Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Wilson Greatbatch: the death of a "humble tinkerer"

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Wilson Greatbatch: the death of a "humble tinkerer"

    A name unknown to most of us, I imagine:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/28/bu...ies-at-92.html

    Wilson Greatbatch, Pacemaker Inventor, Dies at 92



    "Wilson Greatbatch, a professed “humble tinkerer” who, working in his barn in 1958, designed the first practical implantable pacemaker, a device that has preserved millions of lives, died on Tuesday at his home in Williamsville, N.Y. He was 92.

    ...

    Mr. Greatbatch patented more than 325 inventions, notably a long-life lithium battery used in a wide range of medical implants. He created tools used in AIDS research and a solar-powered canoe, which he took on a 160-mile voyage on the Finger Lakes in New York to celebrate his 72nd birthday.

    In later years, he invested time and money in developing fuels from plants and supporting work at the University of Wisconsin in Madison on helium-based fusion reaction for power generation.
    ..."

  • #2
    Although I never met Wilson, I did a lot of work for his son Warren who at the time ran the lithium plant part of the business. If Warren was cut from his fathers cloth then Wilson was a great man. The Buffalo New York area is very pround of Greatbatch family.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

    Comment


    • #3
      Sadly, people like him are few & far between
      John

      I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

      Comment


      • #4
        Yup. I remember reading an article about him in IEEE Spectrum around 10 years ago. They wrapped the first pacemaker in duct tape, thinking it would be good enough to keep it sealed, and that worked. Never will forget that comment :-)

        Originally posted by jugs
        Sadly, people like him are few & far between

        Comment


        • #5
          It's odd that pacemaker implants are so common that we do not generally even stop to think what an amazing thing that is, really.

          An unfortunate thing is that guys like this who do serious innovation are relatively unknown, but we market TV shows about stuff like the Orange County chopper guys and the "sons of guns" guys. I guess there is probably room for both, but we generally ignore folks who are doing (or have done) the real stuff it would seem.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by alanganes
            It's odd that pacemaker implants are so common that we do not generally even stop to think what an amazing thing that is, really.

            An unfortunate thing is that guys like this who do serious innovation are relatively unknown, but we market TV shows about stuff like the Orange County chopper guys and the "sons of guns" guys. I guess there is probably room for both, but we generally ignore folks who are doing (or have done) the real stuff it would seem.

            We also pay multi-millions to people to play with a ball or act like idiots on tv but farmers who put food on our tables struggle to make ends meet! What's wrong with that picture?

            Comment


            • #7
              I love to hear of these guys.like the ones who invented the m.r.i scanner who run out of money only short my $10.000 and was given this by a friend who'se only request was to be allowed to get the use of it if needed.Which eventually he did, it's another great story.Wonderful people. Alistair
              Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

              Comment


              • #8
                Did his pacemaker run out of battery power?
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Evan
                  Did his pacemaker run out of battery power?
                  If memory serves me correct, his pacemakers power requirements are what led to the development of the lithium battery. The company later split off and his son headed the lithium battery division where pace makers and the oil well industry were the largest clients. I've been in Warren's plant (the son) and head to dawn white paper suits and entered the dry room where the batteries were tigged together. The Bausch &Lomb stereo scope Warren gave me was one of the first ones his employees used in assembling the batteries. They use Leicas now.
                  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                  Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                  It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X