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What is the best way to make these parts?

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  • What is the best way to make these parts?

    These parts were originally die case. I don't have a die cast machine so I will have to make them on my Bridgeport Mill unless I can find another way. I was thinking maybe a horizonal mill with 45 cutters for the full length of the part but 45 cutters is probably too many cutters. Maybe 5 cutters to cut each section with 5 slots there are 540 sections. If I do this 1 slot at a time that would be 2700 slots with the Bridgeport Mill that would require several months work. This part is 17" long by .750" by 1.500" with 45 slots per side. I worked in Die Casting for 20 years I use to make prototype dies some were poured by hand. I could build a 1 cavity prototype mold pre heated and hand pour but that will be a lot of work if I can not get it to fill. If I do get it to fill I would be lucky if I could hand pour it once an hour. CNC would be great but I don't have one.



    I have done 2 years of research and I already built a small one that works great. This part has 4 slots per side. 32 slots for the whole valve system.





    This is the finished product. A 20 lbs thrust pulse jet engine using German V1 Argus valves. 2 years of research and I have learned how to design and build an engine that will run for many many hours and the valves show no signs of damage or getting hot. The German V1 engine only had to run for 25 minutes. My full size German V1 engine should last for years with no signs of damage. I have a larger 60 lb thrust engine that starts easy, runs fine and it is 80% throttable. My next engine may be 250 lbs of thrust, then after that 850 lbs of thrust German V1 pulse jet engine.

    Here is the video of my 20 lb thrust engine.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwz7AvufWG4

    I figure it will take me a while to build this engine if I do most of the work myself. I am trying to find an easy way to cut the air intalk valve sections.
    Last edited by gary350; 09-29-2011, 09:28 PM.

  • #2
    Beautiful job there Gary!

    But that is one noisy sucker.
    No matter where you go, there you are!

    Hal C.

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    • #3
      But the mill didn't budge!

      Nice work.

      Chris

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      • #4
        Thats a great workshop heater & you wont hear the neighbors complaining

        Gang milling on a horizontal mill

        Lay all 15 units on bed & clamp.
        Gang mill (5 cutters) 15 sections to full depth/per traverse
        Reposition for next section & cut
        Repeat for all 9 sections

        Turn the 15 blocks over & repeat
        John

        I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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        • #5
          how much thrust will it take to propell the bridgeport, there is in fact no land speed record for a milling machine yet, nor lathe which may be a bit more areodynamic lol
          a beautiful job, as was mentioned by our good friend Jugs, a gang milling set up would work well, and its an excuse to by a nice horizontal if you dont have one [cinny!], how about plaster master and lost wax or foam, cnc the master and cast? you could then mass produce, a whole squadron of bridgeports would be a sight to behold, though looping the loop might disloge the table!, or shower the spectators with swarf
          keep up the good work, when you starting V1 testing
          all the best mark

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          • #6
            Sir John might buy one so he can launch his BP over the stuff on his floor & into the skip.
            John

            I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jugs
              Sir John might buy one so he can launch his BP over the stuff on his floor & into the skip.
              Or he could use it to suck the swarf of the floor and metal spray the shafts he's always working on.

              Rob

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