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CAD or Old Style Drafting???

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  • #46
    I get paid to play with the accronyms on a daily basis (CAD, CAM, CNC, CMM.)

    Everything at work gets a design, or 3d model to pull dimension/toolpaths from. When I do stuff for myself that doesn't involve the CNC and it's all manual work, I rarely do cad work. Just paper sketches, of which I have notebooks full, or just do it straight from NeuroCAD. It's pretty easy for me to visualize and work out complex designs in my head. I sometimes struggle with the math to link it all together and make it work, but that's where the paper, pencil and calculator come in. Very rarely do I do a cad drawing for a personal project, unless it involves the CNC. I think it's kind of a release from work. Cad modeling used to be fun, until it became a job.

    The most enjoyable projects for me are the ones where the computer never even gets turned on.
    Last edited by Dan Dubeau; 09-26-2011, 06:01 PM.

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    • #47
      I have been doing "paper drafting" since 1972 in school, learned it as a career in 1978 to 1980 and in engineering school from 1982 to 1987. During Engineering school I also helped set up the first AutoCad lab at our college, 1983. Been doing them both since DOS, tablet tables, then mouses and such right to touch screen. Most of my drawings are now CAD as ease of changes are superior time wise. Still do Orthographic drawings as well as soild modeling in Inventor, Solidworks, Cadkey, MasterCam, and now EdgeCam. Still have times I go pencil and paper though, sometimes the really small "detail views" can be dimensioned more accurately.

      I do firmly believe this though, a person who took pencil drafting and is competent at it will be a better CAD draftsman in the long run, knowing how to find the missing dimensions, and completing a more detailed drawing in the process. The pencil draftsman using CAD will know when a view becomes cluttered or perhaps bogus, and will know that a theoretical point of dimension needs to be dimensioned to be checked in a true form with real tools. I have often in other jobs had to call for corrections or clarification of dimensioning on CAD generated drawings made by someone without pencil background - or line types that are not quite to spec.

      CAD/CAM is still the best way to do difficult matched arc CNC lathe drawings though, and surfacing, CAD is absolute.


      All said though, making parts by true intuition to fit and without that sketch being updated - using the machining skills is a true art form.
      CCBW, MAH

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      • #48
        Originally posted by spope14

        I do firmly believe this though, a person who took pencil drafting and is competent at it will be a better CAD draftsman in the long run, knowing how to find the missing dimensions, and completing a more detailed drawing in the process. The pencil draftsman using CAD will know when a view becomes cluttered or perhaps bogus, and will know that a theoretical point of dimension needs to be dimensioned to be checked in a true form with real tools. I have often in other jobs had to call for corrections or clarification of dimensioning on CAD generated drawings made by someone without pencil background - or line types that are not quite to spec.
        Not to totally disagree with you ( I agree to a point), but I never took any manual drafting classes whatsoever (I'm one of the youngin's.) My design's now are very workable, easy to read, all needed dimensions etc, but they weren't always. When I came out of college, my designs were absolute ****. I still feel bad for the guys who had to build from them (I still work with a few of those guys, and they remind me from time to time ). What made them better, was not manual drafting (though I can really see how that would help a bit) but was to get a better understanding of the various manufacturing processes. What was capable/what wasn't. I got that by talking with the toolmakers, machine operators, and eventually over the years; building the very things I was designing.

        I've worked with designers, and engineers over the years that surely had years of manual drafting experience prior to the cad generation, but were so far removed from the manufacturing process their stuff was so overcomplicated to build. We're working on a project like that right now. Building of an outsourced design. Some details are just so overly complicated it pained me to make them.

        I don't do very much designing anymore, but what I do now is light years better than when I started, and manual drafting had nothing to do with it. I can see how it would have help a little, but honestly I doubt it would have made much of a difference. **** designers are **** designers, whether manual on a table, or cad. The manual ones just go through more pencils....

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Mcruff
          The beauty of Cadkey, it doesn't need to use coordinates at all, it draws in CAD just like you would on a board, thats the main reason I always recommend it. It cares not where something is, only its relationship to everything else. It will literally run circles around Autocad with less key strokes to boot.
          Cadkey! (good grief is that program still alive??)

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