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  • Atlas Lathe Questions

    Hello Folks,
    Been lurking here for quite a while trying to learn about machine work. Most of what ya'll talk about is way over my head but I pick up a little here an there.
    I have bought an Atlas 6" lathe (one of the newer ones 8 speeds no counter shaft) to try and learn on.I notice that theres not much mention of these lathes on the forums I've been reading.Most folks seem to go for the imported mini lathes.I got a pretty good deal on this machine, at least going by what I've seen on ebay. I have less than 1/2 of what i've seen simarly equiped machines go for in it.I have been through the mechanical parts and have cleaned, adjusted oiled etc. it runs well but I havn't beenable to check it for accuracy yet.Gotta figure out how first.
    I guess my question would be:
    Would a new guy trying to learn be better off with an older perhaps worn USA machine or a brand new import?

    Thanks
    Sandy Jackson

    (more stupid questions to come)

  • #2
    Hi Sandy
    What model # would that lathe of youres be? I have the atlas mod.#10100 and craftman mod.# 101.03714 and used the latter extensively to build the HOLT engine, a steam model turbine, alive steam display and various accessories for the lathe. Its a great machine, just not a real rigid one like the bigger models. Go right ahead and use it,thats why you got it. Start out easy on it till you get used to what it can handle and what youre capable of doing with it and good luck.Got any questions ?
    I'd be glad to answer when I can.
    Thanks
    Johnny O
    johnny o

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    • #3
      Hi Sandy,
      I don't think it really matters. You do with whatever you may have. If your bearings and gibs are tight, the first check is to just turn down a bar and see if it the same diameter on both ends. You probably want to indicate your chuck to see that it runs fairly true. You learn by making chips!
      Location: North Central Texas

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      • #4
        Hello Sandy,
        Get started with what you have. As time goes on you will be able judge for your self if you need a new one or a bigger one. It will depend a lot on what you are interested in building and your interests may change, or should I say develope, over time.

        BTW I don't recall reading a stupid question on this BBS before so it's unlikely that you will ever ask one. Welcome aboard.
        To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

        Comment


        • #5
          The 6" Atlas lathe is a good machine. It has an advantage over Sherline and other small machines in that it is a real lathe,and uses more readily available tooling, and can cut threads with no special adapters.
          Use it and enjoy it.
          You probably don't hear much about these because the people who own them are happily machining away, not having to rebuild them or manufacture parts to make them work in the first place.
          Jim H.

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          • #6
            Don't think it really matters either,its the man behind the machine that makes the difference.I have seen work done to exact tolerances with just hand tools and a drill press.Its all in the willingness to learn.
            I just need one more tool,just one!

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Sandy,
              I bought a 6" Craftsman/Atlas lathe in the late 60's and still have it today. I have done a ton of work on it and with proper care, adjustment and oiling it will do a great job for you. I posted a note awhile back with a link to pictures of my shop. In there you will see my Craftsman lathe and some of the work that can be done on it.
              gbritnell

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              • #8
                Hi again,
                The thread is Model Engines on Photobucket.
                It's on page 3 of the posts.
                gbritnell

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for all the help & encouragement.
                  My next experiment is to try & cut some threads.
                  I've posted som pics of the little lathe and the accesories that came with it if anyone would care to look.Also there's some shots of a jig I made to grind the cutting tools.
                  Thanks Again
                  Sandy Jackson
                  http://img9.photobucket.com/albums/v...nder_jig_2.jpg
                  http://img9.photobucket.com/albums/v...rinder_jig.jpg
                  http://img9.photobucket.com/albums/v...athe_stuff.jpg
                  http://img9.photobucket.com/albums/v...athe/Lathe.jpg

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice little lathe. You did a good job on the grinder.
                    To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sandy,

                      What did you end up paying for the lathe? I have 2 of them, and am thinking about putting one on Ebay. Don't have all the accessories that you got with yours, but they do have some tooling.

                      Thanks..........
                      RPease

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