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  • Belt/Pulley question

    I am currently reassembling my 11" Powermatic/Houdaille lathe. You may recall I got one that was pretty rusted from neglect in an unheated storage box (shipping container) for a couple of years.It has cleaned up very well, I am please with the results. One of the most affected parts is the 1 3/4" OD, 16 groove pulley on the jack shaft that drives the 16 rib, mini-V spindle belt.

    The pulley pitted with some small (under 1/16 dia) pits. I am wondering if it is going to chew up the belt since the belt surfaces are not smooth. I hate to spring $100.00 for a new pulley while I am trying to save up for a VFD drive. But I also hate to put it all back together then have to replace the spindle belt after a few hours.

    I am thinking of putting it all back together with the old belt and pulley. Then make a new pulley as my first project. That saves me the 100 but I still have to take it all back apart again to put on the new belt I have and pulley.

    Any thoughts.

    Thanks,

    John

  • #2
    Make the pulley..... it won't take long enough to tear up the belt, and most likely that would only tear up if it slipped, which isn't too likely with those. ordinary "creep" takes longer.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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    • #3
      For sure run it with your pitted pulley. My guess is you won't have any problems. If the problem were mine, before I spent any $$ or time on a new pulley, I'd try filling the pits with metallized epoxy and then sanding smooth.

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      • #4
        Run it as is.

        If this is one of the models with variable speed via expanding pulleys plan on problems including noise and vibration not because of the pitting, but because of age and the fact they were a piss poor design in the first place.

        Save for the VFD.

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        • #5
          First, can you buy a link type belt that fits? Avoids the problem of tearing the machine apart. Filling the pits seems a good idea also, but personally,I don't think that pits will affect belt life. If anything, the opposite should be the problem. Any elevated areas such as corrosion would act as sandpaper. Go ahead and run it. Bob.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by J Tiers
            Make the pulley..... it won't take long enough to tear up the belt, and most likely that would only tear up if it slipped, which isn't too likely with those. ordinary "creep" takes longer.
            Have you taken a ckose look at the pulleys on Earthmoving equipment the belts and pulleys are often running in dust and grit for hours on end and all it does is to polish the pulleys and abrade the belts slightly , our service vehicles often have the crank pulley in mud when negotiating some sites , the belts squeal a bit then settle down and seem to last just as long as normal.
            Michael

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            • #7
              I would take a wire brush (either manual, or wheel on a power drill) and brush the pully clean of all the loose rust till it takes on a dull shine, And then use it as is. Try and keep the rust dust outta the bearings and all that as it is abrasive.
              Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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              • #8
                The pits CAN tear it up..... Depends on how sharp they are.

                While the pulley is under tension, the rubber bulges into pits. if the belt also 'creeps", as it will under torque load, that scrubs the rubber past the pits, and the bulge is stressed in a way to try to shave it off.

                Eventiually that will tear up or wear the belt.

                I suppose if it is bad enough, the pits might function as part of the drive like a cog belt...

                Filling the pits is a good idea, although on a multigroove pulley that could get to be a significant pain in the tusch.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • #9
                  I'd run it as is. The Poly-vee belts will not chew up as bad as you may think. Even if one or two (or 5, or...) ribs get some wear, you won't notice it. Making a new pulley isn't hard, but it can likely wait.

                  I would not file or sand or...... Wrap a wet rag of evaporust (or dribble for hours) to remove the rust (and not the metal). I might use a fine steel wire brush.

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                  • #10
                    I'm not really understanding the "mini v" terminology. When yous say 16 rib mini v, do you mean a belt like the one in modern serpentine (multi-vee) belt systems, say like on the front of a car engine driving the accessories?

                    If yes, then the pitting won't make a difference. In my experience using those same types of belts, in order to gain tractive force when wrapping those belts around small diameter pulleys and driving high load components, we used to cut slots in the small pulley in order to make the belt drive the load via mechanical shear in the rubber, rather than relying on the friction between the belt and the pulley. Those systems lasted a long time, until we far exceeded the belt's power carrying capacity, in which case the slots hurt the belt very quickly. We were running probably 60-70 hp through an 8 rib or 10 rib belt, driving slotted pulleys mounted to superchargers. A 16 rib pulley on a low power machine will probably last forever.

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