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  • Bryce.R
    replied
    [
    He's got two other threads in another section of the forum that are also entitled "Roughing cuts", and in only one of them did we learn it's a 1985 build date machine with a 1250mm bed length. Still no idea of the make, model HP, swing, tool holders, insert shapes, grades, chipbreakers or brands; a dearth of information.

    I am only new to machineing so i dont know all of the fancy terms as yet.
    Lathe= 1985 mcmillan lathe bed length 1250mm
    1 hp im pretty sure could be 1.5 but its in that area anyway
    Toolholder came with the lathe so im not sure what brand.
    triangleular incerts from kennametal
    swing?

    Leave a comment:


  • PixMan
    replied
    I guess I'm just the impatient type, but getting full, accurate details from "Bryce.R" is like trying to get agreement on Capitol Hill about mandated health care. The latter may actually be easier, and the odd thing is that we're all just trying to help him solve problems.

    He's got two other threads in another section of the forum that are also entitled "Roughing cuts", and in only one of them did we learn it's a 1985 build date machine with a 1250mm bed length. Still no idea of the make, model HP, swing, tool holders, insert shapes, grades, chipbreakers or brands; a dearth of information.

    Good luck getting any more than that. I give up.

    Leave a comment:


  • hareng
    replied
    I understand him, its no great shakes of a cut just over 2mm. Whether thats off the diameter or the actual cut?

    Either way its not much of a cut and will be either down to material flex, tool height/blunt or more probable is the machine is flexing whether thats the headstock bearings or slides and castings.

    Speed the revs up as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bryce.R
    replied
    Feed is one of the lower ones could be 0.0046 or 0.046 not sure as im not at the lathe at the moment. steel 1 inch dia

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  • beckley23
    replied
    The OP has asked this before(check his prior posts) and didn't provide any more information, other than a very vague description of the lathe, after several requests.
    I think he's using the metric system, so he's probably talking about a .031"(.8MM) DOC.

    The OP is going to have to provide more information about the set-up such as; material diameter , how much is sticking out of the chuck, is the end supported, speed, and feed. Simply put, there are too many variables for an answer.
    Harry

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  • Carld
    replied
    I would still like to know what kind of lathe he's using to take .080" on a side at 250 rpm with a feed of .046" per revolution.

    That would be like cutting a 2 tpi thread. It must be one damn big lathe.

    Leave a comment:


  • .RC.
    replied
    Originally posted by Davo J
    Bright bar is quite common over here and is just polished mild steel without the scale.
    http://www.buau.com.au/english/files/BMS.pdf

    Dave
    Well it is just the finish really... Nothing to do with the grade, but yea most people associate bright steel with 1020 even though it refers to the finish only rather then mill scale finish.. (black)

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  • jungle_geo
    replied
    Just turn whatever machine that is operating with whatever cutter you are using on whatever material you are working on to the OFF position and the chatter should stop.
    I hope this helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • PixMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Davo J
    Bright bar is quite common over here and is just polished mild steel without the scale.
    http://www.buau.com.au/english/files/BMS.pdf

    Dave
    We just call it "TGP rod" (Turned, Ground and Polished rod), and the 1045 and 4140 are the most-commonly used steels. If you're going to bother, it might as well be decent quality steel.

    Leave a comment:


  • macona
    replied
    You just have crappy material.

    Leave a comment:


  • Davo J
    replied
    Originally posted by PixMan
    What is a "bright bar"? I've machined lots of steel, stainless steel, cast iron, non-ferrous metals, plastics, ceramics and composites, none were referred to as "bright bar".

    Is that a local term for aluminum or something?

    Wow....046" per rev! My lathe tops out at 1/2 that, and it's 5HP. You're pulling a lot of HP with a feed like that. Right there could be a source of chatter.

    The depth of cut and spindle speed mean little without knowing diameter, workpiece and tool materials. It's all about SFM rates.

    Bright bar is quite common over here and is just polished mild steel without the scale.
    http://www.buau.com.au/english/files/BMS.pdf

    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • gcude
    replied
    What's the diameter of the workpiece?

    Larger diameter will need slow speeds, small diameter needs increasing speeds to keep your SFM up.

    Leave a comment:


  • PixMan
    replied
    What is a "bright bar"? I've machined lots of steel, stainless steel, cast iron, non-ferrous metals, plastics, ceramics and composites, none were referred to as "bright bar".

    Is that a local term for aluminum or something?

    Wow....046" per rev! My lathe tops out at 1/2 that, and it's 5HP. You're pulling a lot of HP with a feed like that. Right there could be a source of chatter.

    The depth of cut and spindle speed mean little without knowing diameter, workpiece and tool materials. It's all about SFM rates.
    Last edited by PixMan; 09-04-2011, 10:37 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Carld
    replied
    That must be a very strong lathe to take .080" on a side at 250 rpm with a feed of .046" per revolution.

    Leave a comment:


  • gcude
    replied
    HSS or Carbide?

    Carbide likes deeper and faster.

    Are your gibs snug?

    Leave a comment:

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