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45/90 built entirly on a lathe

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  • 45/90 built entirly on a lathe

    My scratch-built 45/90 HighWall project is about ready for the bluing tanks (need advice desperately on that one!) and I thought I would put up a couple of pics. It has taken well over a year but that includes a recuperation period from a broken knee, kinda hard to get around in the shop on crutches! Anyway it is about completed and lacking a mill it was done entirely on my lathe using a home built (more like cobbled) milling attachment and a couple of more home made attachments that sort of defy description but they worked. I built every piece in the gun including all the internals and springs except for the screws and the brass buttplate that I stole from my muzzle loader, well that and the barrel which was converted to an octagon from a 1.270" round blank from Green Mountain. This was my first attempt at anything anywhere near this kind of complexity and I sort of learned as I went but you guys were a heck of a lot of help and I really do appreciate that. I did some major redesigning of the hammer/sear mechanism and trigger assembly to eliminate the, to me anyway, unsightly screws and pins in the receiver sides and this modification not only gives a much cleaner exterior appearance but allows for very simple trigger adjustment.









    Last edited by radkins; 06-26-2014, 04:11 PM.

  • #2
    Beautiful! I don't know anything about gun-making, does the barrel blank come bored, chambered and rifled?

    Gordon

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    • #3
      The barrel is just a 34" long 1.270" diameter blank that is bored and rifled but that's all, it's way oversized as-is and is not chambered. I turned the barrel down and milled the flats on it to produce a tapered octagon that's 1.190 at the breech and 1.050 at the muzzle.

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      • #4
        Wholly impressive.

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        • #5
          Very very nice. An admirable undertaking under any circumstances, but even more so considering using only a lathe.

          I would appreciate details of the internals, particularly how you either eliminated the lower tang or how you attach it without the screws.
          Jim H.

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          • #6
            The lower tang is still there but instead of drilling through the sides of the receiver I built the tang with small flanges on either side and milled recesses in the back of the receiver to match. This is a "Thick-Side" version and as such has enough metal (however I think even the "Thin-Side" version would have the same at that point) to accept these flanges and small screws which are then hidden by the stock along with the rest of the internal trigger assembly. As for the sear I made a carrier with rails similar to the front of the lower tang and then milled slots inside the receiver to fit these rails, again similar to the slots for the lower tang. The carrier and sear assembly slides into the receiver along with the lower tang/trigger assembly and is then held in place by a set screw, because of the design the set screw can be loosened and the assembly moved to adjust the trigger but, by design, the assembly can not move enough to cause a dangerous trigger setting even if the set screw was accidentally left out.

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            • #7
              Beautiful job! Excellent workmanship! Congratulations!

              Al

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              • #8
                What can I say that hasn't already been said?
                Congratulations, it absolutely gorgeous. You're right, the receiver looks very clean and elegant without the screws and pins.
                Very challenging project for one done only on the lathe, this takes a lot of ingenuity and planning.
                I know it will look "right" after the bluing process, but it looks pretty damn nice in the white too!
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                Location: British Columbia

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                • #9
                  Nice piece of work. The receiver should be color case hardened, not blued.

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                  • #10
                    That is a unique method of installing the tang & trigger group, and makes for a very clean action. John M. would be proud of you.

                    The choice of CCH versus blue on the receiver will depend on the material. I believe radkins has mentioned using 4140, if so, the receiver should be blued. Winchester furnished them either way, so either is correct. I believe Winchester used rust bluing which produces a much richer blue.

                    Next question is how did you full length octagon the barrel in the lathe?
                    Jim H.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tdmidget
                      Nice piece of work. The receiver should be color case hardened, not blued.
                      X2
                      Good point!
                      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                      Location: British Columbia

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tdmidget
                        Nice piece of work. The receiver should be color case hardened, not blued.

                        I really would like to color case harden, definitely my first choice if I had that option, but the receiver is 4140 HT and Color Case is not recommended. I started with a 3" x 1 -1/2" x 8" block of 4140 HT and milled the receiver, breechblock, firing pin and extractor out of it, the rest of the internals are case hardened 1026. I only discovered after I had started that color case was not a good idea for the 4140 and that 8620 would have been a better choice, at least for appearance.
                        Last edited by radkins; 08-27-2011, 11:26 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Beautiful work. Have you considered browning the major parts?

                          Even with that size barrel, she's gonna push back a bit when you touch off! I assume you are going to shoot black and a long bullet?

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                          • #14
                            Hmm

                            Nice Wood ..

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by HWooldridge
                              Beautiful work. Have you considered browning the major parts?

                              Even with that size barrel, she's gonna push back a bit when you touch off! I assume you are going to shoot black and a long bullet?
                              I think "browning" is a myth. I have several old recipes for it and what it boils down to is rust. The Brown Bess musket was painted brown. So I guess one can blue steel or park it out in the rain.

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