Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ruining a file

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ruining a file

    How long does it take to ruin a good file by cleaning the teeth on a wire wheel?
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    Less time than it took you to type the question.

    Comment


    • #3
      yep. Don't do it.
      It's only ink and paper

      Comment


      • #4
        The best way to clean a file is with a thin piece of wood not a wire brush! I use paint mixing sticks (paint paddles?), just push the end of it across the teeth of the file and they will instantly form groves that will easily clean the teeth all the way to the bottom. I was taught that trick years ago and I have never found anything that works as good, file cards will ruin a file just like any other wire brush.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a post here somewhere on rejuvenating your dull files by soaking them in muriatic acid. It does work well.

          JL....................

          Comment


          • #6
            Cleaning a file on a wire wheel is the first step to converting it to a scraper handle. See McGyver's scraping series in the HSM magazine

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by JoeLee
              I have a post here somewhere on rejuvenating your dull files by soaking them in muriatic acid. It does work well.

              JL....................
              I toss mine out on the lawn over night.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by radkins
                The best way to clean a file is with a thin piece of wood not a wire brush! I use paint mixing sticks (paint paddles?), just push the end of it across the teeth of the file and they will instantly form groves that will easily clean the teeth all the way to the bottom. I was taught that trick years ago and I have never found anything that works as good, file cards will ruin a file just like any other wire brush.
                I've never heard anyone else mention the wood trick but I've also done that for many years. I discovered it by accident one day when I was trying to remove some stubborn clogs that the file card would't touch. A brass brush also works well for general work but I think wood is better.

                Another tip to good filing is to either keep it well chalked and dry - or - heavily oiled. The latter works well when filing in the lathe; the oil keeps the chips moving out of the teeth (file needs to be sloppy wet and dripping with oil).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by HWooldridge
                  Another tip to good filing is to either keep it well chalked and dry - or - heavily oiled. The latter works well when filing in the lathe; the oil keeps the chips moving out of the teeth (file needs to be sloppy wet and dripping with oil).


                  Chalking a file is a must IMO, I keep soap stone just for that purpose and the only oil I ever use is light oil to prevent rusting. I have about 20 different files right now of various types and sizes, most just standard single cut mill files and I have a few double cut flat files but I just don't use the double cut very much. I have found that long cut lathe files are very useful for far more than just for a lathe and in fact I can get a smoother and faster cut when draw-filing by using a lathe file than with any other type. Chalk or soap stone makes all the difference when using a file and I never try to file anything without chalking first, by doing this I rarely get any clogging that does not just shake off when the corner of the file is lightly tapped against a piece of hard wood. I would not even think of hitting my files with a steel wire brush of any kind including a file card, no need to since those wooden paint sticks work MUCH better and won't hurt the file at all!
                  Last edited by radkins; 09-14-2011, 12:20 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I do the same trick as the wood stick, but with a piece of annealed copper tubing hammered flat....it cuts teeth like the wood does, but might be a tad more effective...being soft, when pushed along the teeth, it doesn't do any damage...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I particularly like bamboo for cleaning files, and a few years ago i made a special little holder for bamboo slips - it hangs on the rack with my files:

                      Cheers,

                      Frank Ford
                      HomeShopTech

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well, we have several files at work that need to be thrown outside, soaked in muriatic acid, or converted into scrapers

                        No wonder I can't find a sharp file there. Thanks for the tips.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Radkin has it right. A wood stick sharpened like a chisel is my favorite files sleaning out impliment. If it's strongly pinned I use a sharp scribe to pick them out knowing the nearby teeth may be dinged.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Wood works good. I inherited a whole drawer full of files and they came with two file cards. The file cards are pretty much all I use to clean them. Haven't dulled a file yet and there are a couple that I use near daily and also clean daily, no problems.

                            I spray the whole drawer down with lubricating spray from time to time so they don't rust. Rust will ruin a file before any file card will.
                            Andy

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              vpt: There are those who advocate RUSTING their files to sharpen them!! I am not one of them.

                              The term "file card"comes from the original practice of having a stack of shims like a deck of cards,to push across files parallel with their teeth to clear them. Using a copper tube,piece of wood or bamboo,etc. all act in this same way.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X