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  • OT Another good landing

    A dam fine landing I would say!-

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/s...0/1?csp=34news
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    A fine landing indeed, and the pilot deserved praise.... But only to the extent that he didn't botch it. Such a landing, wheels or no wheels, should be routine. He should grease it on every time. I have endured rough landings where the pilot had no excuse for such.

    The network news reports put me in bad sorts with their sappy fawning over the " heroic pilot, the equal of Sully Sullenberger." The wheels-up landing doesn't compare to the water landing on the Hudson.

    What has happened to our world where the achievement of routine competence is equated with heroism? Nonetheless, I am grateful for the pilot's competence.
    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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    • #3
      Not to take away from Sully who obviously did a great job in a bad situation but every "hero" pilot story seems to pale in comparison to Capt. Alfred Haynes the pilot of the DC 10 that cashed in Sioux City Iowa in 1989. That's the most amazing display of cool headedness and skill I have ever heard of. Although 112 people died many more would have been killed had Capt. Haynes not acted as he did, that pilot was a true hero!

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      • #4
        Where was the nissan truck?
        Andy

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        • #5
          Re Iowa City, I heard that they set up the same situation on a simulator with a view to teaching pilots to deal with it should something similar arise. It turned out to be too difficult for most pilots to accomplish. Invariably they would lose it at some point. Flying with only the engines for pitch and yaw control and many seconds spoolup delay nearly always resulted in porpoising out of control.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Evan
            Re Iowa City, I heard that they set up the same situation on a simulator with a view to teaching pilots to deal with it should something similar arise. It turned out to be too difficult for most pilots to accomplish. Invariably they would lose it at some point. Flying with only the engines for pitch and yaw control and many seconds spoolup delay nearly always resulted in porpoising out of control.

            And through the whole thing he was cool and calm, at times even joking with the controllers. When one of the controllers told him he was clear to land on any runway Capt Haynes said "so you're going to be picky and make it a runway"? True hero in every sense.

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            • #7
              That's taking cost-cutting measures past the extreme- were the wheels an option that they passed on?
              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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              • #8
                Those WW 2 pilots landing back in England with a shot up aircraft, crew and sometimes themselves did a pretty damn good job under far worse conditions. That's not brought up to take anything away from the other pilots mentioned.

                Pete

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                • #9
                  I had my first pilot training from a former RCAF pilot. He told me about the time he had to land his Hurricane with the throttle at maximum because the cable had been shot away. The only control he had was blipping it on and off at full throttle with the magnetos which is a good way to blow up the engine and to snap roll the aircraft. Then we went up for my second lesson and he demonstrated what happens when you cross control the aircraft and hold the nose up. It snap rolled inverted. Fortunately it was a Fleet Canuck which is fully aerobatic.
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                  • #10
                    I think I remember reading that in WW1 some of those rotary engines had no conventional throttle and power was controlled with the ignition being switched on/off.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by radkins
                      I think I remember reading that in WW1 some of those rotary engines had no conventional throttle and power was controlled with the ignition being switched on/off.

                      From what I recall reading they had rudimentary control of the carburetor which they had to adjust for altitude and power, these controls were far to slow for landing so the pilot had a control to short or one or more of the plugs. Of course there was the danger that if they shorted out for too long the plugs would oil up.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
                        Of course there was the danger that if they shorted out for too long the plugs would oil up.

                        I am sure that was one of the least dangerous things they dealt with, absolutely unbelievable what they were flying!

                        On another subject those rotary engines were fascinating to say the least.

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                        • #13
                          Long story here. I was on a Republic air flight that lost the front and half of the right landing gear upon takeoff.

                          We flew in circles while dumping fuel and had 2 jets from Nellis AFB about 8 ft off the wings looking at the damage. Got some good pics of them somewhere.

                          We landed veeery carefully with the nose in the air till the last second and slid along for a bit. Pilot did a good job.

                          Got in the airport and the news media was there asking questions, I told them what happened and they were not interested.
                          They wanted to talk only to the people that were panicked.

                          Pretty much finished any good image I might have had for the media right there.
                          Guaranteed not to rust, bust, collect dust, bend, chip, crack or peel

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                          • #14
                            How about working on the engine in mid-flight?

                            http://travelforaircraft.wordpress.c...ial-refueling/
                            Last edited by wierdscience; 11-01-2011, 11:54 PM.
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Evan
                              Then we went up for my second lesson and he demonstrated what happens when you cross control the aircraft and hold the nose up. It snap rolled inverted. Fortunately it was a Fleet Canuck which is fully aerobatic.

                              While practicing accelerated stalls, my wife's instructor (owner of the FBO) noticed she was cross controling a little with the nose came up as the speed bled off... so he told her to push the rudder in more and dial in more opposing aileron; he was going to teach her a simple lesson what happens.

                              Oh well.. sure enough, the POS Tomahawk snapped into it's typical nasty vertical spin (I hate that aircraft - placarded "not rated for spins" but it sure is easy to do and ugly when it does). My wife isn't the "scream and throw-up-hands" type... she thinks it's a stall. So full forward yoke and full throttle. LOL.... clip boards flying around the cabin, instantly pointing at the ground, unreasonable control forces immediately required, instructor screaming... "I've got it, let go of the ****ing yoke... 300 feet off the ground and beyond red-lined air speed he recovers. He was much more shaken than she was, and never dreamed she'd try to recover. She never flew with him again until her flight test. Unfortunately he was the local FAA Examiner, but she passed perfectly


                              My USAF (ret) instructor was completly different - you could be in an inverted dive with the wings falling off and he'd never take over; asked me on many occassions - "so... what are you going to do"?
                              Last edited by lakeside53; 11-01-2011, 11:46 PM.

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