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  • Apply for "approved email sender" status?

    On another email group, I was asked for a PDF of an ancient piece of tooling I had drawings of...... Asked by email to me directly, not through the group..........

    So I sent the stuff to the given address, like any decent person.

    I get back a lovely little message saying that I should apply for "approved sender status" by filling out the form at the linked address, otherwise my message will not go through and will be dumped as spam.

    Since the sender already had my email address, and actually wanted something, you'd a thunk...........

    Anyway, the "approved sender status" was a new on to me..... is this some sort of 'wave of the future"?

    Are we all going to accept messages only from folks we already know?

    It seems a little odd, and frankly I don't respond well to it (I put the person on my own permanent blocked senders list). it seems especially insulting when someone asks for something and then wants me to fill out forms just so I can provide them with what they asked for.

    Must be another feature of the "nobility", the ones who drive Lexus, BMW, and Daimler.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    It means the sender has restricted in-bound email to those on his "white list". It saves getting a lot of junk mail but severely restricts valid communication too. My Aunt uses that setting and I have to remember which email address I need to use for her. How the receiver options the routing of the non-listed addresses also determines if he will see the mail or if it gets dumped.

    People that use Roadrunner as an ISP and use their email client usually get this set by default. The form you fill out goes to the ISP and they in turn send a notice to the recipient. I don't fill out the forms either.
    Last edited by CCWKen; 09-30-2011, 10:08 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by CCWKen
      but severely restricts valid communication too.
      Um.... that WOULD be apparently a "yes it does".........
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        I run a couple of mailing lists and occasionally run into that. I can't say that I'm sorry that I refuse to play their games, if they filter their mail through something like that they don't get my mail or list traffic. However unlikable spam may be no one has the right to put management of it on everyone mailing them.

        If they notice I usually suggest that they setup a gmail account and subscribe from there - Google's spam filters are very good.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rkepler
          If they notice I usually suggest that they setup a gmail account and subscribe from there - Google's spam filters are very good.
          So is Microsoft's through Live Mail. Some drop into the "junk" folder but at least I can still review the sender and decide to read it or not.

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          • #6
            someone at some point signed up for this service trying to control spam thinking it a good idea. Unlikely its arrogance or an attempt to piss you or anyone off, they just didn't think it through. So just tell them, they may have even forgotten there mail works that way or appreciate what it does to guys like you trying to help and will probably apologize for the inconvenience. Now if they aren't socially aware enough to apologize, well, that's when the move squarely into the asshat category
            .

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            • #7
              The idea of filling out a form was pretty popular just before Bayesian spam filtering got implemented - most large ISPs have gotten away from it again.

              The whitelist form idea actually works pretty well at reducing spam, but it (as noted) seems to cut down on desired e-mail as well.

              The easiest solution has been mentioned - suggest they get a backup e-mail address such as gmail for these kinds of situations.

              Alternatively, if they e-mail you first, your reply might get through their whitelist filter without additional manual work.

              All parts of the reasons large-scale spam operations get so little love in the professional IT world....
              Hemi-proprietor,
              Esoteric Garage

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              • #8
                Try sending a message without the attachment.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #9
                  Using a whitelist form is just a way to ensure that a human sent the mail as opposed to some form of automated spammer. You have the option of helping the recipient out or not. I don't mind since all the form usually does is ask that you type in a word. It's remarkably effective, since virtually all spam is from faked or stolen addresses. Spam sources never go to the site and add to the whitelist.

                  I've had the same email address for close to 20 years. I also get hundreds of spam messages each day. Several hundreds. I don't even bother counting them anymore. Even a Bayesian filter can't keep up with all the interesting ways that the spammers disguise the mail.

                  I've finally resorted to filters and a whitelist and a Bayesian filter. Between the 3 techniques I only have about 30 a day that are questionable, and only see a few valid messages a year make it into the trash.

                  Dan
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                  • #10
                    This has been mentioned before; If you run your own mail server make up an address "[email protected]_mail.com". Nobody sends spam to an admin address. I use it and it works.

                    Another technique that seems to work is to use a long name like "[email protected]_mail.com" Spammers draw the line somewhere just for formatting reasons on spam lists. I also use that and it works.

                    Another way it to make up disposable mail addresses at places like Yahoo, Hotmail and Google. Use it for junk accounts like online commenting on news stories and download signups. When it becomes too busy, abandon it. I also do that.
                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                    • #11
                      I've got more than one registered domain. I accept any email address to those domains and hand out random addresses as disposable. When I start getting spam on one of them I can track it back to the party who sold, lost, or traded my info and flag the related address as a spam trap. Since communications after that are all flagged as spam, it is likely to cost the (ir)responsible party business.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Evan
                        This has been mentioned before; If you run your own mail server make up an address "[email protected]_mail.com". Nobody sends spam to an admin address. I use it and it works.

                        Another technique that seems to work is to use a long name like "[email protected]_mail.com" Spammers draw the line somewhere just for formatting reasons on spam lists. I also use that and it works.

                        Oh yeah. My mother can barely type my current (very simple) email address. Can you imagine if I gave her something complex like that?

                        My opinion... if the ISPs simply blocked OUTGOING tcp packets that spoofed their origin, then the number of worms, viruses and bots would plummet and then we would not have the spam problem.

                        Dan
                        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 2ManyHobbies
                          I accept any email address to those domains and hand out random addresses as disposable.
                          I did this when leaving school - I gave them an address something like [email protected][domain].com. They said it had to be a valid address - I told them it was and that this particular address was being given just to them.

                          Oddly, I never got any e-mail sent to it....
                          Hemi-proprietor,
                          Esoteric Garage

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                          • #14
                            if the ISPs simply blocked OUTGOING tcp packets that spoofed their origin, then the number of worms, viruses and bots would plummet and then we would not have the spam problem.
                            Unfortunately that won't work. The vast majority of spam comes from "bots" which are compromised home machines that act as relays for the spammers. The mail originates from a valid address.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Evan
                              Unfortunately that won't work. The vast majority of spam comes from "bots" which are compromised home machines that act as relays for the spammers. The mail originates from a valid address.
                              Actually, some of the larger ISPs are blocking anything from port 25 to block the sending of email from compromised systems.

                              http://www.postcastserver.com/help/P..._Blocking.aspx

                              So "valid" address or not the traffic gets blocked at the ISP. That does cause more of a load on the ISP as they have to manage a forwarding service that accepts relay from their own IP range and help their customers in sending email but overall it likely eases the burden on their network to not have spambots running on their nets 24/7.

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