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  • Help Identify this fly cutter...

    Got this in a box of parts with my new mill, but can't really see in my head how this would be used. Any thoughts? I didn't measure it, but the ID looks to be a straight bore.





    Rakort

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  • #2
    A possible solution to

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=49546

    Mandrel or shaft down the middle (the counter bore/sink on the backside of the "disc" would allow for fastening in a clamping method) whole works spun/rotated for the inside of a bore.
    It looks like the point where each one of those fastening bolts for the "fingers" is a bit of a slot allowing for some slight adjustment.

    Above is definitely a guess, going strictly by the cutting edge of the inserts.
    To me those fingers could be adjusted so as to be exactly the same diameters and the whole thing could be moved up and down (or side to side if in a horizontal position) like one does with a hone OR those fingers could be adjusted to slightly different diameters to allow for an enlarging of an existing bore.
    Edit: suspect if you added another four fingers, either the cutting could go more quickly or the accuracy of the bore would improve (or there maybe less chatter since more surface area should mean a bit more stability)
    Edit # 2: for me a good enough idea to copy

    Edit # 3: sorry, I suppose one could also use it "on edge" and mill a rabbet (sp?) or, not knowing clearances, a fairly wide and shallow slot ?
    Last edited by RussZHC; 08-25-2011, 02:33 AM.

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    • #3
      Yes the individual pieces holding the inserts are slotted SLIGHTLY and have a small set screw in the end (not visible in picture) to help control the adjustment / position. It is a crude adjustment and best.

      Originally posted by RussZHC
      It looks like the point where each one of those fastening bolts for the "fingers" is a bit of a slot allowing for some slight adjustment.

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      • #4
        My guess would be, a homemade boring head and/or counterbore.
        There doesn't seem to be much clearance behind those inserts, so it may have been used to just skim a bore?
        Or, as RussZHC said, it might have been used to side-mill a shallow groove?
        Strange critters, them home-made gizmos.

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        • #5
          I would not think it would be used for boring - it would be chatter city and also near impossible to set up all the cutters accurately.

          Its very well built so I also would not label it a "home brew" only.

          Whatever it was used for last looks like it was not critical to have the cutters adjusted spot on due to the fact that some are at opposite ends of their slots


          still could be used for flycutting certain sized bar stock "as is" but so limited it speaks of being either very specialized or else severely lacking foresight.


          If I had that thing laying around my shop I would mill cutter slots opposite side, build a center mount and flip it over and use it as a very stable flycutter...


          Im puzzled about one thing --- what are those little vertical bolt holes or allen heads doing in the cutter holder?
          Are they some kind of height adjustment?

          Now that im looking at it I don't believe its the most rigid setup for the cutters.
          Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 08-25-2011, 09:09 AM.

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          • #6
            Cutter

            My guess would be a flycutter for a big horzontal mill like a Cincinnati or Milwaukee. It would be a quick way to square up large pieces. Do the 1st side, put that side on the table, do the next side, roll it again, etc.
            Kansas City area

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            • #7
              Maybe it fits right over the spindle of the mill and then the draw bar snugs up a piece you don't have against it to secure it.
              VitŮŽria, Brazil

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              • #8
                it's obvious - it's for finishing the underside edge of something spaced off the table

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                • #9
                  rakort: apologies if this post partially hijacks this thread...does anyone think it is horribly wrong if one were to use a lathe backplate with cutters in a similar position as a fly cutter?
                  Just asking as on second look the general shape sure reminds me of that...

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                  • #10
                    LOL

                    Rakort

                    Originally posted by dockterj
                    it's obvious - it's for finishing the underside edge of something spaced off the table

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                    • #11
                      Ya the back plate thing crossed my mind

                      Originally posted by RussZHC
                      rakort: apologies if this post partially hijacks this thread...does anyone think it is horribly wrong if one were to use a lathe backplate with cutters in a similar position as a fly cutter?
                      Just asking as on second look the general shape sure reminds me of that...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by A.K. Boomer
                        Its very well built so I also would not label it a "home brew" only.
                        It looks like someone modified a chuck backplate blank.

                        There's no drive key, so the through-hole has to fit on an arbor sleeve, the quill or a horizontal overarm.

                        How big is the hole?
                        Last edited by lazlo; 08-25-2011, 09:11 PM.
                        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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