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Photo: Machine Shop C&TS RR 2003

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  • Photo: Machine Shop C&TS RR 2003

    Work being done in the Cumbres And Toltec Scenic Railroad machine shop, Chama New Mexico. Note the use of a soft center trued up in the chuck to enable working between centers without removing the chuck.
    THAT OLD GANG 'O MINE

  • #2
    I have a friend who rode that railroad. It seems to me he had a video of the shop doing a restoration of an engine. I remember the fire ring used to heat shrink the tires on the driving wheels.
    The guy looks about to nod off, hope he doesn't get his beard caught.
    Jim H.

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    • #3
      Soft centers are most helpful,they can be adapted to many different stuations.

      Carl,did you ride the railroad while you were there?
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        I've been there several times but I usually chase the trains up and down the pass with my camera and camcorder. My Basset Hounds are always with us and they won't sell them a ticket. Until very recently there was unlimited access to the machine shop which I really enjoyed, but alas due to personality conflicts and politics of the current operators, that policy has been changed, at least for the time being. Everytime I've been in the shop, the only way I've ever seen them turn between centers is with a soft center trued in a chuck. It is a neat trick.
        THAT OLD GANG 'O MINE

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        • #5
          Notice where the dog leg is? I wonder if he's grinding in reverse. By the way, that is one MONSTER TP grinder! Does everyone run in reverse when grinding? I don't. Should I be? I seem to get a better finish on slow forward and running the grinder at top-end. (25,000 rpm)

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          • #6
            It seems to me that running in reverse works better as it adds that little bit more SFM to the cut.

            That guy is a rank amature at beard growing. He has more gut than I do but that is because I put all my spare energy into growing hair, well, at least on my chin.

            I used to get crap in the army for not shaving. I would shave at five AM and by noon it would look like I hadn't shaved at all. That is why I have a beard. It's warmer too.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              Grinding with opposite rotation usually works better (not always), but the change in surface speed is minute. It is nice to have the sparks/grit shot downward. Do whatever works best for you, which may not necessarily be the same for the next job.

              [This message has been edited by Joel (edited 01-27-2004).]
              Location: North Central Texas

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              • #8
                Neat how they have a suction hose to draw away as much of the grit as possible. I am not a train expert. What is he making? Any idea?

                Spkrman15

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                • #9
                  It's a piston rod for a steam locomotive. A flat disc piston will attach to one end, the other end extends out the back end of the cylinder to a crosshead that supports the rear end of the piston rod to keep the piston running square in the bore. The crosshead is connected to the wheels through the main rod and side rods.

                  [This message has been edited by Carl (edited 01-27-2004).]

                  [This message has been edited by Carl (edited 01-27-2004).]
                  THAT OLD GANG 'O MINE

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                  • #10
                    I've used the soft center in the chuck many times. It's a real pain to change a large chuck. Also comes in handy when you don't have a drive / face plate and headstock center for your lathe.
                    Frank

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                    • #11
                      I dont think i'll ever use a tool post grinder on my lathe, been scared to death by horror stories on this board, and with Nhengs Maximat 11.
                      At first, I thought it was an axle, then looked at the shape of it, yeh had to be a piston rod.
                      You know, I look at that picture, and I wonder mostly is if he took enough precaution to keep the grit off the way.
                      Damn you guys, you made me paranoid about grinder dust.

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                      • #12
                        Carl,
                        You answered one question, but posed another for me....what is the loco in the photo? I have never seen anything like those large counterweights?!

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                        • #13
                          Peter S, The locomotive is a K-37 built by Baldwin, K stands for 2-8-2 wheel arrangment,37 for 37,000 lbs. tractive effort. These engines were built using a standard gauge frame and boiler, but since it is narrow gauge, the wheels have been moved inside the frame rather than outside where they normally would be. The counter weights are normally cast into the wheels, but due to the confined space inside the frame and the small diameter of the wheels(small diameter wheels effectively gear down the locomotive for mountain use)the counter weights were moved outside of the frame in this design. I'm attaching an action photo of the same engine taken in 1937.

                          [This message has been edited by Carl (edited 01-28-2004).]
                          THAT OLD GANG 'O MINE

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