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  • Home made lathe

    Hi
    Check out the photos of this Australian home made lathe

    http://www.woodworkforums.com/f65/im...-lathe-142287/

    Cheers Jim

  • #2
    Yowza.....

    While it may have been made "at home", I just can't bring myself to call it "home-made"......

    How about "factory built at home"?
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #3
      Not to take it away from that one, but there is another one that sold on ebay on the second page.

      Dave

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      • #4
        We have no idea what goes on in homeshops, very impressive and ingenious people quietly building their own projects.

        Thanks for posting this, GREAT!!

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        • #5
          Amazing work! He not only built the lathe, did you notice the "Goodies" on the back shelf? Milling attachment, Taper attachment, Indexable drill chuck?.
          It also looks like he incorporated a lot of features in his lathe that he found desirable in a lathe over the course of his career.
          George Bulliss - Got any writers down that way that might be able to do a writeup?
          I cut it twice, and it's still too short!
          Scott

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          • #6
            Wonderful craftmanship......... But why

            plenty of good machinery out there so why go to all that effort to copy whats already available ???? I can't see any innovations, in fact he's coped all the std faults in lathe design
            John

            I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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            • #7
              So, why two lead screws?

              And looking deeper is the smaller one powered? can see both ends of it in the pics, but can't see a drive mechanism for the inner one.

              Comment


              • #8
                One is LH the & other RH
                John

                I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jugs
                  Wonderful craftmanship......... But why

                  plenty of good machinery out there so why go to all that effort to copy whats already available ???? I can't see any innovations, in fact he's coped all the std faults in lathe design

                  Well, why do anything if it comes to that? Far easier just to sit on the couch watching TV. Perhaps the 'building' was more the point than the 'having'?
                  Tel

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                  • #10
                    I'm wondering if it was ENTIRELY (all components) built by that individual. Or if he just cast and fabricated a lot of missing or unuseable components needed to complement other parts on hand.

                    That original thread wasn't altogether specific about that, so far as I could tell.

                    Either way, he did an amazing job.
                    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                    • #11
                      If only the old bloke was around to tell us, or had of put a right up on the internet.

                      Dave

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jugs
                        One is LH the & other RH
                        my guess is to suit the arrangement of gears in apron. I suppose its metric and imperial- that's an innovation i've not seen let along on a small machines...sure you can do the change gear but not near as a conveniently as with half nuts

                        as to why? I agree in this day and age. But its not hard to imagine someone doing so when a quality lathe cost what a car cost and the old boy worked at Consolidated Flange who supplied all the materials, facilities and his time, + he really really wanted to.

                        if everything needed a pragmatic reason this place would be a ghost town
                        .

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by stix012
                          Hi
                          Check out the photos of this Australian home made lathe

                          http://www.woodworkforums.com/f65/im...-lathe-142287/

                          Cheers Jim

                          AWESOME!!!

                          Al

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It's certainly a masterpiece! Remember the one Hubert built Al? A lot simpler, but a very nice job as well!

                            http://www.lathes.co.uk/elffers/
                            Tel

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                            • #15
                              There is more information here;

                              http://www.woodworkforums.com/f12/de...t-sale-142196/

                              The lathe was built in the 70's when the before the chicom invasion, when lathes for the HSM were much less available and affordable than they are today. He built the lathe to build a model Ruston & Hornsby IC engine. There are photos of the engine in the link above. A local newspaper writeup of the engine and at lathe when he built them;

                              http://www.woodworkforums.com/attach...frank-parr.pdf
                              Jim H.

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