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  • Going to take a look at a bridgy

    Very close to me (basicly same town) bridgy popped up on the list. Not much for a description but it is a J head which from what I read is a bit better then the older M head because of the R8 taper and power downfeed. Looks fairly clean in the pic and looks to have power X feed as well. Is this bridgy to early to have chromed ways? I've asked before but I would like a refresher before going to take a look, what are the important points to be inspecting with these machines? Its been 14-15 years since I've worked with a mill so I have forgot pretty much everything I knew. I would assume to check out the ways for wear but I know some machines it is hard to tell if there is wear on the ways because of their design. Not sure if it is under power yet to check for bearing noise and if everything works. From the machines I've seen over the last couple years of watching this one is a bit higher priced but the location is perfect (save me fuel and time getting it) and I don't know what "some tooling included" all entails.

    What do you guys think? Some pointers on what to check out and how to check with or without power? What do you think of this bridgy John?

    http://wausau.craigslist.org/tls/2505765517.html
    Andy

  • #2
    Nooooooooooooooo.

    Run don't walk, take up drinking or boat ownership, both are far more rewarding.
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #3
      Hard to say from the image, but looks to be all there. One place you may be able to beat the guy down a little on the price is if there appears to be backlash in the lead screws. This can usually be taken up later by a simple adjustment on the leadscrew nut. Makes a good bargaining point though. Easy proximity to the machine is a big plus, moving this kind of stuff any distance takes a lot of the fun out of it, unless you happen to have friends with wierd senses of what constitutes an enjoyable day. I'm rich in the latter respect, and am one of those friends to many. Good luck.

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      • #4
        This looks interesting .... a horizontal Bridgeport.

        http://stlouis.craigslist.org/tls/2514779803.html

        Not a bad price considering the DRO and power feed (by the way, I can vouch for that BP power feed ... it's a good'un).

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        • #5
          Don't pay attention to John, he's just jealous... I mean prejudiced.

          Backlash is important and also look at the ways and see how much, if any scraping can still be seen. Smooth ways with "lines" worn in are a sign of a lot of use. If you can still see a fair amount of scraping, it might have had little use.

          It looks like a shorter table from the picture. Is that a power table feed on the left side?? If not, what the heck is it?

          Probably the vise comes with it which is a big plus and "some tooling" might be a good thing too.
          VitŮŽria, Brazil

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          • #6
            When you go look at the machine, position the slides about in the middle of their travel. Take note of how much backlash the screws have. Then, with the locks loose, grab the left or right-hand handle with your hand cupped over the end of the screw. (Meaning not holding onto the handle itself.)

            Tug and push with some force. You'll probably feel some degree of looseness, I can almost guarantee it. Now you just have to decide if there's any adjustment range left in the gibs, or is it too worn to consider.

            If it's under power, engage the feed worm and test to see if the down feed works. Set the quill stop in such a place as you can see if the quill feed kicks out OK when it reaches the stop. If the machine is not under power, you're taking some chances because you can't hear how the spindle bearings sound or how well the brake works.

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            • #7
              Dato, the big problem with those horizontal Bridgeports is that most people don't have walls strong enough to mount them.

              Michael

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              • #8
                I am going to look at it monday.

                PixMan, when you mention tugging and pushing are you talking about on the table itself, or the Y leadscrew in and out? Am I looking at the knee ways or the table ways? Sorry, I was just taught how to basic run the machines I never actually learned much about the maintenance and the wear the mills gets and how to check for it.


                David, now that you mention it the table does look shorter then normal. I did notice the what looks to be X power feed being on the wrong side but I just assumed it was some other make power feed that just designed to go on that side. Now I'm thinking the whole table is weird, did bridgeport offer other size tables for these? Looks like it is a 11x36"ish table with a European power feed.
                Andy

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by form_change
                  Dato, the big problem with those horizontal Bridgeports is that most people don't have walls strong enough to mount them.

                  Michael

                  Keeps the chips off the mill.
                  Andy

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by vpt
                    David, now that you mention it the table does look shorter then normal. I did notice the what looks to be X power feed being on the wrong side but I just assumed it was some other make power feed that just designed to go on that side. Now I'm thinking the whole table is weird, did bridgeport offer other size tables for these? Looks like it is a 11x36"ish table with a European power feed.
                    It does appear to be a short table, probably 36". I seem to recall that the Zeromax powerfeed mounted on the left end of the table.
                    Jim H.

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                    • #11
                      You gotta re-learn the axes on those horizontal mills- the way the manual describes x and z doesn't make sense- don't ask me y.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by vpt
                        I am going to look at it monday.

                        PixMan, when you mention tugging and pushing are you talking about on the table itself, or the Y leadscrew in and out? Am I looking at the knee ways or the table ways? Sorry, I was just taught how to basic run the machines I never actually learned much about the maintenance and the wear the mills gets and how to check for it.
                        I mean to pull on the X axis (left or right) end of the table itself. Doing that, if there's any play in the gibs for the table or the Y axis, you'll find it. There's a little too much weight on the Z axis (knee) to be able to get a feel for wear on that, so that'll have to be a visual reading.

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                        • #13
                          If you buy it I'd highly recommend taking it apart to move it. Their really simple machines and you'd end up with about 10-12 lighter lumps to move instead of one really heavy one. You can then clean, inspect each part as you put it back togeather. Also that would be a good time to verify that the one shot oiler is delivering the correct ammount of oil to all the oiling points. That's also the easist time to do the backlash ajustments too. Remove the motor first,You Use the machines table to support the weight of the head with the bottom of the spindle touching a piece of plywood on the table while removing the 4 mounting bolts.. The whole head then comes off in one piece. After doing mine I'd never move one in one piece. The base, table, Z axis casting and head are the 4 heaviest parts. Be careful to protect the leadscrews if you do this, They are delicate as far as any dings, Those will screw up the accuracy.

                          Pete

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                          • #14
                            The Bridgy sounds good, If you are not successful, What about an Elliott 00? !!!

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                            • #15
                              One good point I have heard about the shorter tables is the ways wear less than the longer ones, because of less over hang/weight.
                              Of course it will depend on how much work the machine has had over the years.

                              Dave

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