheat on the overhung end.

                  By the way, the guy appears to be an old lathe hand. Notice how short the grip was in his chuck. You don't have to swallow the work to get a good grip on it.
                  Last edited by Forrest Addy; 08-20-2011, 05:53 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I've got one similar,but mine has two bearings on the radial truing end.The runout he got on the radial truing was due to the internal tolerance of the bearing over running the high center of the part.Two bearings set apart by they're center distance averages the runout down to the round limit of the material.

                    I also like the rod idea for a q&d toolholder.
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by knucklehead
                      I just hate to see people leave their key in the chuck like that.
                      Even if it is 'just for a minute'.

                      A sense of anxiety just comes out of my screen when i see that.

                      Neat trick, though.
                      I have to agree there. I once saw a key get from a 10" get thrown 20m across a workshop after someone forgot about it, thankfully nobody was in the way.

                      However, looking at everything else in that video, one can conclude that he is somewhat.... how shall I put this... Rough.

                      Andy
                      Me on a good day is like a black hole, we know they exist but nobody's ever seen one

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                      • #12
                        Speaking of launching chuck keys, one cool advantage of a VFD's controlled accel is it can be set to just give the key a little toss, not throw it hard enough to stick it in your head.

                        We use to have a line of big Gisholt turret lathes each with 40 HP. No clutch. The go was an across the line motor start. It would accel to 1200 RPM in - I'd swear - 1/10 second. Hit the jog: Bwee!. And the "w" sound was the accel time. They had 20" chucks and if running in reverse a negligent operator could jog the spindle and throw the key about 100 feet into the next bay.
                        Last edited by Forrest Addy; 08-20-2011, 11:20 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by darryl
                          Hmm- seems to me the ball bearing 'trick' was for part alignment. For indicating, he actually used an indicator
                          I guess I should have titled the thread "Super Fast Alignment".

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by macona
                            Not indicating. Truing.

                            I think Frank Ford has building one of these on his site.
                            Darn!. "Super Fast Truing" then.

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                            • #15
                              Love it!

                              Glad I remembered to come on here from home today, when I can actually click on the youtube links, rather than from work.
                              ----
                              Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

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