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  • Shapers and Slotters

    Instead of burying this in bridgeport thread I thought I'd put it out
    on its own..

    It appears I can get a used shaper and/or slotter cheaper than I
    can find a slotting head used from the UK.

    So my question (having never used either), can either of the two
    do the work of both?

    I mean, it appears that a shaper could be used as a slotter?

    A slotter looks like it could do some shaping but have limited
    capacity?

    Someone shed some light?

    Ideally I'd like to cut keyways and internal splines. But if I can get
    a shaper and still do that stuff, all the better.

    Most of the slotters I'm finding in my price range have a stroke
    of about 3-4", by the way. Seems a little small, but the price is right.

    -Tony

  • #2
    I've used a shaper to cut internal keyways, but it's usually easier to do the same operation in a lathe. As to cutting internal splines, one would need to set up an index head or rotary table on the shaper using an angle plate. Once again possible, but not the easiest thing to do.

    If your primary need is internal work, I recommend getting a slotting attachment, or better yet buy a set of internal broaches and an arbor press.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Dr Stan
      I've used a shaper to cut internal keyways, but it's usually easier to do the same operation in a lathe. As to cutting internal splines, one would need to set up an index head or rotary table on the shaper using an angle plate. Once again possible, but not the easiest thing to do.

      If your primary need is internal work, I recommend getting a slotting attachment, or better yet buy a set of internal broaches and an arbor press.

      ...& then it won't be long before you find you need to do a keyway in an odd sized bore....

      It's less work to set up the slotter/head than it is to make a special broach bushing.

      I used to have a little Elliott shaper, never got on well with it as a way of doing internal keyways.

      Tim

      Comment


      • #4
        Slotters are basically vertical shapers iirc.
        as such both are similar in use and tooling.
        However look down and you'll see a potential flaw (floor ) in a slotter.

        I used to have a shaper, but once the TOS mill arrived it had to go, or the east midlands would have unbalanced Tim's area

        Dave
        Just south of Sudspumpwater UK

        Comment


        • #5
          May I ask a quick question:
          why is it that most slotting heads don't have a clapper?


          :
          Thomas

          Problems worthy of attack prove their worth by hitting back
          - Piet Hein

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Thomas Staubo
            May I ask a quick question:
            why is it that most slotting heads don't have a clapper?
            :
            One reason would be that a lot of slotter work is internal, (keyways, splines) done with the tool on the end of a relatively long bar, making it difficult to achieve the proper "overhang" to make a clapper work properly.

            Another reason would be because of the orientation of the ram, (vertical) gravity is not nearly as beneficial.

            Dave

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Thomas Staubo
              May I ask a quick question:
              why is it that most slotting heads don't have a clapper?


              :
              Because they are not funny.
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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