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  • Lathe chuck removal tips

    Hi Everyone,

    I think that I have a couple of tools to make removing & installing chucks easier and safer.

    The first is a simple block of wood that is bandsawed with vee grooves to fit the bed and a curve to fit the chuck to remove/install. I wish I could take credit for the idea but that last shop I worked in had blocks like this made for each lathe & chuck setup.

    The other tool is my own idea (as far as I know) and is a piece of 1 3/4 hex stock welded to a flat strap which is welded inside of a flattened tube.

    This way ALL the jaws bear the force of loosening the chuck, not just one or two.

    When I bought this lathe used 37+ years ago I bought a brand new 6 jaw Buck chuck and the jaws are still tight in the body even though it has been on & off countless times through all these years of using it to make a living.

    I just wish that I had seen the block of wood idea sooner!!





    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

  • #2
    I've got a couple of questions for you, what is the piece of square stock on the front way (with the angle iron), used for.
    And what does the tube your switch is suspended on, bolt to.
    It looks like you have a 16" SB and I need to move my switch to about where your's is. Mine is to the left over the headstock, very inconvenient sometimes.

    THANX RICH

    People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!
    People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by v860rich
      I've got a couple of questions for you, what is the piece of square stock on the front way (with the angle iron), used for.
      And what does the tube your switch is suspended on, bolt to.
      It looks like you have a 16" SB and I need to move my switch to about where your's is. Mine is to the left over the headstock, very inconvenient sometimes.

      THANX RICH
      Hi Rich,

      The block that you noticed is for a tracing attachment I made and posted at:

      http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...t=48109&page=3

      Post #24.

      You're correct that I have a 16in SB. Good eyes!

      The switch tube is mounted on a cast junction box in the rear.

      I always assumed that it was an original SB item. The lathe is around a 1952 as I recall.

      Although it is somewhat convenient in this position, I have been thinking of moving it the front spindle bearing cap on the operator's side of the spindle, or near the front spindle oil cup.

      Through the years there has been more than once where I didn't like reaching over a spinning chuck, part. fixture etc. to reach it for shut off. For safety reasons I think it is better in front of the spindle.
      Last edited by jhe.1973; 09-20-2011, 01:47 AM.
      Best wishes to ya’ll.

      Sincerely,

      Jim

      "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

      "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm curious, what do you use to hold the spindle when you use your "wrench" in the chuck to undo it?
        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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        • #5
          I just lock it in back gear.

          However I don't do really heavy, long term intermittent cutting.

          My chucks are changed fairly often so this way of locking has worked OK so far.
          Best wishes to ya’ll.

          Sincerely,

          Jim

          "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

          "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

          Comment


          • #6
            I use a similar set-up but mine is a flat board with a single cleat on the back side instead of a full contour saddle. Makes for simpler manuevering. The board has a little slope toward the cleat and a hook to keep it from tipping up. All for safety.

            When the chck hits the cleat it's lined up to the spindle. My 4 jaw weighs just over 100 lb so a wood chuck gadget saves me a sprung back and lame wrists.

            Nice simple arrangement but you need a different wood thingy for each chuck or faceplate. One of these days a chuck crane. Yet another round tuit project.
            Last edited by Forrest Addy; 09-20-2011, 03:54 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jhe.1973
              You're correct that I have a 16in SB. Good eyes!:
              As many "miles" as I've stood in front of one of those I'd recognize it by touch!!!

              THANX RICH

              People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!
              People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                I had considered making a wood cradle for a long time.
                It wasn't until my 4 jaw rolled off the back of the lathe on to the floor, that I finally was sufficiently motivated to do it. Works great; puts the chuck right in line with the spindle for easy mounting.

                Wish I'd done it sooner ...before the mishap!
                Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                Comment


                • #9
                  It only took droping my 4 jaw onto my fingers.. protecting the ways, before I decided on finding a chunk of UHMW to put there instead Not as close a fit, but it does keep it off the ways at least. D3-1 is a little easyer at keeping it from spining off fortunaly.
                  Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for the info! I've known about the wooden block for a long time, but I recently acquired a 1983 Enco and the chuck has never been off. I thought about drilling a hole in the side for a spanner wrench or something, but I thought there had to be a proper way to do it.

                    I think I'll go get a large Allen wrench socket and put it on a breaker bar. For a 4-jaw, I'll get an 8-point socket and put a piece of key stock in it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have seen the wood block idea before, but could never see a need for it. I have a piece of hardwood dowel for each chuck that will fit in the spindle bore and protrude about 8 inches out of each side of the chuck, once the chuck is loose, insert dowel and lightly grip it in the chuck, then when removing hang on the the outer end and as the chuck comes off it is still supported in the spindle bore until it is off far enough to grab on that end. You have full control of the chuck at all times and a handle on each end to carry it by. No need to even get close to the bed removing or installing.
                      James

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                      • #12
                        I took great pains to get that wood cradle I made just the right height so the chucks will align perfectly for threading onto the spindle.
                        However there's still the friction between the chuck and wood surface, so I still have to do some slight lifting and finagling, which is painful (arthritic hands).

                        I've since thought it would be nice to have some roller bearings embedded into the block, so the chuck could be turned more easily.
                        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by J. Randall
                          I have seen the wood block idea before, but could never see a need for it. I have a piece of hardwood dowel for each chuck that will fit in the spindle bore and protrude about 8 inches out of each side of the chuck, once the chuck is loose, insert dowel and lightly grip it in the chuck, then when removing hang on the the outer end and as the chuck comes off it is still supported in the spindle bore until it is off far enough to grab on that end. You have full control of the chuck at all times and a handle on each end to carry it by. No need to even get close to the bed removing or installing.
                          James
                          Even better!

                          I just spent the last hour in my shop cutting some 3/8" plate to use for removing my chuck, rather then the Allen wrench socket I mentioned above. I made a hex one for my 3-jaw (and someday maybe a 6-jaw) and a square one for my 4-jaw. Tomorrow, I'll smooth up the edges and put square holes in them and I'll try removing my chuck.

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                          • #14
                            J. Randall
                            Thank you for the idea. I think this would work great with my overhead crane. Instead of wood I will use a turned #1018 shaft.

                            Bob

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                            • #15
                              even if you have a bar, I might recommend at leats a chunk of UHMW or plywood or other similar soft material to place over the bed ways so that just incase you accidently slip, or are just not expecting the weight and it falls, it won't dent the bedways.
                              Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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