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Photo: Krupp Works 1923

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  • Photo: Krupp Works 1923

    THAT OLD GANG 'O MINE

  • #2
    Good Lawd......

    John

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    • #3
      I guess it isn't just a matter of "Hey, Joe, give me a hand stacking and organizing this stuff"...

      BTW, you just gave away your source.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        Just one of many sources.
        THAT OLD GANG 'O MINE

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        • #5
          The lathe looks bass-ackwards doesn't it; like maybe they flipped the negative.

          Look at the tool posts on the two carriages. There seems to be one on each side of the machine. 4 tools? One on each side? heavier cuts possible without deflection the part?Makes sense if you increase productivity.

          I could make guesses til the cows come home as to the purpose of all thise forgings in the foreground but it would be pure speculation. Krupp was probably the largest and most competitive heavy industry manufacturer.

          Anyone ever read "The Arms of Krupp" by William Manchester? It's a good look at the evolution of the Industrial Revolution as well as one of the foundations of the Third Reich. Manchester is an excellent biographer. He makes the story unfold before your eyes.

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          • #6
            Where did they find such small people to use a lathe? I am curious what are they making. Any clue?

            Spkrman15

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            • #7
              Well, it's Krupp, so it's likely (though by no means certain) they're gun barrels. Artillery or tank gun tubes, maybe?

              Looks to me like a single forging or casting that's machined in a mirror-image, then probably sawed in half. Maybe. Interesting the four tool posts and the central roller/support between 'em.

              Doc.
              Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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              • #8
                Yeah Forrest, it's a good read. I recomend it if only for the history of technology it offers.

                Doc. not only gun barrels but almost any heavy forging. Krupps was the go to place.


                Are those railroad eccentrics in the foreground?

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                • #9
                  Forgot to ad. I don't care where Carl gets em. They are nice suprise to find here and he saves me the effort of wading around the intenet. Thanks Carl.

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                  • #10
                    I think the history of the Krupp family goes back to midevel times. They were the leaders of anything to do with metal. They came up with stainless steel and many others.
                    Michael

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                    • #11
                      Notice that in a lot of Carl's pictures the shop is high bay with a bridge crane. I wonder if any home shops have bridge cranes and high ceilings. That concept is still the best idea going for a shop.

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                      • #12
                        My garage shop has 10 1/2 foot ceiling. On the "list" for this year is a track and chain fall, but no bridge crane. Hmmm... a little bridge crane wouldn't be out of the question....
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          I've always wanted to build a two bay shop with a bridge crane and a pit in one bay. In the pit I'de have a trolley on rails with a transmission jack mounted on it. Then I could pull transmissions or differentials, roll them out of under the vehicle, and hook on to them with the bridge crane to take them to the bench. That bridge crane would be great for moving those heavy machine tools into and around the shop. Many small railroads had just such a shop with the bays in the front and the machine shop in the back with the bridge crane extending over the entire shop so that components could be taken to and from the machine shop directly to the work bays.
                          THAT OLD GANG 'O MINE

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                          • #14
                            In the mid 60's I met a gentleman in Kent, Ohio who had a two car garage with a tall ceiling and an "I" beam with a chainfall. It ran the whole lenght of the center of the first bay and he had bent it into a nice gentle radius so that it went from that bay over the long work bench along the back wall of the other bay. Quite handy I thought!

                            Regards, Ken

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