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replacement lathe spindle & more

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  • #16
    Hi.
    I'm new to the forum and I have a lathe similar to yours which has an identical spindle.
    I would like to know how you machined the spindle taper.
    I have a counterbore in the front of the tapered bearing as well and have considered adding a thrust bearing. The bearing on mine is still in pretty decent shape though so I can still use it.
    Thanks,
    Bill

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    • #17
      my old lathe has a similar set up on the spindle, with a taper at the nose and a keyed taper to take up end play at the rear. The back side of the register does ride on the face of the headstock, as evidenced by the wear there. If there was a way to put an angular contact bearing in the front and a regular bearing in the back I'd do it in a heart beat, but that's way above my abilities. As it is, I just work around it, mostly keeping an eye on the endplay as the lathe is being used as it starts binding after being used a lot and is sloppy when the garage is cold!

      I agree with the others above, without some kind of radial bearing, you won't be able to take any kind of cut or get any sort of accuracy out of that lathe. Given that you obviously have the machining chops to do all the other cool stuff you've done with it, is there any way that you can fix that headstock? Say bolt it to the cross slide of your lathe and stick a boring bar in the chuck?

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      • #18
        Nice job, good to see a machine rescued.
        I bought a wood turning lathe off fleabay, electra beckum odd name, found the headstock spindle was solid, no taper socket, just a metric threaded snout, i was not happy, still trying to figure out how to fix!
        Mark

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        • #19
          Responding to BillsMachine - I, too, am new to the forum and have an identical lathe, with an identical problem: a broken spindle. After years of putting it off I am about to attempt making a replacement. I've made a detailed measured drawing in pdf format if anyone is interested. I will be replicating the original nose thread of 12tpi.

          As noted in another post, the lathe is not terribly precise but I've found it perfectly suitable for small wood turning projects. In fact, I suspect it was originally intended for just the hobbyist or possibly pattern making. On the subject of thrust bearings and binding, I never had a problem. It is, of course, important to keep the journals oiled but the front taper bearing provides for axial thrust. The rear bearing adjusts for wear and keeps the radial runout within the limits of the journals' design tolerances.

          I can't post it here but if anyone wants to see the pdf (41kb), just send me a note and I would be happy to share.

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          • #20
            The spindle taper is designed to take radial and axial loads.
            Countless lathes use this bearing design.
            If you use the needle thrust bearing to take axial loads,
            then the tapered plain bearing is no longer in intimate
            contact with the babbit (bronze, whatever), then the
            lathe will chatter to high heck, as there is essentially
            no preload to create spindle stiffness. A rigid spindle
            is the heart of a lathe or any machine tool.
            I hate to poo poo your enthusiasm, but you need to
            re-think the bearings a little bit. Do some research
            on machine tool spindles. There are books dedicated
            to the subject. I don't remember the name, but there
            is a web site for a spindle repair service in the internet
            that has some very good information posted on bearing
            and spindle design. Maybe someone has the link.
            A++ for effort on your spindle, just don't see you as
            being happy with how the lathe will run with it.

            --Doozer
            DZER

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            • #21
              Very nice piece of work, and as posted, great to see this lathe saved.

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              • #22
                I know its been a lot of years since you started this topic but I have just started restoring the same lathe (I also have the smaller polishing Goodell Pratt lathe) and I was wondering how your modified spindle turned out? What future modifications did you end up doing? Did you end up getting some reasonable use out of it? Do you have any advice? Thanks,

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                • #23
                  That wear in the front headstock bearing bore looks like it was caused by running the lathe with a tight belt and very little lubrication. Its a shame the headstock seems to be part of the main bed casting. It might be possible to support some kind of line boring bar between the rear bearing bore and a block secured to the middle of the bed.

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