Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

[Gloat!] Ultra Sonic Cleaner!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Don't use it for aluminum. If you need a demo, suspend a piece of aluminum foil half in and half out, hit go, and come back in a bit.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by John Stevenson
      Two quick questions:-

      Can you use kerosene [ paraffin to us ] for very dirty parts ? if not why ?

      Secondly why not clean bearings in them ?

      I have one of these, had it for about 5 years but it's still in the box.
      Thinking of using it for cleaning ball nuts off CNC ball screws prior to re-lubing.
      we have one in work for glass/bits an bobs, i asked the same question of the lab supplies we got it from and they replied that the bath evapourates solvent into the air faster, we use plain water in the bath, never put solutions into the tank apparently, we have loads of cut off plastic bottles/beakers etc we put the solution in and the part, the tank then stays clean as its only the crap in the bottle for throwing away, the stuf we use in the bottles is decon 90, good stuff it is to, but a bit of washing powder in water works well to, theres a sign on the machine, no solvents, strong acids/alkalis.
      regards
      mark
      http://www.zinsser-analytic.com/Cata...roduct/?id=170

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore
        Why not? I cleaned electronic circuit boards and many other electronic components in an untrasonic for years with no ill effects. You just have to use the correct cleaning solutions and wash off with clear water (preferably distilled) afterwards. A final rinse with alcohol (99% pure is best) will help dry them off. Allow to dry completely before powering up.

        You do need to be careful of any components that may be harmed by any of the steps in this. But there are very few that will be.

        Leftover flux can be troublesome. It can wash into switch or relay contacts or onto connector fingers and cause bad connections. It is best to rinse flux off with a flux remover solution (available in spray cans) first and make sure the solvent does not drain into any such places on the board or assembly.

        As a side note, years ago we used Freon TF solvent to clean electronics. I once saw a photo of an oscilloscope submerged in a tank of Freon TF while operating. It had a waveform displayed on it's tube's face and all indicator lights were on. Very safe solvent for electronics, but I guess it wasn't so good for the environment.

        You just have to use the right solvent. They make water based cleaning solutions for electronics. McMaster-Carr, among others, has them.
        It's not about the immersion, it's about the shock on bonding wires and crystals.
        This may be a paranoid stance by the Aerospace industry but we were never permitted to do it.
        Mike

        My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by John Stevenson
          Two quick questions:-

          Can you use kerosene [ paraffin to us ] for very dirty parts ? if not why ?

          Secondly why not clean bearings in them ?

          I have one of these, had it for about 5 years but it's still in the box.
          Thinking of using it for cleaning ball nuts off CNC ball screws prior to re-lubing.

          You can, but it is supposed to be dangerous... I don't use kero, but something lighter and more volitile - here it's called Coleman lantern fluid (white gas) in a thin Pyrex coffee pot (IMHO transmits the ultrasonic waves better than plastic bottles) often and have never had a problem, but that doesn't make it "not dangerous". Some will say that the ultrasonic frequency is optimized for water, and other fluids will not work. Sure....

          Bearings - the "conventional wisdom" is that you will damage the races/ball with the vibration. Ultrasonic cleaning action is from the micro-shock waves causes by cavitation bubbles collapsing. I have put a lot of carbon encrusted and gooey custom bearings from small engines into the tanks, and had them come out clean as a whistle, and no apparent damage. The are still in operation today at speeds 15k...

          .
          Last edited by lakeside53; 09-04-2011, 06:45 PM.

          Comment


          • #20
            This unit is tiny. No chance of running electronic items in it.

            Perhaps a couple of small turned or milled parts... that's it.
            "The Administration does not support blowing up planets." --- Finally some SENSIBLE policy from the Gov!

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by lakeside53
              . Some will say that the ultrasonic frequency is optimized for water, and other fluids will not work.

              .
              That is FUNNY. :-) Certainly the best one I've seen in a long time. :-)
              ...lew...

              Comment


              • #22
                I run bearings in mine but only long enough to get them clean or loosen the crud. I don't think mine has enough guts to damage them. I have seen steel parts that were left in a commercial tank for a long time come out with a frosted look from the cavitation action.

                Comment

                Working...
                X