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One for the knife makers - handle riveting

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  • DFMiller
    replied
    Comedy is best with two people.

    Thanks for the entertainment.
    Dave

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  • gwilson
    replied
    You are such a funny man,John. That was just so incomparably witty. Why don't you go in stage with your comedy show? Or,you COULD wait until you have something intelligent to say. But,on the other hand,I suppose you WOULD like to post again before you die of old age.
    Last edited by gwilson; 10-09-2011, 06:58 PM.

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  • lynnl
    replied
    I still remember the first time I used that electric knife - my first experience with one.

    As I turned it on, I stuck my other thumb forward, out of habit, to test the sharpness just as I'd normally do with a regular knife.

    Fortunately just at the last moment I realized the folly of that.

    Wife still reminds me of that just about every time I use it.

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    17th Century carbide blades or brass ?

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  • gwilson
    replied
    Mine (I found another one) have a powdery coating of carbide on them. With it,I can slice the nicest,accurate, thin slices of turkey breast. Just wonderful for cutting meat. And,it doesn't make the most tender turkey fall apart from the effort of cutting. You should try it. I don't know if they are made any more.

    I gave one to my mother years ago. She was horrified at it. Some time later,she had become completely addicted to the ease of using it,once she had gotten over being afraid of it.
    Last edited by gwilson; 10-09-2011, 05:38 PM.

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  • lynnl
    replied
    Originally posted by gwilson
    I use an electric knife with carbide coated serrated blade.
    Speaking of serrated blades, we were given a GE electric knife as a wedding gift (1968). Have used it all these years, and I can't tell that it cuts any less efficiently than when new. Of course those are stainless blades.

    Haven't seen any w/carbide or carbide coated blades. But then I haven't looked either.

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  • gwilson
    replied
    Not always possible to avoid bad conditions. I use an electric knife with carbide coated serrated blade. It will spoil anyone who uses one.

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  • lynnl
    replied
    What about the hot juices encountered in slicing a roast right out of the 350F oven?

    Hmmm, maybe this is why I have such trouble carving the turkey on Thanksgiving. I'll start cooling it in an ice bath from now on, prior to carving.

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  • Rigger
    replied
    God Dammit John that's another keyboard you owe me and if I keep spitting coffee all over these special forces guys I'm in deep trouble.

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  • gwilson
    replied
    Black Forest,didn't you just say that you thought you were getting better performance out of your razor by using cool water?

    Tis thread has reached its conclusion. Stalemate. I'm done with it. Just head knocking about nothing,really. I just know what works for me.

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Originally posted by gwilson
    Strange,how I can do the work I do,and at the same time be so wrong about what I know,isn't it?
    Magnetic personality ?

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    Mr. Wilson, Maybe your apprentice had a very skilled craftsman but unskilled teacher!

    "Strange,how I can do the work I do,and at the same time be so wrong about what I know,isn't it?"

    That does not make sense. The work you do is great. No doubt about that. BUT that doesn't have anything to do with why you shouldn't wash a steel knife in hot water. Just because you have always heard that you should not do it does not mean it is actually fact. I don't care how long you have been doing your good work. Makes no sense. The micro fractures could be so but I would have to have a controlled test to agree with that theory. You sound a little bit like the parent that tells the kid "because I said so!"

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  • gwilson
    replied
    Strange,how I can do the work I do,and at the same time be so wrong about what I know,isn't it?

    I had a guy who I taught to make guitars,and who only ever managed to produce one mediocre guitar in 3 years of trying,tell me that he knew as much about it as I did. I had hired him as my first apprentice in Williamsburg in 1970,having no one else with any experience to call upon. I had been building for about 16 years at that time.

    Well,I didn't fire him. The director did.

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  • lazlo
    replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson
    Well don't wash your memory in hot water, clumsy bastard............
    OK, now I'm morbidly curious -- who took YOD to task for the Old Wives Tale that you have to let blades (or gravers) "rest" before using them?

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Originally posted by Your Old Dog

    Reminds me of a very early post I made years ago wherein I mentioned to the group that engravers frequently "pre-wear" the cutting surface of chisels with 4/0 jewellers sand paper to prevent the tips from snapping. Sir John, Earl of Sudspumpwater had a ball with that one. .

    EDITED FOR CORRECTIVE MEASURES: I have received a flood of emails......alright, that's a lie. I received an email stating that it wasn't Sir John who belittled and disgraced my reputation, defamed my character and in general made life a living hell for me My rusty memory is telling me it was: ________________________
    Well don't wash your memory in hot water, clumsy bastard............

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