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A chiseled relief pistol barrel made with rifflers

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  • Rustybolt
    replied
    I think some of the stuff George does would be better served by video taping.
    George is one of those rare craftsmen that I would pay to just sit and watch him work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Weston Bye
    replied
    Originally posted by gwilson
    I suppose I could write it o.k.. Just a question of time,money,and energy. Thank you for your kind thoughts,and all the others,too.
    It can be done. Over the years I have turned out over two dozen articles on various subjects for HSM, MW and DM. All while plodding through a regular day job, carrying on with the usual social and family obligations, and the occasional moonlight job. There are others that are more prolific, skilled and imaginative than I am.

    Pick a subject or object that you did in the past and write 3000 words about it. Add some pictures and some sketches. If the project was done long in the past and no longer available, remake a few small details and document the process with photos. You are showing how, not what - demonstrating the process, not the product.

    Some of the threads you posted here are a good starting point. Add a few more details to each and you are off to a good start on a book.

    However, don't let your penchant for perfection get in your way, or you will never finish - or even start.

    Leave a comment:


  • gizmo2
    replied
    Wow. Yup, that's all I wanted to say.

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  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Do you suppose it would be feasible with practice to do reasonable Bas Relief
    work by first tracing out an image and then working the traced image with
    chisels?

    If so, what material and initial selection of tools would you suggest that
    a novice would do well to begin with?

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris S.
    replied
    This a tough call. On one hand, your close to my age and the reality of how long you'll be able to continue your fine work is an issue. There's no way you'll be able to write a book and maintain your current shop time. On the other hand if you don't write a book you'll be taking a life time of knowledge with you.

    Wait, ....I just considered what I would do if I had your skills. I'd do what I love to do, while I could still do it.

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • gwilson
    replied
    I suppose I could write it o.k.. Just a question of time,money,and energy. Thank you for your kind thoughts,and all the others,too.

    Leave a comment:


  • HWooldridge
    replied
    Originally posted by gwilson
    hwoolridge,my mother always told me that SHE had forgotten more than I'll ever know!

    Thank you for the best compliment I have ever had.

    Lots of people have encouraged me to write a book,but I'm just not inclined to write like some . Nor do I know what such a book would cost,especially with a lot of pictures. And,it would have very limited sales,too.
    Need to find a technical book editor who could have someone "ghost write" for you. I have written some technical papers over the years and it's not too tough if you start with a basic template. The important things are to describe proper sequence and have plenty of quality photos.

    You might be surprised how many people would buy it - especially if you sold it online as downloads. For example, you could describe this gun barrel in detail with pics and required tools to make one and sell that as a single lesson. Just a thought...

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeCB
    replied
    George, thank you for sharing your unique expierences with us. The pics are fine, the work exceptional. As for writing a book, it may seem a daunting task, but should be doable by one as diligent as your self... if not a complete book now, surley you should begin compiling detailed notes with sketches documenting your lifes work.

    Joe B

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    Originally posted by gwilson
    Some have asked what I did with the rifflers.
    Thank you.

    Both for the primary images and construction details, as well as for
    the accompanying background that often accompany your posts.

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • gwilson
    replied
    hwoolridge,my mother always told me that SHE had forgotten more than I'll ever know!

    Thank you for the best compliment I have ever had.

    Lots of people have encouraged me to write a book,but I'm just not inclined to write like some . Nor do I know what such a book would cost,especially with a lot of pictures. And,it would have very limited sales,too.

    Leave a comment:


  • HWooldridge
    replied
    Originally posted by gwilson
    No,Chris. I was hired in 1970 at Colonial Williamsburg to be the first(and only) Master Musical Instrument Maker. I set up that new shop,and ran it till 1986. The director had seen tools I had made in my then SMALL home shop. It was too small at the time to make instruments,plus the dust,etc. He needed someone to make proper 18th.C. style tools for the Historic Area craftsmen,who were using a hodgepodge of mostly incorrect tools. In 1986 I finally agreed to become the Master Toolmaker(probably the first and last of that,too.) I retired in 2009 at age 67. I think only a journeyman will carry on. They want to save money,and I'm not sure if the days of the Master Craftsman position is over. They may just have shop supervisors in future.

    I did use the boring machine at the gunsmith's shop to finish ream the brass barrel,but never worked there.

    P.S.,years ago,in the 80's,Roy did do a show in the musical instrument maker's shop when I was there. I saw that all my staff were in the show.
    You really should write a compendium of your knowledge as it is priceless for future generations. Your career is truly one of those where it can be said, "...he forgot more than most people will ever learn..."

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris S.
    replied
    George, you certainly have a proud and colorful history. I'm sure I saw that Woodwright episode. I missed very few of them.

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • gwilson
    replied
    No,Chris. I was hired in 1970 at Colonial Williamsburg to be the first(and only) Master Musical Instrument Maker. I set up that new shop,and ran it till 1986. The director had seen tools I had made in my then SMALL home shop. It was too small at the time to make instruments,plus the dust,etc. He needed someone to make proper 18th.C. style tools for the Historic Area craftsmen,who were using a hodgepodge of mostly incorrect tools. In 1986 I finally agreed to become the Master Toolmaker(probably the first and last of that,too.) I retired in 2009 at age 67. I think only a journeyman will carry on. They want to save money,and I'm not sure if the days of the Master Craftsman position is over. They may just have shop supervisors in future.

    I did use the boring machine at the gunsmith's shop to finish ream the brass barrel,but never worked there.

    P.S.,years ago,in the 80's,Roy did do a show in the musical instrument maker's shop when I was there. I saw that all my staff were in the show.
    Last edited by gwilson; 10-03-2011, 02:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris S.
    replied
    Originally posted by duckman
    George leave the pictures alone we need to see the exquisite work you do if its a lot of trouble for them to scroll side ways they need to get a bigger monitor.
    I second this motion. Your art work needs to exhibit all of its detail. You posses great old world skill. I think Roy Underhill would love to have you on his show!

    George, did I understand that you gunsmithed at the Williamsburg gun shop?

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • garyphansen
    replied
    George: Thanks for posting, I for one like your Photos big. Nice work, by the way. What do you plan on doing with your unfinished barrel? Gary P. Hansen

    Leave a comment:

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