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I heard someone talking about Joseph Whitworth on the radio

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  • I heard someone talking about Joseph Whitworth on the radio

    To my surprise and delight, I tuned into a station on a drive home last night
    and heard an announcer talking about Joseph Whitworth during a program
    about the creation and adoption of standards.

    Among the tidbits offered during portions I heard, novel to me was the
    suggestion that the French revolution and the execution by guillotine of King
    Louis XVI played a pivotal role in the development of the metric system.

    Anyone who wishes to hear the broadcast for themselves can do so here.
    The Screw That Changed the World
    CBC
    Broadcast: Monday - October 17, 2011

    There's a secret at the heart of our modern economy: standards.
    Standards frame every aspect of our lives, according to Karl Turner,
    from the nuts and bolts that hold our material world together to life's
    genetic blueprint.

    I settling in now to listen to the program in its entirety.

    .

  • #2
    Great find!!!

    I have one to report.

    http://www.archive.org/index.php

    One of the things it has are a HUGE number of the old radio programs - comedy, mystery, etc. like Jack Benny, Amos 'n Andy, The Inner Sanctum and the like, all in .MP3 format. I have downloaded hundreds of these and listen to them while working in my shop. You will find an extensive listing in the Audio section. And its all FREE!

    Planeman
    Last edited by planeman; 10-19-2011, 10:17 AM.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the tip.

      More information from the broadcast above that I discovered when I heard
      the entire program was about the development and adoption of shipping
      containers.

      I remember the days before widespread truck transport when goods shipped
      loose in railcars and cartage companies had large crews at railyards detailed
      to empty/fill cars and trucks/warehouses for transfer and storage.

      I can also picture photographs in business magazines of the 60's & 70's
      discussing containerization and the transformation of port facilities. All
      in large part due to a fellow from North Carolina.
      Malcom Purcell McLean
      • father of containerization,
      • founder of SeaLand Service

      Malcom McLean

      The Box That Changed the World

      .

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by EddyCurr
        Silly me, I thought the screw that changed the world was the one that cost Tiger Woods his career.
        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

        Comment


        • #5
          Tiger Woods

          Nope. He's still out there swingin' his putter.

          Comment


          • #6
            Too bad that McLean Transportation did not survive "De-regulation" back in the '70's!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by EddyCurr
              To my surprise and delight, I tuned into a station on a drive home last night and heard an announcer talking about Joseph Whitworth during a program about the creation and adoption of standards.
              Ironic that the Whitworth thread is neither an Imperial nor Metric standard
              "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by lazlo
                Ironic that the Whitworth thread is neither an Imperial nor Metric standard
                Ironic that it's stronger than both
                .

                Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by lazlo
                  Ironic that the Whitworth thread is neither an Imperial nor Metric standard
                  And bizarre that the thread form lives on in ISO pipe threads
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by wierdscience
                    And bizarre that the thread form lives on in ISO pipe threads
                    I know, whatever genius came up with that idea should be strung-up by their thumbs. Metric orifices, Imperial TPI, and Whitworth threads.

                    They're so close to NPT that you can start to thread it on, until it gets stuck and you realize it's an odd-ball.
                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lazlo
                      They're so close to NPT that you can start to thread it on, until it gets stuck and you realize it's an odd-ball.
                      For the rest of the world...it's NPT that's oddball!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Peter S
                        For the rest of the world...it's NPT that's oddball!
                        Well, Canada and the US uses NPT, Japan uses JIS, the Brits use British Pipe Threads (with Imperial Dimensions). It's only mainland EU that uses the wacky ISO standard (Metric orifices, Imperial threads per inch, and Witworth threads).

                        Doesn't Australia use BSP and not ISO-G?
                        Last edited by lazlo; 10-20-2011, 12:13 PM.
                        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lazlo

                          Doesn't Australia use BSP and not ISO-G?
                          Indeed we do!
                          Tel

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by John Stevenson
                            Ironic that it's stronger than both
                            Yes, by an completely inconsequential amount.
                            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                            Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by wierdscience
                              And bizarre that the thread form lives on in ISO pipe threads
                              It is also the thread form for UN threads or it would be if done properly.
                              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                              Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                              Comment

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