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OT - Quaint Names (town, street, etc.)

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  • #76
    In OKC two streets, none such road and first gravel road
    Bond

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    • #77
      I say it's no coincidence that Intercourse, PA is so close to Paradise, PA.
      For those of you with no partner, however, Bird in Hand, PA is just down the road.

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      • #78
        Originally posted by DickDastardly40
        For unusual place names in the UK
        Isn't there a place in the UK known as "Middle Wallop"? IIRC in between over Wallop and Nether Wallop?

        Back over here, I pass a turnoff for "Raccoon" in Indiana South of Crawfordsville.

        And somewhere along I70 in Indiana or thereabouts is a place apparently called "Little Point". I have never stopped there, for obvious reasons.
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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        • #79
          I lived on Mistletoe Lane near Summerville, SC, for fifteen years.
          Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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          • #80
            This maybe a little off the original topic but in Durham, NC there are streets with the same name as my first, middle and last name. In fact the street with the same name as my first runs right into the street with my last name. So there is a sign post with my first and last names on it, and in the correct order. Not the best part of town, but hey who's counting. A couple of blocks over there is a street with the same name as my father's middle name.

            Ed P

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            • #81
              Originally posted by Bill736
              I say it's no coincidence that Intercourse, PA is so close to Paradise, PA.
              For those of you with no partner, however, Bird in Hand, PA is just down the road.
              That makes one wonder about the veracity of the saying "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush". "The Bird of Paradise" I can understand.
              Kansas City area

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              • #82
                Originally posted by Toolguy
                That makes one wonder about the veracity of the saying "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush". "The Bird of Paradise" I can understand.

                Actually the saying is
                "A one in the hand is worth two in Kate Bush "
                .

                Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                • #83
                  On Ohio Route 7, just across the river from Moundsville, WV, is the town of Dilles Bottom.

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                  • #84
                    Originally posted by sasquatch
                    Southern Ontario had "Punkydoodles Corners".
                    I know that spot, I've been there as some of my wifes extended family lives near it.

                    There's a street in Calgary named Bison Path.

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                    • #85
                      Wankers Corners, Oregon

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                      • #86
                        In the city of Kingston-upon-Hull (usually called "Hull") in Yorkshire, England, there is a narrow street in the older part of town called "Land of Green Ginger"



                        Malc.

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                        • #87
                          Wotton-Under-Edge

                          Wotton is a very common English place name. I grew up in one, not the "Under-Edge" one though. It is believed to be derived from the Saxon
                          "Wudetun" meaning the enclosure, homestead or village (tun) in or near the wood (wude).

                          As for Under-Edge, you only have to go there, it is a town located beneath the very steep edge of the Cotswold hills as they drop off into the Severn Valley.

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                          • #88
                            I once lived on Glendale street. It is either redundant or an oxymoron or both all by itself:

                            glen: Noun: A narrow valley.
                            dale: Noun: A valley, esp. a broad one.

                            So the street was named after a broad narrow valley. Or a valley valley. Or....

                            Either way it's weird

                            Dan
                            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                            Location: SF East Bay.

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                            • #89
                              Not so quaint...

                              A large number of medieval English Cities had streets named Gropec*nt Lane, where not surprisingly the ladies of the night plied their trade. None remain today after gradual cleaning up of street names over the centuries.

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                              • #90
                                In between Pickering and Toronto, Finch Ave is connected to Old Finch Ave by "Plug Hat Rd." It then becomes Finch Ave again!

                                Geoff

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