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OT - Couldn't find my pencil sharpener...

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  • OT - Couldn't find my pencil sharpener...





    Overkill?
    My cup 'o plasma: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1vMfmhM9fg No dialog, just ten minutes of dancing plasma and music. Turn on, tune in, space out.

  • #2
    A man's gotta do what a man's gotta do.
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

    THINK HARDER

    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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    • #3
      It makes sense to me, I use my lathe to scuff and deburr the ends of copper tubeing when doing plumbing jobs.

      On a side note, You might want to keep the 4 jaw out of the swarf pile though. They work and last far longer when their kept clean.

      Pete

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      • #4
        I can't wait to show my wife my $1K pencil sharpener.

        Tom
        Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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        • #5
          That's a bit high tech! What's wrong with a bench grinder?
          Paul Compton
          www.morini-mania.co.uk
          http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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          • #6
            Indicating the pencil in on a 4-jaw would have been overkill...

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            • #7
              I use my wood lathe to spin these cans of spray varnish/paint to mix them up well.I have not tried it on a normal can of paint yet too frightened I guess. it works great with spray cans. Alistair
              Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Alistair Hosie
                I use my wood lathe to spin these cans of spray varnish/paint to mix them up well.I have not tried it on a normal can of paint yet too frightened I guess. it works great with spray cans. Alistair
                I have an old kitchen blender/mixer (handheld) that my wife was tossing away; used it just a couple of days ago to mix a gallon of paint. Did a great job, with lots less elbow grease. ...also, you don't want that elbow grease getting into the paint.
                Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                • #9
                  Am I the only one who carries a simple pocket knife everywhere?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Arthur.Marks
                    Am I the only one who carries a simple pocket knife everywhere?
                    No but.... To steal and mutillate an old saying....

                    When you have a lathe, EVERYTHING is a turning project. Even sharpening the pencil for your Amish CAD system.
                    Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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                    • #11
                      I seem to recall that John S has (built) the ultimate pencil sharpener. Perhaps he will post a picture.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #12
                        Save me a trip through the Machinery's Handbook - what was the speed/feed and DOC, and carbide or HSS?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Alistair Hosie
                          I use my wood lathe to spin these cans of spray varnish/paint to mix them up well.I have not tried it on a normal can of paint yet too frightened I guess. it works great with spray cans. Alistair
                          Careful. Those press-fit lids aren't so...fit. When I used to use the paint mixer at ye olde mall job as a kid, those things would explode all over the place.

                          I have no comment on reports of bored sears hardware workers mixing up some godawful color then walking away from the mixer as it thrashed.

                          Originally posted by Evan
                          I seem to recall that John S has (built) the ultimate pencil sharpener. Perhaps he will post a picture.
                          I'm far too happy that I've been here long enough to know why that's funny
                          Last edited by madwilliamflint; 09-28-2011, 01:19 PM.
                          ----
                          Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

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                          • #14
                            Speeds and feeds

                            Oh, yes, of course, speeds and feeds. Thanks for the reminder dp.

                            Can you believe Machinery's Handbook has no information on speeds and feeds for graphite cored hardwood dowels?

                            Since the Sherline is variable speed I'll have to estimate but I'd say I was around 800 RPM.

                            As I was cutting graphite I naturally went for a carbide tipped cutter. Though, as you can tell from the blunt tip on the pencil the cutting tool height needed to be adjusted a bit.
                            My cup 'o plasma: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1vMfmhM9fg No dialog, just ten minutes of dancing plasma and music. Turn on, tune in, space out.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Cutting tool used




                              Here's the cutting edge I used. See my original post for a view from another angle.

                              Most of you are probably screaming at your computer screens right now.

                              It really does work quite well for a wide range of cutting. Since my little Sherline doesn't have a huge amount of torque or stiffness I tend to resort to really sharp cutting edges.

                              It is a carbide router bit (three bits from Horror Freight for $7.00, two carbide cutting surfaces per bit). The router bit is being held in a 1.5" aluminum square bar that has a different holder on each of its four faces.

                              It attaches to the cross slide with one screw and adjusts vertically with shims. This makes it a cinch to change the angle of the cutting edge against the work.

                              I've used it for facing and boring up to an inch and a quarter deep into steel.

                              The cutting edge can be resharpened easily since you're just using the outermost corner. All you do to make a fresh corner is square it up and run it past a diamond blade being turned in the lathe.
                              My cup 'o plasma: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1vMfmhM9fg No dialog, just ten minutes of dancing plasma and music. Turn on, tune in, space out.

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