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Riffler filres I have made

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  • #16
    Read the original post again,David. For cleaning up relief chiseling on flintlock pistol barrels.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by gwilson
      You can make your own surface protectant by taking ordinary flour,say 1/2 cup. Add 1/2 tsp. of yeast(to hold the batter together) and a little salt(not sure why the salt is added). Then,add water carefully to make a thick batter. Dip your tool in it,and let it dry a bit.When you heat it up,it will burn,smelling like burnt bread,but leaving a coating of carbon on the tool. It will come off easily after quenching,leaving a nice,clean,untouched gray surface,without burned teeth. Thing is,you have to make it every time you need it,or it will rot,of course.
      Unless you use it for biscuits & gravy at breakfast!
      I cut it twice, and it's still too short!
      Scott

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      • #18
        Originally posted by gwilson
        I need to get my wife's BETTER camera,and take some detail shots of the ends of some of these files.
        I don't think a better camera will help. A one megapixel camera is more than sufficient for posting images on the web. It's the technique that needs to be improved. Can you post what camera you have and how you take the pictures? If you're not using a tripod, try resting the camera on a small beanbag (not a beanbag chair from the 60's).

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        • #19
          I have mounted the camera on a tripod,and used special lights. The focusing of these digital cameras (at least mine) just isn't reliable when it comes to doing close ups of small objects. I wish it had manual focus.

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          • #20
            Which camera is it?

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            • #21
              A Canon Powershot SD 890 is.My wife,who is a good photographer,says it's an antique. But,I can tell you,it's NOT made of BRASS!

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              • #22
                Try shooting a target with lots of contrast, just an X with a small black marker. Shoot the first shot with the target perpendicular to the camera. If this reliably focuses, then try with the target tilted 45 degrees (it doesn't matter which way. Check to see if it focused on the correct spot.

                If it can reliably focus on the target, then you can use a technique I used a few years ago for focus stacking macros. Basically set the target to one side of the subject at exactly the same distance from the camera. Focus on the target by half pressing the shutter, then rotate to the subject and press the shutter all the way.

                If it can't reliably focus on the target, get a new camera.

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                • #23
                  I think I'd better start using my wife's Nikon 35 mm.

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                  • #24
                    Avoid using flash and shoot your photos outdoors.

                    BTW, exquisite work on the beautiful brass dividing head. Judging by the replies; you and I are the only two people here that know what a pump drill is. For the record, the pump drill dates back to ancient Egypt. I don't know what they used for bits but they drilled small holes in stone with it.

                    Chris

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                    • #25
                      Thanks,Chris. Glad that you liked it. I have avoided using flash. Doing it outside is the best,but not always available. We have special lights that I have gotten into using sometimes. These were early pictures.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by gwilson
                        Thanks,Chris. Glad that you liked it. I have avoided using flash. Doing it outside is the best,but not always available. We have special lights that I have gotten into using sometimes. These were early pictures.
                        You might find one of these tents very useful for your work. They're very affordable.

                        http://www.alzodigital.com/studio_lighting.htm

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by gwilson
                          Thanks,Chris. Glad that you liked it.
                          Ha, that's an understatement. It's a museum grade work of art!

                          Chris

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                          • #28
                            See the new post about using the rifflers on a pistol barrel,Chris. I WAS in a museum for 39 years as musical instrument maker,then toolmaker.

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                            • #29
                              Thank all of you for the photo advice

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                              • #30
                                You have great advice for improving your photography from several
                                posts already. Elf's (#18 & #22) in particular.

                                In addition to some suggestions I'll elaborate on below, I encourage
                                you to give using tripod-like devices another chance. (I will find
                                it interesting to see what you might develop for your own uses after
                                browsing through the fixtures displayed in a Manfrotto catalog.)
                                Image quality is sensitive to camera movement during shutter operation.
                                The light gathering qualities of compact camera lens are typically
                                at a disadvantage relative to those of larger camera lens and this
                                results in slower shutter speeds for given ambiant lighting conditions.
                                Also, compact cameras are physically lighter, making them more difficult
                                to hold steady than bigger cameras when shooting hand-held.

                                Originally posted by elf
                                Which camera is it?
                                Originally posted by gwilson
                                A Canon Powershot SD 890 IS. My wife, who is a good photographer,
                                says it's an antique.
                                According to the Owner's Manual and a review at website dpreview.com,
                                the Canon SD 890 was announced in 2008. It is a 10 megapixel unit with
                                an extensive list of features and is hardly an antique, at least by my modest
                                standards.

                                In addition to using a tripod, my suggestions are to employ the Self-Timer
                                (pg 68), along with Macro Mode (pg 67) or Digital Macro Mode (pg 66). The
                                timer enables you to eliminate yourself as one of the sources of camera
                                instability. The owner's manual has more details about the focal distances
                                offered in Macro and Digital Macro modes.

                                Some other features to experiment with. Try manually setting ISO Speed (pg 74).
                                This is the digital equivalent of chosing film type for an analog camera
                                (ASA 25, 64, 100, 200, 400 & ect.) The higher the number, the faster the
                                shutter speed for available light (with a commensurate degradation in grain
                                in the image.)

                                Also, try turning off the Image Stabilizer Function (pg 72). For one reason,
                                it doesn't operate when the camera is held vertically (pg 73). For another,
                                I prefer to turn off the hand-holding nannys in special circumstances where
                                I have taken other precautions.

                                Adjusting Metering Mode (pg 102) to the 'Spot' setting may be benefical.

                                Adjusting White Balance (pg 104) can help improve the natural colours of
                                images when shooting in ambiant conditions with incandescent, fluorescent and
                                other types of lighting.

                                In short, while it is possible the camera is defective, based on the information
                                you have provided so far, it is premature to conclude that at this point.
                                In any event, whether you stick with this unit or move on to another, spending
                                some time becoming familiar with the settings described above and others that
                                the SD 890 is capable of will instill transferable skills that will serve well
                                no matter what camera you choose to use. Your current recuperation
                                gives you the perfect opportunity to explore ...

                                .

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